Shift Your Thinking & Achieve Extraordinary Results – Kim Ades

Shift Your Thinking & Achieve Extraordinary Results – Kim Ades

KimAdes

Kim Ades, is the president and founder of Frame of Mind Coaching and JournalEngine Software. She's an author, speaker, entrepreneur, coach and mother of five, probably the hardest job of all of those. Kim is recognized as one of North America's foremost experts on performance through thought mastery. By using her unique process of integrating online journaling in her coaching, Kim helps her highly driven clients to examine and shift their thinking, in order to yield extraordinary results.

Kim, super happy to have you here today. How are you doing?

Kim Ades:
I'm great. I'm super happy to be here.

Lance Tamashiro:
I know. Let's talk about this, because first of all, you're all kinds of things. I think that a lot of times when people are trying to get going online, trying to amplify their business, trying to do this, it feels like we're being pulled in all of these directions. I know you've got your software company. You're an author, a speaker, a coach, building a business, a mother. Balancing all of this stuff is a lot like how people feel when they're getting started online. How do you manage all of this? With all of these things, having a software company, being a coach, building a business, was that the plan when you got started or was that just something that you fell into as it went?

Kim Ades:
Well plans are interesting things, right? Was it an intellectually crafted plan? Was it in my business outline? The answer is no. On that front, yes. I fell into it, but I would say that it is a divinely created plan, one that is uniquely suited to my strengths and who I am. You asked a question and the question was, how do you balance all of this? I have to say the balance question happens to me all the time. Clients ask it, podcasters ask it, the balance question. Here's my answer to the balance question: when you go to a park ... You know, you take your kids, you go to a park and there's a seesaw. One kid gets on the one side, the other kid gets on the other side. What happens when the seesaw is perfectly in balance?

Lance Tamashiro:
It's right in the middle and nobody has any fun.

Kim Ades:
That's right. Nothing happens, right? Nothing happens. There's no movement. There's no action. There's no thrill. There's no ride. There's no experience. It's perfectly balanced and it's very temporary, we could say. Right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah.

Kim Ades:
For me, going for balance is the wrong goal. That's the wrong goal. That's not what we're really after. What we're really after is enjoying the highs and the lows. It's going for the ride. It's experiencing the passion and the excitement of wherever you are. For me, do I have balance in my life? I have to say probably not. That's not necessarily what I'm seeking for myself. What I do is I seriously focus on where I am when I'm there. Right now, there's ... Nothing else exists except you and me.

Lance Tamashiro:
This is a super interesting point though, because I love this. You said it this way. You said, "You have to experience the highs and the lows."

Kim Ades:
That's right.

Lance Tamashiro:
You probably see this with so many of the clients that you work with, people that you watch building a business, people that are trying to accomplish any goal, and it's this. We all see this all the time. People get really excited about their business or what they're going to do or whatever that goal is, and then it doesn't work out the way that they've planned. Either it motivates them to move forward or they throw their hands up and they say, "This doesn't work. I'm not cut out for this. I'm going to give up on my dream," or whatever it is. How do you help clients manage the lows? Even how to manage the highs, because I think that both are equally important, as far as expectations and management of those. These two things can both get us in a real sense of trouble. I think that's why you probably get asked about balance so often, because it almost feels like the safe place to be, although you're right, there is no movement happening if you're there.

Kim Ades:
Well it's a great question. I'll tell you, I just got off a coaching call a few minutes ago with someone who is actually rather successful but experienced what she would call a significant failure about seven years ago in her business career. Like a really big, for her, a big low. Seven years later, she's still carrying it with her in her current experience. That experience has caused her to be a little more careful, a little more trepidation, taking fewer risks, really preventing her from building her current business to the size that she would have always dreamed for it to be. What I do with my clients is I examine those past events and say, "What is the meaning that you've extracted from those past events? What's the story you tell about those past events?"

