Build a Solid Business & Repurpose Content – Fred Gleeck

Build a Solid Business & Repurpose Content – Fred Gleeck


This is the weekly special edition with Fred Gleeck. Fred, we have a ton to talk about this week. I brought the music back just for you this week.

Fred Gleeck:
Unbelievable. Listen to that bumper music or whatever we're calling it. I love it. It's great.

Lance Tamashiro:
I know, and you know what's so awesome is we've been doing this voice over class. We've been doing stuff with different people, so what I've figured out is or what's awesome is now I've got a whole bunch of people that I can go to to just make our little intros. People that want to listen to it, and I think it makes it really fun to just do things different. What I like about using people that I know, especially my competition, is I like to see what my competition is up to. I like to stay abreast of what they're doing.

One of the things that I think so many people miss out on is they say, "I'd never buy my competition's products. I'd never support them. I don't care what they're doing." I think the opposite. I like buying my competitors' stuff, one, to see what they're doing, but two, it creates a relationship with them where they're willing to talk to you because you've bought products from them, because they see your name and it opens up a whole different world of opportunity for you.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, and I would add to that that coming up in about 10 days from now, I'm going to some, somebody's holding a live seminar here in the Los Angeles area on Friday and Saturday, talking about putting together and how to do a bestseller book. Well, who's going to go to bestseller books? My target audience is subject matter experts, people who are experts in a topic. I thought, it's $97. First off, I'm a little suspicious by the price. It's a little too cheap, but for 97 bucks there are going to be at least 30 or 40 or 50 prospects for me in that room.

So yeah. Not only buy your competitors' stuff, but ask yourself, "Where are the people that you want to go to? Where do they congregate?"

Lance Tamashiro:
I think that that was one of the hardest things, and still is for me, in my business. When I started my online business, I liked the Internet because nobody was going to have to hear my voice, see my face, I got to sit in my dark basement and hit refresh on the PayPal account. There is, I guess, some truth to all of that, but what I really found is that that's sort of the way it's perceived, but in actuality, anybody that I look at that is successful online, whether they're a giant business or a solo-preneur or a medium-sized company, it's about building that relationship.

It's about doing a lot of stuff that doesn't pay off for a long time, whether that is a podcast where people get to know you more. A lot of people say to me, "Why do you do this podcast all the time? You hardly even talk a lot of it. Most of them are you interviewing other people," but I think what they don't see in it is that I'm building a relationship with a lot of people. I get questions in like, "I want to know about this." "Maybe you should have this person on." Just somebody paying attention to you and getting free information is where it's at.

I think too many people focus on, "What is my sales process?" "What is my autoresponder process?" "How do I get somebody to buy?" That is important, but I mean, podcast, YouTube, blog posts, things that you think are just a waste of time, it's like, you feel like nothing happens for a really long time, and then all of a sudden, for whatever reason, you hit some kind of critical mass where it's like, "Oh my gosh. Everybody's paying attention, and I thought nobody was."

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. It's really funny because for four years, I was number one for the term information marketing in Google. Then they changed their algorithm, and I saw a huge drop-off. I thought to myself, "What do I have to do?" I think you're right. You have to be looking at all of these different methods, whether it's podcasting, blogging, YouTube channels, Instagramming, whatever you do, just think about, "Who is the market you're going after?"

I was just thinking about how, since I've been talking to you, literally now I have, I don't know if I told you this, but one of my most recent clients that I'm signing, we're just in the process of getting things together, is a guy that's a carpenter. Did I tell you at all?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes.

Fred Gleeck:
So here's a guy who, I really like the fact that when I work with people, I'm working with a huge diversity of people, some of whom have no connection to one another, others of whom are connected. I think that people who want to work online - information or Internet marketing - are thinking that they're going to be able to stay away from people. Well, you can and make a living, but your real money is made in interacting with people. Got to.

Lance Tamashiro:
It's a thankless part of the job. I mean, I think that's the hard part, and I think that's why so many people don't do it. I know you're working with a travel guy right now that is starting a YouTube channel, and I actually have a nephew that's 10 years old that's starting a YouTube channel as well. I go and look at it, and it's like, "Man, I can't imagine starting over again," although that's what I did with my podcast when I got it started. But I watch it, and it looks so thankless. It looks so unfulfilling when I go and look and I'm like, "They got 30 views on this video." Then I think, "They got 30 views on this video," like it's brand new and they got 30 views. There is something to that hustle and that putting yourself out there.

What I know is that, for me personally, and I see so many people that want to get it all set up and make it all happen like yesterday. The thing about any business, whether online or offline, is it's a marathon. There are things that you need to put in place, and they can only happen as fast as they happen.

