Business Mindset, Productivity & Dave Fennoy Seminar – Fred Gleeck

Business Mindset, Productivity & Dave Fennoy Seminar – Fred Gleeck


Business Mindset, Productivity, Product Creation & Dave Fennoy Seminar

Lance Tamashiro:
Hey, everybody. Welcome back to the Lance Tamashiro show. It is Thursday, we are back with Fred Gleeck. Fred, how are things going? I know you got a lot of exciting stuff coming up here soon?

Fred Gleeck:
I do have a lot of exciting stuff, but first off you got to understand Lance is doing this like a troop or even though his kid is super sick, and he's feeling pretty crappy but you know what? Sometimes, you just got to motor through it. I mean that's how you have to do it.

There are a lot of great things going on and I'll tell you, I'm still excited to be here regardless of how I feel or how you feel but I actually feel great. Let's go.

Lance Tamashiro:
All right. An interesting thing about motoring through or doing whatever else is I've mentioned a couple of times on the show, I kind of live my calendar day to day. I rarely even know what day it is. I do it differently where if there's there something that I have to do an appointment like do this, it's on my calendar.

I don't jumble up my calendar with other things, so I might have one or two things on my calendar a day maybe. Maybe five a week, something like that. In my head, there are things that are not negotiable so I don't cancel things on my calendar. My theory is as an entrepreneur business person is, if I get in the habit of canceling appointments I tell myself it's okay to be unmotivated and okay to not do things.

Just one of those weird little productivity hack as somebody that works at home is if you get in that habit of quitting something off, you will. If you get in the habit of ignoring your calendar, you will. For me, my calendar is one of those things that something only goes on it when it is a must do. Everything else is negotiable, but if it's on the calendar it gets done period.

I think that's like a great way to approach, so it's not motoring through. It's for an hour, or half hour I need to get on the ball and do this period.

Fred Gleeck:
I think it's a great idea. Now, one of the things I wanted to talk about today specifically that had to do with an issue of we're having right now is obviously I'm promoting a big event coming up June 10th through the 12th. It's a small event with only 16 people maximum.

Again, it's in surprise, surprise, the voice over niche. One of the things that I'm trying to do is figure out because we've got an event for $777 maximum 16 people, and we're going to do two free webinars. We're going to entice people to sign up for this event. My question is we're using lead pages as a method to put up an attractive good looking page to get people to sign up.

It's going to be what is it? It will be a week from today. My question to you is we've got a pretty big lists of people that he has in social media, what's our best way do you think to promote the free webinar and the hopes of getting people to come to the paid event?

Lance Tamashiro:
What I would do is definitely, obviously the social media. You guys are already on. Get Facebook ads running, because you can target other major people in the voice over industry. You can target other groups, what people are interested in. If you do that targeting to the demographic you're looking in and even, I know that your event is in Los Angeles and one of the things, I mean awesome place because there's already huge voice over market there.

You might even be able to fill it without bringing in people from the outside, although I'm sure a lot of people will want to come. With Facebook, you can even target people in the LA area. I would run two different sets, I would run LA area, and then US area, and then obviously the social media marketing.

Fred Gleeck:
Given the popularity, this guy's name Dave Fennoy and he's like a rock star in people who are doing video games, and that's what it's specifically for. Do you think that it's necessary to the Facebook advertising to start or see if we can fill up ourselves without any advertisement, I suspect that's the case?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think always, the good thing is, is you've got time on your side at this point. I'm a big believer too like if you're going to do an event, when we do ours we like to start figuring it out and trying to fill it six months ahead of time if possible. We'll do that by adding it with bonuses, sending out initial e-mails to our list just to see the response, and what we need to tweak and do.

I would definitely say, with 16 people the following that this person has, you might just fill the thing because of who he is. We kind of talked about this before but three days at 777 with a person like this, I mean this is a no brainer. You can't even really get personalized coaching in ... I mean you're talking about 24 hours of personalized coaching with one of the top people in the industry.

Fred Gleeck:
That's why I'm [crosstalk 00:04:54] a little bit, the Friday of that is only a three hour event, so it's a little bit less but plenty though.