You had a poor experience. How does it reflect upon you? That question is super important, because the meaning we attribute to our past experiences will determine what happens in the future. Very often, we invent or we ascribe meaning that is completely fictitious and usually puts ourselves ... Paints us in a bad light and causes us to feel a sense of debilitation and paralysis. The truth of the matter is we've invented it. One of the inventions we've made is if we've failed in the past, there's a high likelihood we'll fail in the future. That's not true. That's an invention.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love the way that you put this. It's the experience was the experience, and we tell these stories about it. For me personally, not just in business but in anything that I'm trying to accomplish, that's the value that I really see in a coach, a third party observer, somebody to bounce stuff off of. Because if I get left by myself with my own thoughts and what I do, it's weird how ... I don't know if it's our society or the way that I was brought up or the way that we're all brought up. I tell bad stories about my failures and I tell bad stories about my successes. If something successful happens, "Oh, I was in the right place at the right time," or, "It wasn't the hard work that I put into it. It wasn't all of these." Sometimes there was some ounce of luck, but I put myself in that position.

I tend to tell negative stories as a default, both to positive things and negative things that have happened to me. The value for me of having a coach is that I can bounce that out there and say, "This is how I'm thinking about this." A lot of times, having somebody else go, "You're being ridiculous about this. Here's how it's going to help you. Here's the positive we can extract from it," helps me overcome, and more importantly, move forward in a positive light, how you're talking about with your clients.

Kim Ades:
Well then what you're really eluding to is this, and this is what I talk about all day and all night, is it's your thinking that will determine what you will achieve fundamentally. Very often, our needs are [inaudible 00:07:21] when we want to achieve something is, "Let's create a plan. Let's create an action plan. Let's start doing things." Right? "Let's get into a state where our actions ..." We've all heard of the concept of take massive action, right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes.

Kim Ades:
You can't get anything done until you do. You can't accomplish anything until you take action. My advice is before you start taking massive action, identify the thoughts that are going to get in your way of succeeding with your action.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah.

Kim Ades:
Clean those up. Then start to take action, because now your action will be much more lined up with your goals and nothing will get in your way. If you think to yourself, "Man, I failed in the past. I don't know if I can do it. I don't think I'm equipped. Yeah, fine. I've had some successes, but they were all due to luck." All that conversation actually serves to slow you down more than any other factor. That conversation needs to get addressed and cleaned up and [inaudible 00:08:21] right away.

Lance Tamashiro:
It's so funny, because ... I don't know if it's always been this way, but it seems like in my lifetime and especially with business or whether it's golf or whatever it is that I'm trying to learn, we live in this society where information is packaged to us in systems. Right? They say, "If you want to learn how to build a business, follow these step-by-steps." Then you'll get to the business part. For me personally what happens is I follow those steps, that recipe, and something goes wrong along the way or the outcome doesn't happen exactly the way that I envisioned in my head. The first thing I think is, "It doesn't work." Then I think, "Well, there's an art and a science, right? I learned the science. That's the system. Now I've got to apply this. Why didn't this work for me? Is it my mindset? Is it something I did different? Is it because I'm in a different niche? How can I tweak this?"

I see so many people that get stuck on they're following something, step by step. Usually building a business. Something goes wrong and they think, "This doesn't work," or, "This doesn't work for me." How do you deal with clients that are in that state of mind, where, "I did it. It doesn't work." Or, "Try AdWords." "I did AdWords. I tried paid traffic. It doesn't work. I tried selling my thing here. It doesn't work." How do you get them over that, to realize that maybe it's not necessarily the system, but how they're approaching it or thinking about it?

Kim Ades:
Let me tell you a story and then I'll come back to your question, okay? The other day ... I live in Toronto, and in Toronto, we have this massive subway system. My 16-year-old daughter was getting together with friends. She went downtown. We have these board game cafes. She went into this board game café and she had to be home at a certain hour. She headed back to the subway and the door she went in was locked. She couldn't get into the subway. All of a sudden, she panicked a little bit, but she ended up calling home and speaking to my husband. She said, "I'm lost. I can't find the entrance to the subway. Can you help me?" The first question that he asked is, "Where are you now? What do you see around you? What direction are you pointed in? What do you see across the street? Where are you now?"

Because if all of a sudden, he just said, "Here are the instructions. Take three steps forward, two steps to the right. Hang a left over there." Who knows where she would have ended up?

Lance Tamashiro:
Right.

