Don’t Be THAT Guy – Network Marketing – Michelle & Adam Carey

Don’t Be THAT Guy – Network Marketing – Michelle & Adam Carey

You guys are going to love this. We're going to talk about it today. It's called "Don't Be 'That Guy' In Network Marketing". I love the way that this book is written. We're going to dive into it and talk a lot about that, but Adam and Michelle, thank you so much for being on the show. I really appreciate you guys taking the time out of your schedules to do this.

Michelle Carey:
Hey, Lance. Thank you so much for having us. We're super excited.

Adam Carey:
Yeah, honored to be here. Thanks for all you're doing for the marketplace. I'd love to add some value to your listeners.

Lance Tamashiro:
Before we get in and talk ... I can't wait to talk about this book. There's so many funny and just cool things in there, but along with it, a lot of great lessons as well. Can you guys talk about ... I think when people are being successful in network marketing, people are actually out there doing this stuff, what that journey was like for you guys, how you guys met each other, and also, how do you guys manage being married and doing business together at the same time?

Adam Carey:
Yeah, that's a loaded question. We've been a part of the network marketing profession for the last 8 years. If you read our book, what it'll do is it's going to give you hope that you could have success because we made every mistake. It really should give you some clarity that it's okay to fail and you can still make it. You're not going to have a perfect journey. We actually were dating when we first started our business. We were a blind date. I was selling boats before the economy decided to collapse in 2007 and 2008. When the economy is good, boat sales are good, but when companies are setting down, people are losing homes, not everybody is rushing to the dealership to finance a boat. I was out of a job literally overnight.

Michelle was working retail at the mall, and a buddy that worked with. I went to high school with her. She was actually [a cold call 00:02:43]. Lance, I [cold-called 00:02:44] her and I invited her over for dinner for lasagna and she turned me down because that freaked her out, but I ended up being a pretty good recruiter. That's a whole nother story. We came together. We both had a entrepreneurial drive. We knew that we were both working 7 days a week, hardly got a chance to spend time together, and we knew there had to be a better way.

Unfortunately for us, we just didn't have much credibility, we didn't have much capital, and we even borrowed the initial investment that it took to get started in the direct sales network marketing. What's nice is it's typically a low startup cost to get into business, but you get so many benefits. A proven system tools. You get support and there's a lot of benefits. There are sometimes negative perceptions that come with the industry that we really have a heart for to overcome with our book and elevating that, but we came together, started part-time, and was it about a year or 2 into our business?

Michelle Carey:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Adam Carey:
We actually got married. We were building separate businesses. Michelle says, "I thought she joined my business because I was a good recruiter, but she said she joined my business because she wanted me to like her."

Lance Tamashiro:
I didn't see that one in the book.

Adam Carey:
Yeah, you didn't see that one in the book?

Michelle Carey:
That's inside information.

Adam Carey:
The [inaudible 00:04:02] must have cut that one out. We started building it together and, man, it was a tough journey. It never went as fast as we thought it would go. It still doesn't. There's so many lessons we've learned along the way, but I wouldn't change one thing about the journey because we can truly relate to people that our battling ... Business, whether it's direct sales or whether it's traditional business, whatever they're going through, it's a learning curve. I don't know. We've had more education just being in business than I ever did at any university, any school, any classroom. You learn by doing. It's just been a fun experience.

Lance Tamashiro:
One of the things that just jumped out at me as soon as you started your story was you said you guys got, or you did, you got laid off right when the recession started. You had no credibility, no capital, and this is when you started your business?

Adam Carey:
Yeah, absolutely. I'm grateful that we didn't ... Here's why, Lance. I see a lot of people join our profession that ... You meet the 2 types of people. There's the people with a lot of money and no time. There's the people with a lot of time and no money. We were in both of those categories. We had no time and no money. I see a lot of people that are somewhat comfortable when they come into this profession, and they're not willing to get uncomfortable to be successful here, and then they fall back on their high-salary job which they still have no time with their family, but we really had nothing else going for us. It was like, "What else are we going to do?" Yeah, we didn't have a whole lot of options.

Lance Tamashiro:
You get started, and then I guess you got started with a certain network marketing company, or you guys have multiple network marketing companies? What does your business look like?

Michelle Carey:
We've been with the same one for ... Was it 8 years now we just celebrated?

Adam Carey:
Yup.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome.

Michelle Carey:
Yeah, our journey has been with that. Then one day, we just wanted to start doing some online marketing. This book that we sent you was only supposed to be a 20-page little e-book, and then we started remembering about this mistake and then this mistake that we did and, "Oh, how about when this happened?" Then we had suddenly 160 pages on our hands and we were like, "We have a full-blown book." Our training platform pretty much was burst out of this idea.