Building a YouTube channel, building a website, building a part-, whatever it is, the key is to recognize that we all want it to be done yesterday, and it can't be done. So setting realistic expectations about, if I do one hour a day on this, whatever this is, YouTube videos.

Maybe the first time you do a YouTube video, you say, "Five days a week I'm going to do a YouTube video." You know what? The first day it might take you an hour. It might take you an hour and a half. Day two, it might take you an hour or an hour and a half, but I guarantee you that if you stick with that for 30 days, 60 days, a year, whatever, however long you're going to commit to doing it, you will compress that hour and a half into one ta-, if you're making a five-minute video, it's going to take you six minutes to do the video and get it up on YouTube. Because the only way you can do that is by that experience, that practice, those repetitions, plus you have the advantage of now you can do it fast, but you've also built all of these assets.

Fred Gleeck:
You mentioned a guy, by the way, everyone should help TravelScrooge. TravelScrooge is a YouTube channel. Tony just started that. He's now produced about 20. The whole idea is a travel minute, giving you a tip. Five days a week, like you just said, for just over a minute. You go to TravelScrooge on YouTube, and he'll give you a great travel idea to get discount travel. His whole thing is bah humbug to overpriced travels.

So he's into showing you techniques and stuff, but again, I told him that, again, the voice over guy, Bill DeWees, it took us, we now have 11,900 people on the YouTube channel for voice over. Tony is just starting. I think he's got three people. Anybody listening to this, go there and support. It's cool stuff. You know, it's travel, but yeah. When you get, I told him, "When we get this started," I told him, "you have to look at it." It took Bill, when he first got started, I think the first year, I don't know if we even had 100 people total. Then it just started to get bigger and bigger and bigger, and that's what happens.

I think that Seth Godin wrote a book called The Dip. I don't know if you've read that.

So The Dip is that between the time that you start something and the time you get to the point where it really starts to take off, it's just fill-in golf, fill-in YouTube channel, fill-in everything. There's this huge gap between when you start something and all the crap you have to go through to the time you finally get it right, and that's called The Dip. How many people will actually tolerate the amount of time it gets to go from day one to day 365, where they go, "Okay. That five-minute YouTube video's now taking me five and a half minutes as opposed to an hour and a half." People won't do that.

Lance Tamashiro:
The way I like to look at it is they quit before the miracle happens. I mean, that's why in the business I've been running for years now, it's always the same thing. We see people come up, they make a big splash, and we just keep doing our thing, doing our thing, and doing the things that matter. Inevitably, and I see this, in all kinds of niches, and it doesn't matter whether you're talking online, whether you're talking golf, whether you're talking whatever, people want it so fast. They think they just deserve it so fast. What I like to say is, it's simple but it's not easy.

Fred Gleeck:
I like that.

Lance Tamashiro:
The reason we've been able to last as long as we can is we consistently do the things that need to be done knowing that we're going to outlast everybody. Because we're not going to burn ourselves. I mean, I watch people. They come online and they're working 18-hour days and then sleeping for two hours and going to their day job, and they're trying to do all this. I'm just like, "Slow down." You're point of building your own business is for lifestyle, not to get it done quicker. So why not just put four hours in every single day consistently.

I guarantee you, nobody believes this, but if anybody actually tracks it, if you just commit to doing four hours every five days a week, seven days a week, whatever, versus what you are doing now, make yourself breathe and go do other things, at the end of 30, 60 days, you will have gotten so much further than what you thought you were doing when you were working 18-hour days and nights and all of this other stuff.

Fred Gleeck:
When I was doing a lot of seminars, I used to use the exact same term. It's simple but it's not easy. But here's another idea that we haven't talked about on this podcast, which I've got an embarrassing admission to make, and I think other people may be in the situation. So let's try to figure out how to fix it. For many years, back in like the mid-'90s, I became the top guy in a niche. I was the top guy in the self-storage industry. Then for some unexplainable reason, I just kind of lost interest, and I let it kind of die. So I'm thinking to myself, "Wait a second. I've got all this material that I developed for them. I've got a ton of knowledge. Is there a way to revitalize something that you let go a while back? How would you do that?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think that first of all, this goes back to being connected to people. Because what I find for me personally in my business is you're going to go through those, you're going to go through that excitement, those ups and downs. If you didn't, you'd never get excited. It would just always be the same, right?

So the question is, how do you deal with those downs so that you don't walk away from it? I do think that sometimes you just need to take some R&R, whatever that is. I try to play golf. I try to go do things with my family to keep myself energized and remember why I do all this, but the more important part to me is the connections that you make with people. I think that's what keeps you energized and stuff, and I think that's where so many people go wrong. This is not an I business or a me business. Even if you're the only person that works in your company, this is a people business. I think when you realize that, that helps to energize you - staying connected with other people.

