Capturing a New Market – Fred Gleeck

Capturing a New Market – Fred Gleeck

Lance Tamashiro:
We are here again with Fred Gleeck for our weekly update and call. Fred, I mean, a lot of exciting things have happened. I hear people got kicked out of memberships, people got kicked out of sites. We built a really cool new program that I think is going pretty well.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, that's an understatement Lance. Last night we had the first of our five webinar series for the voice over folks. By the way, for those of you who are listening, this is one of my many niches so Lance may be appearing at a theater near you in another niche to help me at some point in the future. Yeah, some people got really annoyed given the fact that you were showing them a completely different way to do things that would work, that many of the ... It's like the establishment players, I mean we're now in the political season. The establishment players don't like Bill, don't like what we're doing.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and what I love about what we did here ... Just so everybody knows, basically we started a course in the voice over niche teaching people how to make money a different way than what the establishment or the main people in the niche think you should do it, or how you should do it, and how you should progress. There's a lot of people upset but there's also a lot of people that are really happy. I think that this is a great lesson in any niche, in anything that you do, is to differentiate yourself. If you find something that works that is different, man ... I think the neat thing about it is you get so much attention and you're so different from how everything else looks that people can't help but to pay attention with you. At the end of the day, I mean, whatever your niche is in, that's great but you're also a marketer and so you apply that marketing, I mean everything changes.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, one of my early niches and which by the way we may want to revisit at some point. I was involved very many years ago in the self storage industry and after the main association there, got really annoyed at my tactics, similar to what we're doing here. I then put on everything of mine banned by the SSA. Banned by the Self Storage Association. It was sort of like a badge of honor kind of thing. Hold on, let me get this real quick. I got a thing going, hold on.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, no problem. I totally agree about it being this badge of honor I guess. I think the point is is that in any marketing that you do, no matter what it is, if you can stir some emotion ... I think what happens way too often, especially online is a niche gets sort of, this is the way that we do it and we did a couple of things that were way different. First of all the method was completely backwards of what the establishment wants and personally, my own personal view is they want it the way that it's always been done because it keeps the successful people successful. It hurts the new people but it also creates a revenue stream for the successful people. Not only did we teach people how to do something different, in a way we're dipping into their pocket books. Now the reason I don't mind that is because at the end of the day if people get results, if people are happy, but the attention you get when you buck the system is you're new. We did a couple of things different. I mean, normal selling in this niche was a blog with a list of PayPal buttons. There was no description of what you were buying it was just you buy because I'm an expert and you're not. The first thing we did was we came out with a direct response sales letter like you see in the internet marketing niche. We didn't know how people were going to respond to that and they responded in two ways, one they really liked it and bought because they had never seen it. Two they were really upset because it brought that infomercial direct response sales to niche that had never seen it. Now in my head I'm thinking what other niches aren't using direct response because [crosstalk 00:04:06] response is crazy.

Fred Gleeck:
I'm in some of those so we'll be seeing those coming to a theater near you.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and the other thing that was interesting for me is that I've been in the niche that I've been in for years now and it was interesting for me to go outside ... I mean I was pretty nervous, I knew that the press against me, what the establishment was telling the people that had bought was this is a scam, this is not going to work, you're not going to like this. Honestly it was the first time in years of teaching course, of doing lectures that I didn't know what was going to happen. I didn't know how it was going to be [crosstalk 00:04:50].

Fred Gleeck:
I was confident in you.

Lance Tamashiro:
It was also a different format for me. I mean most of my teaching goes a lot longer, it's a lot more technical people so I had to sort of change up the way that it went and I think the lesson is that however you teach, whatever you do in your niche you can take that stuff to other audiences and it's fun. It was the first time in a long time that I've been excited and nervous to teach a class. My wife was ... I was upstairs eating before I came down to do that and she's like, "I haven't seen you like this in years." This nervous, and I was telling her there's a large group of people rooting against me tonight. I feel a little more pressure than I normally did but it was fun. It turned out really great.

Fred Gleeck:
I think one of the things that I noticed ... By the way, if everybody's curious about what this is if you go to vosuccess, vosuccessformula.com you'll see what we're talking about. I think we've discussed it before on this podcast but they should know that. One of the things that I found interesting is after the event, all the comments that we were getting related to what I saw which is how I teach, which is making sure that you don't leave out steps. I think people's biggest frustration is that so many times they have been sold this program that gives them A, B, C, D, skip E, F, G, H, skip I, and then you have to pay more to get the letters that were missed as they were giving you the training which is absolute and complete nonsense.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, so we sort of ... Our philosophy in all of our training and I think no matter what niche you're in you should adopt this philosophy is we always start planning any of our training with they're at point A, we need to get them to point B.