Lance Tamashiro:
20 hours?

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
20 hours of coaching for 700 bucks, you're not going to find that anywhere. I position it that way where you break it down as the typical voice over coach charges a $150 per hour. He would charge $400 or whatever his rate is because he's not the typical guy and then say, you're getting it at this. This is a no brainer and it's focused on, on this.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. Now, what we're probably going to do though is go out to the social media and the list first. I suspect it's going to filled, if it doesn't fill then we'll do the Facebook.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think always, I mean I think that's the way that we like to look at it is your house assets that you've got, then paid advertising, joint ventures, those things. You've given yourself enough time to walk through those. Though one thing that I will say with your lead pages stuff and I'm sure you can do this, you might need to contact them to find out is do that ad wall retargeting as they're hitting the lead pages?

There's no cost if you end up using it, but you've built a list of people in ad world that you can advertise really cheap all over the internet where at anytime you can go in and just say, "These people clicked over. They were interested in Dave Fennoy's training, you can show ads all around the internet for really cheap. If you don't use it, doesn't matter. You've still got that thing built up over there as well.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, because if they've clicked on it, we know they have some level of interest so therefore that whole retargeting makes a lot of sense.

Lance Tamashiro:
Exactly.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, it's great. I think that's a good idea. I'm going to do that and we will report the result. Let's talk a little bit about what happened last night, even in your scale of the infirmity. We were still able to motor through a question and answer session which was the last one for this event. Again, I do have more niches than voice over too. I mean it's kind of funny.

We did the last and final Q&A and I got to say, we went for two hours and people again were delighted. How would you assess what happened throughout this whole thing?

Lance Tamashiro:
This, I actually love doing this. I've never done anything outside of the niche that I've been in. I was petrified to do it because of the adversity that we had, I mean people are rooting for us to fail. I mean that's the bottom line and they were waiting to be able to say, "We told you so" to everybody that purchased.

There was a lot of pressure, more pressure than I've ever felt selling. This wasn't an extremely high ticket product, but you know when I've done way higher ticket stuff, I felt way less pressure than what I had felt for this one. I was amazed, I mean it was something that I enjoyed. This project is something that I want to keep alive because it's turned into this pasion project.

I got to meet a whole bunch of new people and what was nice for me, I talked about it last night, and it was something that I didn't even realized going into this or even realizing until about three weeks into this program. The missing piece in voice over industry is that they're not teaching people business.

I think that we really because of how we top class and focused on the business aspect of it, regardless if they apply it or not to voice over, they can apply it somewhere. It stood out to me like a [sore thumb 00:08:33], and watching these people transform from people that knew how to sign up for paid a place sites and audition, or make a great voice over into becoming business people and thinking like business. I mean that was the most satisfying thing part of the entire experience for me.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. I agree. There was a lot of energy and again, I think that we really, really enjoyed over delivering on value from what people were expecting. I got another idea here that I want to run by you. One of the things that people who are listening to the podcast have probably experienced, and I have experienced recently.

Want to get your feedback on this. Is it when my whole business model now is geared towards getting people on board as joint venture partners. I do that through the site called fredpersonalbootcamp.com. That's where I send people to try and see whether or not they're interested in first spending three days with me one on one and then making a decision as to whether or not we should move on together.

Recently, I've bumped into some people one-on-one just like at the coffee shop or whatever, who end up being potential joint venture partners. I recently had a guy who I think I told you about who's a carpenter and we're going to put together this whole thing. What happened is all of a sudden he started to just not do what we said he was going to do. He fell off the radar.

I'm wondering, I mean it's kind of like with a dating situation. I don't want to keep after this guy because if he's not interested enough to follow up, then that means he's probably not the right person. How do you think?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. Let's see, how am I going to put this the correct way? My personal philosophy is to cut my loses as soon as possible. My experience in business not just the one that I run with Robert or the stuff that we've been doing together is that 99% of people think they want to be in business, and think they want to do what's going to happen.