As far as revitalizing something that is dead, I mean, I think the big mistake that everybody on the Internet makes, myself included, is that we assume everybody knows everything that we've done, everybody has read everything that we've written, everybody has seen every video that we've done, heard every podcast, and the truth is, nobody cares about what you do. Nobody really pays attention. You're lucky if people pay attention to 10% of the stuff that you do. If you've got a 20, 30-minute podcast, you're lucky if 2% of the people you tell about it listen to it.

One of the biggest revelations that I've had recently is that even if they have listened, for example, we do a lot of webinars. For the most part, they don't change. They are, depending on what product we are pitching, they are canned presentations. We just pull out the old PowerPoint, give the presentation. We have customers that have been with us for four, five, six years that have seen that presentation 40 times.

Every time we do it, we're like, "Why do they keep showing up?" The answer to that is, people don't always, one, remember that they saw it, two, they always pick up something new. I mean, you're going to hear a message differently depending on where you are in your business, in your growth, in whatever it is.

Three, people like to be reinforced that what they believe is true. So if they hear your message, it kind of goes back to, there used to be an old advertising thing that said you've got to make contact seven times before you make a sale. I think part of that is not so much even just that, "I'm back again. I'm back again. You've seen my brand." I think it is that subconsciously they get a message embedded in their head of, "I've heard of this," and they start to think that it was their idea or it was the thing that they've had. So when they hear that message over and over with advertising, at some point their brain clicks and goes, "I was right. I knew that Downy was the best softener or drier pad in the market." Then they go and buy it, and they don't even know where that came from, but it's that repetition.

I think that if you've got old stuff, and one of the things I've been doing lately is-

Fred Gleeck:
In my case, I've got a ton of old stuff in that industry, so I was thinking about putting together a whole, like put it behind a paywall and just say, "Here it is. $97," or whatever it is.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I mean, I think that that's definitely a way to put it out there. I mean, make some of it free, pieces of it free. Put it out there. One of the things I've been doing is revitalizing my Twitter account. I mean, I had a Twitter account years ago that I did nothing with. What I've done in the last, I guess, 60 days or so, maybe not even that long, maybe 30 to 60 days, is I bought a service called eClincher.com. What it is is it just schedules tweets over and over. You just set up a queue and it, just every hour or whatever you set it up for, it sends out the exact same thing.

So what I've been doing is, I've just been going in and when we do a podcast, I schedule that podcast to get put out there. When I have a replay that I'm promoting in my other business, I put it in there so that it goes out there. It's crazy to me. Every single tweet gets retweeted, liked, and I'm like, "It's the same thing that I put out eight hours ago," but with Twitter especially, the timeline moves so fast that it doesn't bother people. I mean, if you did this on Facebook, people would be annoyed.

On Twitter it seems to be okay, and reusing all of that stuff, I mean, you've got a ton of content. Use it and get it out there to as many people as you can. People don't mind. I mean, I've seen Star Wars I don't know how many times. I've seen Billy Madison a million times. So think about how you consume information and know that your market is the same as you.

Fred Gleeck:
Mine is, I always ask people, "What's the movie you've watched more than any other single movie?" To me, it's Groundhog Day.

Lance Tamashiro:
Mine is Young Frankenstein.

Fred Gleeck:
Young Frankenstein. Wow. Nice.

Lance Tamashiro:
So, yeah, I think that take it out and sell it. I don't care what niche you're in or whatever, I mean. If you've got an audience or even just information, if it's sitting on your hard drive, I can tell you that you have zero chance of it doing anything for you. If you have a sales page, it can do something for you.

Fred Gleeck:
It can do something for you. Let me bring up this point, which I think is kind of interesting. I got somebody who's about to sign on as a client, and one of the things that they said was, "Hey. I really want to start doing this kind of work and doing training in my niche," etc. etc. It's kind of frustrating because they want to jump from doing the inexpensive stuff, they're thinking of the three-camera shoot in the big auditorium and having the video produced and all that stuff.

What would you say to someone like that to try and get them to understand? Because I said, "Look. Why don't we start with something like a webinar because it's super inexpensive to produce, we have virtually no cost associated with it? We make money when the first person signs up." So what do you say to the person who again is looking to jump way ahead?