Kim Ades:
The first and most important question is, where are you now? What do you see around you? His job was to orient her to have her pointing in the right direction. This is the biggest problem that I see over and over again when people try to implement systems. "Here's the formula for maps of online success," is that people don't understand where they're pointed to begin with. They start to follow the steps, but fundamentally, they're headed in the wrong direction. My job is to say, "Hold on a minute. Stop taking all this crazy action, this chaotic dizziness. Let's slow down for a minute and let's see where you're pointed. Let's make sure you're pointed in the right direction." What the means is in coaching language, "Let's clean up the thoughts that are causing problems for you, that are causing a slowdown, that are getting in the way. Let's have you pointed in the right direction. Once you're pointed in the right direction, all the actions that you need to take A, will happen naturally, B, will yield positive results."

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean I almost get this ... As you're talking about this, I get this visualization almost of a slingshot, you know? You're pointed in the wrong direction. Your trajectory is wrong. I love how you say your job as a coach is to get you pointed in the right direction and then let you run with all of that action, because you're going to get where you want to go.

Kim Ades:
Exactly. Meanwhile, what we see is all these people are running around in circles in a frenzy, going, "Why am I not getting to where I want to go?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Because I think we've all felt that way, right? I just know I've got to do something to succeed, so I'll just do whatever next thing shows up in my inbox.

Kim Ades:
That's right. I cannot over emphasize this concept that action follows thought. First we think, then we act. When our actions don't yield the right results, then what we need to do is say, "Okay, how is my thinking creating these outcomes?" What people tend to do is start taking different actions. You've heard the expression, "If you always did what you always do, what you always did, you'll get what you've always got." You've heard that one before. It's flawed. The flaw is this, that if we replace the concept of action with thought ... If we say it like this, "If you always think what you always thought, you'll always get what you always got." Our job is to start to ask ourselves one vital question. It's, "How am I thinking about this that is causing for me a slowdown?"

Lance Tamashiro:
I love this.

Kim Ades:
Right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah.

Kim Ades:
Now if we think about ... Here's another great example. When we look at a dog and we want the dog to wag its tail, we don't grab the tail and shake. Right? That's not what we do. Except that's what a lot of people do when they want to achieve their goals.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, I agree.

Kim Ades:
Right? They're attacking it from the wrong end of the spectrum.

Lance Tamashiro:
It makes perfect sense when you don't know what you don't know.

Kim Ades:
Correct.

Lance Tamashiro:
Like trying to get the tail to wag. I'm going to wag the tail.

Kim Ades:
That's right.

Lance Tamashiro:
Man, I think that if people think about this and look at these things, it totally does help. Now the million dollar question, right? Maybe this is not something we can answer right now, but hopefully there's something that we can get people pointed in the right direction, is at the end of all of this, the real answer is you've got to be honest enough with yourself to answer the question, right? To answer it honestly. How am I thinking about this that is either serving me or not serving me? How can somebody know that they're being honest with themselves enough or come up with a real honest answer to this question?

Kim Ades:
Well, look. I'm going to give you three things that I've seen for entrepreneurs who are super successful. It's three thinking strategies. For whoever is listening, you might want to write this down. These thinking strategies are what top entrepreneurs use over and over again. It's their go to. It's their knee jerk place. Thing number one is when they're experiencing a challenge, for example, they ask themselves the first question, which is, "What belief do I have? What do I believe to be true about this particular situation that is causing me to experience these outcomes? How can I start to challenge those beliefs in order to get other outcomes?" What it boils down to is, "How am I thinking about this that is causing me a slowdown? What belief do I have?" The word 'belief' is important.

For example, a lot of entrepreneurs believe that they don't have enough money, right? They don't have enough money and they can't start their business. That's where they get stuck. The belief is there's a limited amount of money and they can't go elsewhere to start or that they need a certain amount of money before they can get started. All those things are things we invent. We make them up.

Lance Tamashiro:
Right.

Kim Ades:
We create limitations for ourselves. How am I thinking about this in a limited fashion that's getting in my way? That's question number one. What do I believe to be true, that I can challenge? Question number two is, what resources are available to me that I haven't considered? We have resources that we don't think are available to us. I'll give you an example. I coached a rabbi in the city, quite a formidable rabbi. He was brought in because he wanted to bring in more young families into the congregation. At the time, when I started coaching him, the congregation was struggling financially. He said, "You know, I just can't do it all by myself." I said, "Well what about finding some help?" He said, "We can't afford it. I can't go spend money now, when we're in financial difficulty." I said, "Who said you have to spend money to hire help? Maybe there's some volunteers available. Maybe there are some people in the community who would be more than willing to help. Maybe there are some resources, some experts, some talent that you're not tapping into."