Now what we do alongside our network marketing business is we publish trainings online. It's free. Then we have a few products to help people. Talking to people that they meet in the cold market and not be that guy when you're out there, or talking with your friends and family and not scaring them off in those initial conversations. It's evolving to something bigger than we really thought in the beginning, but we're super pumped about it because we just keep getting confirmation after confirmation.

At first, we didn't know if it was going to be received well. Sometimes we thought, "Oh man, how about if people think we're unleashing all these secrets that happen in the network marketing profession," but either way, there's people that are encountering these "that guy" characters out there, and we already have that perception, unfortunately, out there happening. We just have a lot of confirmations that people are like, "Well, this industry needs this information." It's really our heart to just elevate the profession.

Adam Carey:
Yeah, literally 5 minutes before we jumped on the line with you, Lance, we just got a message from a top leader, very well-respected in the industry. In fact, he's been in the industry for about 30 years and he owns a network marketing company. We had sent him a book, connected with him. He finally read it and he was raving. He's like, "This is solid gold. Our industry needs this book." It was so encouraging to hear that from an owner of a company, going, "Yeah, our industry needs this information." We're pretty excited about it. We're having a lot of fun, too.

Lance Tamashiro:
One thing that really just made me perk up is you guys have been with the same company for 8 years. I'm from Utah County, Utah which is just south of Salt Lake City. Around here, the joke is we're the network marketing capital of the world.

Adam Carey:
You're in the heart of it, man.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, we've got everything and everywhere. One of the things, when you said you've been with the same company for 8 years, I've lived here for about 10, 11 years now, and I look around and I watch some make it, some fail. How do you go about, if somebody was even considering doing something like this, what are some of the things that they need to look at as far as, "Is there opportunity for them? Is the company going to be around in 8 years," in order to not get discouraged and just waste a lot of time and effort?

Adam Carey:
Unfortunately, nobody has the crystal ball. Nobody knows what the future holds, but I think there are several things to consider. I think by far, the most important thing is the company leadership. Who's running the show? You can have the best service, the best product, but if you don't have the right people running the company, they're the ones that are making decisions that could affect your family, that could affect your income. We're extremely blessed that we chose a solid company. They're moving up the ranks. They're very highly ranked in the world already. They're not a very old company.

Sometimes you pick the wrong company, and fortunately, we haven't run into that. We were meeting with a couple the other day that she's actually now an owner of a company. She built 3 of them, and the owners changed compensation, changed things. She built 3 massive businesses, lost all 3. Luckily, we haven't had to deal with that. I would say look at the credibility of the company. Look at the integrity. What matters most to them? Is it the money or is it integrity? Look at the product or the service. Is it something that people actually need? Are you excited enough about it?

Lance Tamashiro:
Right.

Adam Carey:
Because a lot of times, it's taking money out of somebody's budget, and if it's going to take money out of somebody's budget, it better add some value. You got to be passionate about it. The company needs to be solid. A lot of compensation plans, however you dice it, there's ways to make money. You think of anything else?

Michelle Carey:
I think it's important also, you just look at credible sources. You could go on to Google and people just write whatever they want about whatever company that's out there, and it could truly be a solid company. You could just run into somebody that didn't work and they were expecting the money to fall from the sky. That didn't happen, so they go on there and they say it doesn't work. You want to make sure that you're not looking at uncredible sources. There's actually a source that's great. It's the Direct Sales Association. Any company that's in that has been through a vetting process, so you know it's not anything that's inappropriate.

Unfortunately, there are pyramid scams out here. I used to watch a lot of American Greed and it's like, "Man, no wonder people are skeptical," but also, one thing to also just keep in mind, if you are with a company, there's no perfect company that's out there. I think it's really easy to be with a company for a long time. You know, Lance, there's companies that pop up, they're new, they're a shiny toy that's on the block, and a lot of people think, "Well, it's probably going to be a lot easier over there."

Lance Tamashiro:
Right.

Michelle Carey:
What happens is they start jumping companies, and 2 things happen there. They lose credibility with their contacts because their contacts are just like, "Uh-oh, here we go again." It's just important to pick one that you're passionate about and you're passionate about the product, and stick with it no matter if you're in the low values or you have a high peak. The season is always going to evolve and it's always going to be different.

Lance Tamashiro:
That's going to be true in whatever your business is. I love that whole thing. People always, "Things get a little tough and they jump ship," and it's like, "Oh, if you would have just hung on! You were right there, and then they're gone." It's like, I don't know if you guys [see 00:12:34] the stock market, but it goes down, everybody sells. The day they sell, the market goes back up. They buy. The day they buy, they go down. It's like, "Just stay put. Stick to it." Along those lines with all of this is you guys have this book ... I love it. I was super impressed. I didn't know ... When you guys said, "We're sending you this book," I was like, "Oh, great," but everything about this book is awesome.