Lance Tamashiro:
I think, like anything else, it's a marathon, not a sprint. I mean, my problem with the people that I see that do that, and I've had friends throughout the years that they wouldn't just do a video. I mean, I've got no problems just doing a one-take, I mean, there was one, I don't know if you saw this one, but I did a video for a class that we're currently doing. In the middle of it, my daughter came in and started talking to me and asking me for breakfast. I left it in, and the reason is is because, and I know a lot of people that would have started, they would have scrapped everything, started over, spent an hour trying to edit it.

My thing is, I see people that try to do these fancy videos or fancy audios, and the truth is, get out whatever you've got now that's easy. Because it's easy to go, "Oh, you know what would be awesome? Now I've figured out how to make a podcast. It would be cool to play some intro music at the beginning," and then add that in. "Oh, it would be cool to have a commercial," and then add that in. What most people do is they go, "I've got to have all of this stuff in place before I do anything," and what ends up happening is they do nothing.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. I don't know if you've heard my line because it sounds like, if I wouldn't have known better, it sounds like you were listening to my material from like 10 or 15 years ago. Because I always use the line, done is better than perfect, and then when producing info products, I would say, "If the dog barks, leave it in. Why? Because you look to the people that you're trying to contact as much more real and human as opposed to having every single "uh" taken out." It doesn't work.

Lance Tamashiro:
You know, one of the things I'm always real careful of is, I know some guys in the niche that I'm in that created personas for themselves that they thought were really interesting and different, and they were. I mean, they're definitely different, and I know you know of one of the guys that I'm talking about. The problem is is that they create this persona online, and then when you meet them in person, you're like-

Fred Gleeck:
It's not them.

Lance Tamashiro:
… you're like, "Who are you? Where is the guy that I've seen with this?" and "You're always in suits," or "You're always dressed this way, and now you're wearing a baseball hat or doing this thing." There is a, to me, and it's just me, and I know a lot of these guys are really successful in what they do, but to me, as a consumer, when I see that disconnect, I subconsciously think, "What else are they lying to me about?"

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely agree.

Lance Tamashiro:
So I think that you're right. That level of relatableness, that level of he said "uh." If you talk to me in real life, I say like and uh and all the things that you hear me say on the podcast because I don't edit them. There is a, I guess my thing is, be very careful about the persona that you create. It's way easier to just be the person that you are.

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely. If you're being you, you don't have to remember, "What am I supposed to be?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I see that trap so many times. It works for some people, and for some people it doesn't. I mean, I think, I just think you've got to be careful.

Fred Gleeck:
I remember the whole campaign the guy did with the rich jerk.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I'm not talking about that guy, but I mean, same thing.

Fred Gleeck:
It's kind of like people come up with these things, and I really wonder to myself, "Is this the real thing?" and then somebody will, but I've seen, I've had people come to me saying, "Oh, you know. I spent $25,000 with so-and-so, and I am in debt, and I am still paying off my credit card, and I didn't get anything out of it." I thought to myself, "My god, what did they do that convinced you to give them 25 grand and you've got nothing for it?" I think that that, in this industry, is really a problem.

Lance Tamashiro:
You know, I think, I kind of go back and forth with that. I do think there are some people that are selling things and delivering nothing. I mean, I've bought a lot of that stuff, but then there are also people that are buying things that are doing nothing.

Fred Gleeck:
True.

Lance Tamashiro:
I think that the truth in that story is probably somewhere in the middle. So it's back to the whole thing. I mean, I don't, I personally, when I see something new and exciting come in my email box, I look at it for the marketing aspect of it. I buy it if it's something that I can use today.

So, Robert and I, my business partner, Robert Plank, we have a rule that anything that we invest in has to be at least to some set degree of finished in three days because that's my excitement level. I mean, I can stay interested in something for about three days. So if I look at something and go, "Man, it would be awesome to have xyz course that I just looked at." The first thing I do is look at my calendar and go, "Do I have time to implement whatever portion of it that I want to to get my value out of it in three days?" If I don't, then it goes to the trash.

It'll come back around. I mean, it will come back around. That's a marketing tactic is for the scarcity, but what I find is, who cares if I buy something and never use it? Big deal. I mean, I've got a folder that is stuff I'm going to get to. I never get to it. I mean, who am I kidding? It just is taking up space on my drive. So if you can consume whatever it is, and if you can't, you don't need it right now. Whatever you need will show up when it's time for it to show up for you. If you believe that and have that attitude, you'll get a lot further and you'll spend a heck of a lot less money.

Fred Gleeck:
That's a good place to end today's podcast.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome. Well, as always, we appreciate you guys being here. Make sure that you tune in next week. Also, head over to iTunes, subscribe, leave a comment, rate and review. We are doing incredible over there thanks to each and every one of you. So, again, we will talk to you on the next episode of the Lance Tamashiro Show. Bye now.

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