The truth is, is that a very small percentage of them really want to do the work. What they're really looking for is a free ride and for you to do the work for them. As soon as they figure out that there's work involved, then they're off looking for the next get rich quick scheme.

The funny part about it is if they'd spend the energy actually doing something will and putting in the work, that they're putting into looking for this get rich quick scheme, they'd be way further ahead than they were way faster. My experiences is that, as soon as I get any kind of red flag about you're not willing to put in the time, you're not willing to show up.

I had an appointment with you on my calendar, and you didn't show up. I'm done. I don't have time because I'm looking for the people that are looking to better themselves period.

Fred Gleeck:
That person did this to me basically kind of blew off an appointment, didn't show up. Now, the question is do you provide someone like that with a second chance? If they come back and say, "Here's what's going on with my life. I have a lot of stuff going on. Let's re-invigorate this, let's redo this."

Lance Tamashiro:
I think you got to have the feel for the person. I'm a little bit jaded on this because of my experience with Robert. Here's something crazy and I hope he's okay with ... I'm going to share it in as vague of terms as I can. We actually when we did our first high ticket product together, it was a thousand dollar course.

This was back in 2009 I believe, and the day that we were supposed to do the first course, he was suppose to teach the first module. He had a major life changing event happen that morning. Unexpected, couldn't do it, and I was like, "Don't worry about it. I got it. We'll work this out. We'll make it happen, you go deal with this thing that you need to have dealt with."

I watched this guy pull up his boot straps, go deal with what he needed to do. I was like, "I'm going to take care of this. Don't worry." Came back, did his thing and then went back and dealt with his thing. It was as if it never happened. Because of that, I mean I was like, "This guy is dedicated to his business. This guy understands things in life happen and it's going to do this."

I can't say that under the circumstances, I would have done the same thing that he did. Because of that, that experience that I went through I kind of feel like nobody really has legitimate excuse especially at the last minute.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. I think you're right. I think we tend to make excuses for people and they'll make excuses for themselves all the time and lots of times. Those are just completely be as a legitimate because you're right, people just want the result, they don't want to do the work.

Lance Tamashiro:
My thing is that if two people or three people or how many people decide that at 9:00 on Thursday we're going to meet and do X, Y, Z. One person cancels, it makes me feel like when somebody does that to me, it makes me feel like, "Your time is more valuable than mine?"

What you said is you block off the time and then I'm going to change the plans on you and that never really goes away with me. I always have that sort of why did you think your time was more important than my time?

Fred Gleeck:
Here's another non-related to that item that I think is worth sort of talking about. I've had this idea for a while, but I've got a lot of over the years I've produced just tons over probably literally over 2,000 various kinds of audio programs. Some short, some long, but a lot of stuff. I produced just a crap other stuff.

My question is this, so I've got this one program and I thought on interviewing and I've got this site called expertinterviewer.com that people can go to. Here's the model, people can go to for free. They can hear the program, they can the transcript. I'm having the transcripts done. My only purpose is to put it out there for people to go through the material and it's pretty old.

There's a lot of timeless stuff there as well. For people to go through the program at the end of the program, feel like I know what talking about with regards to this area and click on the link, and then put into a list to be considered for something else. What do you think of this idea of just putting up a site where everything there is free?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I'm all for that. I think you can't give away enough free stuff.

Fred Gleeck:
The question that people are listening is "Okay, that's great. How do we monetize it?" What do you tell people in terms of the monetization of the site like that?

Lance Tamashiro:
In your case with the interviewing type of stuff, I mean your goal is to get people into your one-on-one program. Somebody goes, "How do I go from interviewing into now you're in my one-on-one joint venture or coaching program?" I think that the part that people don't always get is that when you teach somebody something, there's a couple of things that happen.

One, either your information sucks and they're never going to come back. Two, they're going to go, "Wow, that was the best thing that I've ever ... That experience was amazing. I don't care what your next thing is, I just want to contact you, you tell me what the next thing is and here's my wallet I'm ready to buy."

Three, they hear it and they go, "That was the best thing I've ever heard. What do I do now?" They want to contact you. It's different. The second and third thing are totally different. You get some people that they're just like, "I want to buy that" because of the feeling that they got from it, or that excitement.