Fred Gleeck:
Correct.

Lance Tamashiro:
If you know what point B is, it helps you in a couple of ways, first of all it makes selling the product really easy because you know what you can promise and you know that you can deliver. The second thing that's awesome about this is that you know what they need after they finish. If you take somebody from whatever point A is, where they're at currently and you know for a fact you've got them to point B, you know what the next thing they need is to sell them when they get to that point. I think what happens to so many marketers is they leave stuff out because they're worried about monetizing the next thing, what can I sell them? The truth is you build rabid fans, you build people that are looking to buy stuff and you know exactly what they need if you get them to that point B. The other thing that we do is we always try to do stuff basically in four modules, sometimes we have to do more. For this one we did a Q and A, but what we like to do in the very first module and I joined so many courses where they're like ... The first module I finish it and I'm like, "Everything that you gave me was on the sale. You just read me the sales letter."

Fred Gleeck:
Forget the first module, how many times ... I've actually done this on training courses where I've taken module one, or whatever it is, and I've watched after it takes them twelve minutes to get past the introduction, to view content. I'm like, "Wait a second, I can just delete the first twelve minutes of this. All you're doing is congratulating yourself for who you are and what you do."

Lance Tamashiro:
Or it's pre-sales, or sales stuff. What we always try to do is no matter what it is, we want to give people ... This is the opposite, so most courses by the end of module four or the end of the course, you're lucky if you got what they promised you. Our philosophy is, we flip that. In module one we want you to have everything you need so if you didn't do anything besides module one, you got a big portion of the result that we promised. Last night, for example, we got people up, running, and how to make sales. I mean, in most courses that's the end if you even get to that. We do the same in all of our stuff. If it's setting up membership sites, we don't want you to wait until module six to have your membership site up, we want it in module one. The reason is, is that's how you reduce refunds. That's how you look different, and that's how you build trust with new buyers.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, reduce refunds and increase add-on sales once your done because you gained their trust. They know you deliver, in fact you over deliver and so therefore they're actually asking you, "Hey what do you got next? What more can I buy from you?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and I think that if more marketers would think this way rather than worrying about the next sale, worry about delivering what you promised and the next sale will take care of itself.

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely agree and I've seen that throughout. I'm thinking, it's really interesting because I want to give you an example of who I just met with before I got here. I got a new client who signing a contract tomorrow, you're going to love this niche. Okay, so this guy, I met him at the same coffee shop that I just saw him at now and we started chatting, and we've been talking for a while. Come to find out he's a carpenter but he's not any carpenter, he's a carpenter that specializes in doors. Apparently people who are in the carpentry and construction business, when they get to the doors they just go, "Forget it, we need somebody else." We're establishing two methods for this guy to make money. Number one is to sell their services to other carpenters, dooruniversity.com I reserved. We're going to get other carpenters to come learn his system, to double their hourly rate by learning how to do doors properly. Then also, the ancillary benefit is he didn't even own his own name.com so I registered his own name.com and I said, "Greg, here's what we're going to do," it's Greg [Perolio 00:10:16] if you're in Southern California and need a door, look for that ... I mean this guy knows what he's doing.

The whole idea is there are some really interesting, very, very weird type niches that can produce revenue and my philosophy, as I think is your as well, which is I don't want to have my revenue sources coming from just one place. I want to have ... I actually think I own ahundredchecksamonth.com the whole idea is I want to revenue from multiple, multiple sources coming in. I don't care if this one only brings in fifty or sixty thousand, whatever it is, it's a cool little niche that I knew nothing about.

Lance Tamashiro:
One of the things and I mean you don't have to do it this way but to think really big with the door guy for example, and you can do this in any niche, is he creates a system that is whatever his name is door hanging, making, whatever he does system.

Fred Gleeck:
It had to be [inaudible 00:11:09] let me hear what you have to say.

Lance Tamashiro:
You create a name for it, then what you do is you sell training to people, other carpenters, other whatever to do that. Then what you do is you certify them for taking your course in this system. You create a membership site [crosstalk 00:11:29].

Fred Gleeck:
We're going to give them territories by zip code.