The moment he started thinking along those lines, the moment he was able to access volunteers who were more than willing to help. What resources are available to me that I never thought of? The third thing is, what do I want? What these entrepreneurs do is they focus on what they want without getting distracted. I have to say people ... As human beings, we get distracted really, really easily. What these entrepreneurs do is they build the muscle of constantly pivoting back to what it is that they want. It's not that they never get distracted. They get distracted, but they come back fast. "What do I want? Oh yeah. That's where I'm going. Oh yeah." They keep turning themselves towards what it is they want.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love all of this stuff, especially the first one, because I think the limiting beliefs is where people that I watch struggling never can even get themselves in a position to worry about number two or number three. Right?

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
If you stop with, "I don't have the money," then who cares about the other stuff? You're done. Go do something else if that's honestly what you believe. It's like they must know that it's not true or they wouldn't continue beating their head against the wall about wanting to be an entrepreneur, right?

Kim Ades:
Right.

Lance Tamashiro:
Somewhere, they know that it's not true. I think that what I like about the limiting beliefs is almost everyone that you see people talk about ... The big ones that come to mind for me are money, skill and knowledge, or time. Right? I mean money, you went through everything with that. Time, we all have the same amount of time. You've got five kids. I know how it is just for two kids and having a wife that handles the majority of it, but all of us don't have time. The question is how to become more efficient and find the time, and then also finding the skill sets. That's all learned. We all start in the same places. I think that that's such a big one. Even just acknowledging that we have these limiting beliefs, whatever they may be, that are stopping us.

It puts us in a position to make a decision. Is this a belief I'm going to work through or is this true for me? If it is, you're probably not going to get to the goal that you want to get to, or you need a good coach to get you through that mental block that you've got, if it's something you truly want to do.

Kim Ades:
Well let's look at the one where you talked about time, right? It's not only becoming more efficient with time. It's really addressing the thinking that says, "Here are all of the things that I have to do." I have to tell you, most entrepreneurs don't have to actually do most of what they take on.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes.

Kim Ades:
It's really about looking at someone's thinking. The other thing is the concept of outsourcing, the concept of delegation, the concept of really focusing on those two or three core actions that will lead to the outcomes they're looking for, rather than getting involved and engaged with a million things they think they should do. Even the question of timing isn't just about managing the moving parts. It's all about thinking. All of it.

Lance Tamashiro:
How would somebody ... Because a lot of this ... I get overwhelmed when I think about big goals. When I started my business at zero, my first goal was $3,000, then it was like $10,000, all of these goals. I couldn't stop thinking about, "I want to make $100,000 a year." Or, "I want to make $200,000 a year." What happens in my head is I get overwhelmed with the bigger goal. Does that make sense?

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
All I can focus on is, "I want to make a quarter of a million dollars," or whatever that number is. $10,000 a month, whatever it is that I put in my head. What I've found when I was getting started was that that big goal overwhelmed me almost to the point that I couldn't move. Why would I do something that makes me $5 when my goal is $10,000 a month? Logically, I know that if I make $5 X amount of times, I'll get there, but I don't know if it's my ego or my brain or my overwhelm. I'm always looking for what I don't have rather than what I do have, that can get me there.

Kim Ades:
Well that's an interesting thing. That's what we do. It's not just you. A lot of people do. They focus on what's missing rather than what they have, right? That's not an uncommon tendency, but the issue is this, is that why do big goals overwhelm us? Because they seem so far away. They seem so difficult for us to achieve. They seem so just such a stretch. It's really at the end of the day, a belief. Do I believe it's possible to reach this goal? If at the end of the day, it's just too far away, then what we want to do for people is say, "Okay, you know what? That's great. We're glad that you have that goal, but if you fundamentally believe that you can't achieve this goal, let's move the target." Targets are movable at all times, right? We want people to take manageable bites in their thinking. Not in their actions. In their thinking.

Lance Tamashiro:
Nice. Yeah. What I like about this ... I think you put it the best way, is these targets are movable.