The third people, or people that went out and implemented it or said, "Okay, I get how this interviewing stuff works. I get how this is. How can I apply it to myself?" This applies. The interviewing model would have applied to your carpenter guy, will apply to a voice over guy, will apply to a business guy, will apply to therapist, will apply to a doctor.

I think that, that interview type model really takes people that are in other professions and shows them how to leverage that knowledge into information products in the leveraging more money.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. This all starts with where I'm sitting around there and I'm sure you [got it 00:17:25], I think Robert mentioned this one time to me. I'm sitting around, I get this idea and it's like I go reserve to many names. I had another one having to do with, because I think a lot of people I looked online and there's a fair amount of interest for people understanding. Because I've done like, I think I'm up to book number 19 in terms of the number of books I have published.

I had the same the same thing I wanted to do with the book which is show people the steps on how to do it. Again, I think they'll do the same thing which they'll take one of two, or three different reactions to that. Again, I don't think you can giveaway to people. Why is it that people are so scared to giveaway stuff for free?

Lance Tamashiro:
I think that what happens is that we ... I don't know, I mean I honestly don't know. The book thing for example I think is a perfect example. I think Robert on his YouTube channel has a video promoting our publishing course. It's like an hour long and he'd literally goes through every step of going from your manuscript to having it published on like Kindle as eBook on CreateSpace as a hardback book.

I think he even like somewhere shows how to turn it into a DVD and all of this other stuff. If you watch that course, and know all the steps on how he got there. I mean he doesn't leave anything out, he does it in real time. It's like, "Here's my manuscript. Here's how I do that." That video sells our course awesome.

The reason is, is because for people which sells our products in general awesome but there's two types of people that watch it. There are people that have a manuscript, and they're looking on YouTube to figure out how to get that. They go, "Oh my gosh, this guy just walked me through step by step exactly how to take my manuscript." They got a result.

Now, they're interested in what else we have because they've seen how he teaches, they see that nothing is left out, and in their head, they're thinking, "If this is the free stuff. I got to see what the other stuff." I got a result that nobody else would give me. There's the people that are going, "I got an idea for a book and they see that there is all of the steps and they're like, I could follow this if I had a manuscript," then they want to buy the course to find out how to come up with their manuscript.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. I think that's one of the things that people miss a lot which is often times people giveaway information for free and they don't make it very good. Because they figure, "This is my free stuff. I'm not going to give you the really good stuff." What a ridiculous thing to do.

I always tell people, "You better make your free stuff really, really good." Because people will say, if your free stuff is crap, why would I pay money for your "real stuff?"

Lance Tamashiro:
I think the mistake that people make, I agree. Your free stuff has to be as good as everything else. I think that what people think is good is production value. What they get hang up on is I got to edit out my ums, I got to fix my, oh I made a mistake, I got to go back and fix that. They spent hours and hours doing all of this editing.

That's not what make something good. What make something good is the information, not the production quality. Your production quality will get better. I'm a big proponent of get it out there, get it out there fast. I'm not going to edit out that um by the way. Get it out there fast, and if the information is good. It's better if you leave that in because that's how you talk anyway.

If you make mistakes, show people how to recover from them because chances are they're going to make that same mistake you did.

Fred Gleeck:
As sort of a final point to talk about here, I wanted to talk to you about the fact that I brought this up with Dave Fennoy yesterday on a conversation with him which is we're talking about this small group of 16 people we're obviously going to be recording it. We're going to be recording it video only wise.

I said to him a line that I've used for 25 years which is people will always forgive even in this industry to get voice overs. Poor production quality, they will never forgive poor content.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think that's a perfect place to end and I think that, that is what everybody should take for here. Product content is always better than production quality. You can build a huge following with more production quality and great content.

Fred Gleeck:
You got it.

Lance Tamashiro:
All right. As always we, appreciate you guys being here. Hey, if you get a chance, please make sure that you head over to iTunes give us a rating and review, subscribe to us, and we will see you on the next episode of the Lance Tamashiro show. Bye now.

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