Lance Tamashiro:
You can do that but then what you do is you create a directory of all the members, charge them forty seven, ninety seven dollars a month, whatever it is to be a member on the directory certified in this particular thing. Then what he has to do is no longer be a carpenter, he is now a trainer with this passive income stream and all he has to do is go out and market the system so that clients are looking to the system driving all the traffic back to the main website. They get to the website and they're looking at the directory for somebody in their area that can do the system. He turns into making YouTube videos, getting on local media, just talking to no longer the carpenters but to the consumers about the problems if they're getting a remodeling. That way the consumers go to the people and start saying, "But I want it done this way." We've done this with one of our plastic surgeon people and basically all he does is promote his procedure and he has doctors contacting him saying, "My patients heard about this, wherever they heard about it. How do I get certified to be able to say I do that procedure." His whole marketing is just talking about what he knows.

Fred Gleeck:
The conversation that you just ... The last couple minutes of your talking is exactly what I told him actually the time we met previously and I put it down in a form where this is exactly what we're going to be doing. The thing about it is, since he really likes the business he'll just be able to do less of it and make more money.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, yeah. Exactly. I mean, I think that that's the whole thing. So many people have this mental block about how they move from what they do, which is for a lot of us it's one to one. If you're a doctor you only make money when you're seeing patients. If you're a carpenter you only make money when you're hanging doors or whatever it is. I think the big mindset shift that I think everybody listening needs to make is it doesn't matter how you make money now one to one, there is a way for you to make money one to many and passive. If you can figure that out that's when things change for you.

Fred Gleeck:
The way that I described it one time speaking to a group of asset protection attorneys, is I said, "Look, you guys have acquired all this knowledge, you know a lot about accounting and you know a lot about assets." I said, "The biggest asset that you have right now is sitting between your ears and it is unsold inventory. I'm in the business of taking what's in your head, shaking it all out onto a table, separating it into piles, and then selling it so that you can take that unsold inventory and monetize it so that you can make more money."

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean, one of the best speakers I've ever seen, I'm sure you know him or at least his dad is JJ Childers who is a tax attorney. I've bought his two thousand dollar package that is audio CD's talking about tax strategies for small businesses. The up-sell is the five or ten thousand dollar done for you business set up and tax plan but I mean that's the perfect example. This guy is a tax attorney and goes around the country selling CD's. I mean literally at two thousand dollars a pop. Does he still get tax clients, sure, but he makes a heck of a lot more money selling his tax information.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, and I mean the big objection that I've always heard from everybody is, "Well if I teach everybody how to do this then they'll all do it themselves and I won't get any business." In fact, they'll get halfway through the program and they'll go, "Oh forget it. Let me just call whoever the guru is and let him do it for me."

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and I think the whole thing, even giving away all of the stuff ... I mean, a lot of the stuff that we talk about on this podcast is stuff that we talk about with our private groups as well. The thing is is that if you don't know how to do it and if you don't understand, I mean it's one thing for me to say something like, "We'll just set up a membership site with a directory." If you're listening, I've given you all the steps if you know how to set up the membership site and do the directory. Some people get stuck there, some people don't. There's a group of people listening that are like, "I know exactly how to do that, I know exactly what software. I know exactly how to configure it." Then there's a group that's like, "But now at least I know how to do that." I'm a believer in you can give everything away especially in a limited amount of time, you can never give all the details so don't worry about that. In audio, I can tell you my entire system but until you watch it or see it sometimes things are going to get lost in translation. I never worry about saying too much or giving too much. I think that the opposite's true, the more that you establish yourself as the expert, the more people will want to come to you.

Fred Gleeck:
Now I've got something that happened yesterday that you and I haven't talked about yet, that I want your feedback on because I literally started ... I had to almost laugh out loud at someone over this issue. I'm a member of a Facebook group that is a very exclusive community for a specific group, I won't talk about it because God forbid the person will find out. I saw this person who was interested or having ... She had something on her personal webpage about the fact that she was ... she did coaching or something like that. What I did was I had written an article that's Amazon called Marketing to Find Your Ideal Client, is what I called it right? What I did was I took that Amazon link and I put it in the Facebook group and I said, "Hey here's an article that if you are interested in it, I'll be happy to send it to you for free. Please don't buy it on Amazon." I then get a call within 20 minutes from this person ... You have no idea where I'm going, watch this.

She calls me up and says, "Ah, by the way, that thing that you posted on there, it's really making me look like I'm an amateur." I go, "I'm not sure I understand you." She says, "Well, you posted something about finding your ideal client and I'm in that business, and people may look at me and think that I'm just a newbie and getting started." I said, "Time out, I was trying to help you if you needed an additional resource." The idea is this particular individual clearly knows everything there is to know about her topic and needs no ... She doesn't need to read anymore, she doesn't need to talk to anybody else. She apparently knows so much that my even putting something up insinuating that she may need, or may want to gain some additional knowledge is going to quote hurt her brand.