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
I think that there's so many times that people go, "Well, I told so and so I was going to make a $10,000 a month business, so that's it." It's like, "Well, how about must make a $3,000 a month business?" That's something you can reach. I know for me, through my journey in building stuff, having a coach, having a mastermind group, having other people to look at me and say, "You're thinking like ..." I can't always see it myself. I love that there's these questions and I hope everybody wrote these things down. "What do I believe to be true that I can challenge? What resources do I have available? What do I really want, so that I can stop getting distracted?"

Write those things down and stick them on a sticky pad. Because really, if you can ... Whenever you're feeling demotivated, whenever you feel you're off track, if you can answer those three questions and your answers stay the same ... Not for what's limiting you. That should go away, but what you want and where you're distracted, that's what's going to push you through that and keep you on track for when you feel overwhelmed. Right?

Kim Ades:
Well that's exactly it. Honestly, one of the things that we do when we coach people is we ask them to journal in an online journal every single day. They share their journal with their coach. Again, for whoever is listening, pick up a journal or find an online journal and come. We can introduce you to ours. Journaling is a huge, huge powerful tool that will help in the process of self-reflection and just starting to become aware of how your thinking operates and starting to understand how your thinking sometimes propels you forward, but very often just gets in your way. Getting ahold of that is the single most effective method of reaching your goals.

Lance Tamashiro:
Can you talk about this a little bit? Just when you say to go ahead and journal, what should people be writing down? What should people be tracking? I agree with you. I think if you could have ... I wish I had everything that I had ever thought or did or wrote down over the last 10 years to look at and go, "Oh, you think like ..." You can start to see these patterns, but what are people supposed to be keeping track of? How long should this take them every day?

Kim Ades:
Well it could take anywhere from five to ten minutes to a half an hour. It doesn't really matter. Every day is going to be different, depending on what's going on and how you're feeling about what's going on. I have a very, very simple and basic formula for people who want to journal. The formula is this. Use your journal to unload. I use a funny way of putting it, but it's dump, dump and then dump the dump. What does that mean? It means unload. Put it down. Write it down. Whatever is frustrating you, worrying you, causing you confusion, whatever it is, write it down. When you think you're done, keep going so it's completely on paper or online or whatever. Just get rid of it. Then at the end of your journal, what you want to say is, "Okay." You want to write the words down, "Okay, it's time to turn myself around."

At the end of your journal, remind yourself what it is that you really want. Write it again. "Here's where I'm headed. Here's where I'm going. Here's what I want. Here's what I look forward to. Here are some of the things I'm going to do and think about in order to get there." Always end your journal reminding yourself where you're going. Again, that's the idea about building that internal muscle, the pivoting muscle that helps you go to where you want to go instead of going where the ocean floats you. Right? It's really an important concept right there.

Now one of the things we do is we have a course that we offer called FOM, Frame of Mind Essentials. Really it's a self-guided journaling program. It's fairly affordable, but you get a journaling prompt every three days. The prompts help you think about things that you haven't thought of before. You get to submit your journals to a coach for review and you get some coaching along the way, too. It's a really great, easy, affordable method to get coached, where you're guiding the process yourself.

Lance Tamashiro:
Right. What I love about that with the prompts and basically ... What I'm getting from how you described this is every three days, they get a prompt like ... I'm just going to make this up, like, "Where did you struggle today? What did you do well? What's holding you back? What do you believe about ..." They fill that in.

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
That then goes to a coach, and then the coach gives them some feedback to help them out. They get the benefit of the journaling, the dump, dump and then dump some more unloading, but also some third party outside coaching and looking all built into one. When you say that they dictate how the coaching happens, it's because it starts with the journaling and where they're at at all times.

Kim Ades:
That's right. They get to choose a journal or two every month that they can submit to a coach. On top of that, they get a podcast. I'm the one who does the podcast, where I use cases and I provide some coaching for those cases. Those cases are very universal. It could be somebody who just got into a major fight with their spouse. Show me one person who never had a fight with their spouse.

Lance Tamashiro:
Not me. Definitely.

Kim Ades:
Right. What do you do in that case? It's very universal. They listen to the podcast and they say, "Man, I could use that advice. I know exactly what to do with that. I know a person." It's just very, very applicable. You're getting all kinds of levels here. In addition, you're coaching in a community where you might read and respond to one another's journals. That's very helpful, too. You're getting a lot of input. You're getting a lot of people who are looking at your thinking and providing you with feedback.