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean, I think the biggest thing that I struggle with and that the private conversations I have with my business partner almost always center around this and it's that we're too much of experts that we have lost touch with our customer base. Meaning that we assume that we know what they ... that they know what we know. We also assume that they want to know it at the level that we know it. The truth of the matter is, one percent of our customers even want to know it the way that we know it.

Fred Gleeck:
They just want to get it done.

Lance Tamashiro:
You're always better off thinking like a newbie in whatever it is that you're teaching or selling because that's where your mass market is. I mean, I've got people that buy our courses that I know for a fact make a million dollars a year doing internet marketing, have been around internet marketing since the beginning but they still like to take the courses because they ... I'm always baffled I'm like, "Why is so and so buying this course, it's about setting up a squeeze page and setting up your auto responder?" Their philosophy is if I can pick up one thing that I didn't know or see one way that you do it that is different than it's worth it for me because I will make the money back. I do the same thing, I buy stuff that people are like, "Why would you buy that?" Because for me, if I spend three hundred dollars on a course I'm literally usually looking for one tip that I know will make me that three hundred dollars and then some.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, that's a great concept and I agree. The other flip side to this is people always say to me, "Well, when you do your training," and just like we did last night, "you give people everything from the very, very beginning." Someone will say, "Well what about your people who are a little bit more advanced or in the middle?" I say, "Well here's what happens, when we give them the basics they then pat themselves on the back going I knew that, I knew that until they get to the part where it's like oh I didn't know that." That's one of those great ideas. They like being told what they already know because they know they're doing it right.

Lance Tamashiro:
I think with a training course specifically, you have to get everybody at the beginning on the same page. For example last night, last night was tedious. It was tedious for me, it was a lot of technical stuff, but now we get to focus on the fun stuff. We get to focus on the theory and the strategy, where we couldn't do that ... If we just went in and said, "Blah, blah, blah." You're going to lose half the audience and you're right. I got emails from one of the guys that was already doing very well on [inaudible 00:21:02] and sent me messages that said, "I never thought of this. This was genius, I'm glad that you showed me this." He was one of the people quite frankly that I was worried about.

Fred Gleeck:
It was the mobile thing right?

Lance Tamashiro:
No, no.

Fred Gleeck:
Something else.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, something else.

Fred Gleeck:
For those of you listening, this is a little bit of inside baseball. The other thing Lance, this is the reason why in college, remember if you ... For those of you who went to college which now turns out to be a waste of time, but the whole idea is that they have prerequisites and unless you have 101 economics you can't take 301 economics because they demand that you do the other stuff first. It makes sense.

Lance Tamashiro:
Right. Yeah, I mean it totally makes sense and I think that you'll be fine. I think that's the way you have to look at any training course is you got to get everybody on the same page. The people that aren't there are going to love it because nobody's ever got them caught up in anything. The people that already know it are going to love it because it reinforces but also it's going to ... They're going to pick something up because you're inevitably going to do something different.

Fred Gleeck:
You know, I want to bring something up that's really important that we can share with everybody that is, I think, a concept that everybody should understand as well. You and I, it was Bill and I are involved in a business, you and Robert are in the business and we came to you and last night we generated well over forty thousand dollars on this training of which our GO is a fifty fifty split. Somebody might say to me, "My god, you're giving them fifty percent." I'm going, "Absolutely." Let me explain to people why I love this arrangement. First off from years and years ago, as I think I told you, I was one of the first people who had a private license with one shopping cart mine is webmarketingmagic.com, feel free to go there and sign up because if not, web.com makes all the money. Sign up with me because we don't want to give the quote mother company the ... If you do that ...

Here's the deal, I've told you that over the years I've made a lot of money with that piece of software and it was always based on splitting the revenue fifty fifty with them because they handled all the technical side and all the customer service side. I'm telling people that are listening to this podcast you should generously and repeatedly give away fifty percent to not have to handle the technical side and not have to handle the customer service side. My question to you is, you're getting paid the fifty percent to handle those two things, do you still think this is a good deal for you and why?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, I mean we look at everything. I mean most of our products we give a hundred percent commissions because we don't have to do the marketing and we know that we'll convert the buyer later. We give fifty percent on most everything else. Our whole philosophy with the affiliate stuff or splitting revenue is they're sales that we would have not made otherwise. I mean for me to go out and do advertising and figure out ad words, and generate new traffic ... The reason it's a win win is one side has traffic, one side has expertise, big deal if you got traffic and buyers if you have nothing to sell them. On the other hand, if you got something to teach but no traffic, you're both stuck. To us, it's always like any extra sale is a good sale. The one thing that's a little bit awkward for us in this particular one is we're not in this niche. This isn't our niche, it doesn't necessarily help us to be in this other than we have a system that for us to teach it again, it's really just show up and teach it.