Lance Tamashiro:
You know, Kim, one of the things that I love about your message, the way that you do this ... I've interviewed a lot of coaches, business people and stuff, is that you are one of the most clear people in your system. I love how much you stress that it starts at your beliefs and getting pointed in the right direction, because I agree with this completely. I watch people that struggle. I'm in a great place to watch people struggle. This is sad to say. It's not that I like to watch, but I like to see what holds people back. On Facebook, all of the time, where something goes wrong and they almost do your dump, dump and dump some more on Facebook. What I see happening is that everybody piles on with them, right? They go, "Oh yeah." A whole bunch of people start wallowing in their misery.

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
What I like about what you do with the Frame of Mind Essentials is that they still get to do the dump, dump and dump some more, but then it gets turned into a positive. Then it's done, right? "Okay, I've got this out of here. Now it's time for me to decide what I really want and how to overcome this." I see so many people getting stuck on social media with the negative attitudes and everybody cosigning on their misery whereas what you've got is basically that same kind of system, except that once it's out there, your negativity is done. It's now, "How do we solve this problem?"

Kim Ades:
Right. This is our very lightest version of coaching. Of course there are other types of coaching that we do where it becomes more intimate, more intense, where you're hiring a coach to work with you one on one. We're really, really working with you every single day and reading your journals and digging into your thinking and helping you clear out the kind of thinking that's really, really preventing you from moving forward and reaching your goals. It's almost like magic. The distance that clients travel in a relatively short period of time is astonishing, absolutely astonishing.

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean I know that in my own journey, once I figured out that it wasn't completely about systems, that it wasn't completely about anybody can build a business, even though everybody can, that it was more about the way that I was approaching things, more the way that I looked at things and the things that I believed. I know for myself personally, I made huge leaps. Those are the times when I make the biggest leaps and bounds. When I do what you said is number one. When I challenge what I believe to be true and then get rid of that. It's crazy how if you don't do this exercise, in 60 days, how these beliefs just build back up in your head and they hold you back.

Kim Ades:
That's right.

Lance Tamashiro:
I know that what you're talking about absolutely works. If somebody is listening to this and they want to find out about this Frame of Mind Essentials, they want to find out about what you do, the things that you talk about and maybe even are interested in coaching, how can somebody find out about these things?

Kim Ades:
The absolute best thing to do, and it's the best thing to do because it is risk-free, cost-free, and it delivers value without any strings attached, is to go to Frame of Mind Coaching. Right there on the front page is the opportunity fill out an assessment. It's not the kind of assessment that spits out a report like you would find on Facebook, but it's a series of questions. There are two types of questions. One type just gives us a snapshot of where you are right now on a variety of areas in your life. The second kind of questions are journaling questions. What you do is you fill that out.

This is your opportunity to say, "Here's where I am right now." The same as I described with my daughter, right? "Here's where I am right now. Here is where I'm pointing." That assessment goes to a coach who reads and sets up an appointment with you to review your assessment. Those calls, [inaudible 00:32:44] by themselves will create traction for you, will help you move forward. Of course we want to invite you into coaching, but it's not mandatory. You don't have to do it. Those calls alone will create forward movement, will make a difference for you all by themselves. That's the first and most important thing that I would encourage anybody to do, is go to Frame of Mind Coaching and take that assessment.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome. I agree. I think that everybody should go check out this frameofmindcoaching.com. Fill it out and get the assessment. I think that the value in just figuring out where you're at, the value in having somebody look at this ... If you've never done this kind of thing and you've never had coaching or you haven't had coaching that is so targeted on these beliefs and moving you forward, this is something that everybody and everybody listening needs and should take advantage of. You can check that out again at frameofmindcoaching.com.

Kim, I super appreciate you taking the time to be here today. Like I said, I love your message. I love the way that you do this coaching. Maybe we can have you back again, but it's been great having you on here. Hope you have ag reat day.

Kim Ades:
Well, it's an absolute pleasure. Thank you so much for the opportunity.

Lance Tamashiro:
All right. Thank you, everybody. As always, thank you for listening to the Lance Tamashiro Show. We look forward to talking to you on the next episode. Have a great day. Bye now.

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