Fred Gleeck:
The other thing is this Lance that's interesting is that I have always had a philosophy ever since I started doing internet/information marketing which I started in the mid 90's and transitioned from doing it offline, is that I look for and delight in finding obscure niches that are big enough to be profitable but not like ... When somebody tells me they're in the weight loss niche or the dating niche I'm like, "My god, that's so crowded and so competitive. I want to be doing stuff with doors, I want to be doing stuff with voice over." Now voice overs is starting to get crowded because ... By the way, here's another example of something, people need to listen to this.

We own veosuccessformula.com, so somebody went there, I don't know how long ago, registered veosuccess.com. Went I sent that to Bill to take a look at he goes, "Never heard of this guy." Some guy is trying to poach some of our customers with a very limited amount of knowledge or experience. Be careful when you start to register or create training, registering domain names, try and get some misspellings, do all that stuff. Have you that experience yourself where people are trying to knock you off?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, we have a lot of people with that and there is a legal basis to go after them and get the thing. It's based around confusion in the marketplace. There's a product called Wishlist Member, you're not a lot to create a domain that's called Wishlist Members. They can, if they go to the domain registrar, the domain registrar will give you the domain because it's intentionally done to create confusion in the marketplace.

Fred Gleeck:
I've got a really big question for you then. Ten, twelve years ago, this guy who had attended one of my seminars in the early 90's, comes to one of my seminars and then emails me a few weeks later and says, "Oh by the way, if you let me come to all your events for free for the rest of my life I will give you back gleeck.com," which he registered. Do I have a case against him?

Lance Tamashiro:
Not unless he is siphoning your stuff. He can have gleek.com and use it for something totally non-related. As soon as he starts selling something related, then you have a case. I can have a domain, if I had ... As long as you're not ... That's the squatting law, right, because it's basically extortion in the stuff.

Fred Gleeck:
That's what I thought.

Lance Tamashiro:
As long as you're not squatting for the purpose of I'm going to set this up so that he has to come buy if from me so I put a bunch of bad stuff about Fred Gleeck on it. But if he's using it for something totally unrelated you have no case.

Fred Gleeck:
Good, well that's important that people know because I was concerned and in fact ... Yeah, so in other words the only time you really have a case is if somebody is trying to use your name to confuse people in the marketplace to buy something similar or related?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, yeah. I mean, we have a course called WebinarCrusher.com and we've had people set up Webinarcrusher.biz, webinarcrusher.net and they go try to sell it on other marketplaces knowing that the market knows our product trying to sell it under the same thing.

Fred Gleeck:
The best [inaudible 00:28:04] I ever heard, and you'll like this because this name may have been before your time. Do you know who Johnathon Mizel is?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes, sure.

Fred Gleeck:
Okay. Johnathon Mizel, I knew from literally the mid 90's right? A buddy of mine who actually sold Tony Robins the domain personalpower.com, I won't tell you for how much because I don't think he got paid enough. When Johnathon Mizel was told that this guy owned Johnathonmizel.com or think that was it, he said, "Well, you know, now that I know you I feel kind of bad." He goes, Johnathon goes, "Oh don't worry about it. Just set yourself as an affiliate and sell my stuff."

Lance Tamashiro:
Then that's fine too.

Fred Gleeck:
I thought that was great. What an answer as opposed to, "That's mine give it back to me." He was like, "Oh no problem, just use an affiliate and start making money."

Lance Tamashiro:
At the end of the day, what I do is when there's a domain I want and I don't want to go through the fight for it, you can go to whois.com see when it's going to lapse, just stick it on your calander. I just stick it on my Google calendar and check. Nine times out of ten they it lapse and you just pick it up and act like it never happened.

Fred Gleeck:
Perfect, well that's a lot of information we've covered today for people. Again we'll see you I guess next week same time same channel right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Same time, same channel. Thank you everybody for listening. Make sure you guys go and rate and review us on Itunes, we are currently number twenty in the business and marketing category and it would be awesome if you guys pushed us to number one. Thanks a lot and have a great day.

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