Do you guys want to talk about ... You've mentioned it a little bit. Again, it's called "Don't Be 'That Guy' In Network Marketing". The thing that I love about this is, yes, it's specific to network marketing, but this is a handbook for relationship building. This is a handbook for any kind of sales. This is a handbook for networking more than network marketing, at least through the lens that I read it. Can you guys talk about how this book came about, why you guys put it together the way that you did? Because this thing, for me, I picked it up and started flipping through it and I'm like, "Okay, I'll read a little bit," and next thing you know, I'm through the whole thing.

Adam Carey:
Yeah, yeah. It was a lot of fun to put together. As Michelle mentioned, we never intended to write a book. We wanted to build an online brand, and one of the ways you do that is you add value to the marketplace and give, give, give, and so we wanted to have some type of an e-book. We'd go on walks with our daughter around the block and we just started ... It was like rapid-fire, just ideas and stories. Some of them were horror stories. The things that we wish we could have ... but we're glad that we did them because now, we got to share those mistakes.

In the book, we covered 21 of the common mistakes that we see, but it is very universal for a lot of people in sales and in business. I was telling you before the show that I've got an uncle that leads a sales team. It's just business to business. He got some books for his guys because ... Every chapter has a title. The Lackless. The Motormouth. The Social Media Spammer, which is a huge epidemic. People just blast in commercials. "Ask me how! Here's my link! Save money! Make money!" People just tune you out. There's a way to do it, there's a way not to do it.

Probably one of my personal favorites, Lance, is I'm a low-pressure guy. I treat people the way I'd want to be treated, or, in fact, I try to treat them better. I don't like the high pressure, the old school ways of selling, and I think people, they don't like that either. The Con-vincers, one of our chapters, "Con-vincing," if you have to con-vince someone to get in or to buy your service or to buy your product, they might have that buyer's remorse. They might not truly be in, and we only want to work with the volunteers. When people tell us, "Hey, I'll give it a try," we just tell them, "Please don't. Please don't give this a try. If you want to commit and you want to build a business, let's do it. We can work it as little or as much as you want. That's up to you," but nobody was ever successful by being lukewarm.

The how is we want to elevate the profession. We really think this book does 3 things. It's going to accelerate success because they're going to be able to avoid the mistakes that we made. All the stories are mostly our stories, our mistakes, over the past 8 years. It's going to alleviate rejection. You can't eliminate all of rejection, but you can certainly alleviate a lot of the unnecessary rejection by not being a professional. Then by everybody taking advantage of it, it's going to give our industry a better image. It's going to elevate it. Anything to add, Michelle?

Michelle Carey:
Yeah, I want to jump in because I think this chapter would be a lot relatable to your audience. It's called The Networking Group Tasmanian Devil, because we were "that guy" at networking groups where we go through chamber functions or mixers and we didn't know what we were doing. We're in our early 20s. We would just be equipped with a stack of cards and we'd show up at these events and we just ...

Adam Carey:
"Churn and burn, baby."

Michelle Carey:
Yeah, churn and burn. We were just handing our cards left and right. We weren't asking people about what they do. It was just a big mess. We were really in it very selfishly. We didn't care about other people's businesses and giving value to them. We were sweeping through these groups and just trying to recruit people. Then we turned around and we would say, "You know, those don't work."

Then we started to realize exactly what we were doing wrong and we flipped it. We just went and we slowed down and we built solid relationships. We took our recruiting hats off and we just wanted to build those true, authentic relationships. Out of that came referrals of people that it was a better fit for. There was no pressure. It was so much more enjoyable. Then from that, you also build friendships that last. That was a huge one for us being new to business, is just not going in there expecting that you're just going to hit a bunch of sales right away. It's just taking the time.

Adam Carey:
Well, we had a mentor tell us, "Instead of just trying to sell everybody, why don't you find out what people need and then show them a solution?" What that entails is asking good questions, finding out the pain points, finding out what people are looking for, and then saying, "Hey, I think I have a solution for you. Would you be open to listening?" Man, people are so much more open if they know they're being listened to. That was a huge turning point for us, is find out what people want and then show them how to get it, whether it's your product, your service, your company. That's universal across the board whatever type of business you're in.

Lance Tamashiro:
The thing that I love about this book is, me personally, I'm very uncomfortable in networking situations. Meaning, if I'm at a chamber meeting, if I'm at a seminar, if I'm at whatever. I'm that guy that is like I can't talk to anybody. I don't know why. It's just, I'm very nervous, and then I'm fine once I get to know you, but what I love about this book is I've got not only the description of what I may or may not be doing wrong, but then I've got these action tips and exercises. For me, it's like starting the conversation, a lot of times it's hard. I don't know what questions to ask. I don't know what I'm doing wrong, and if I can just get that rolling ...

What I love with this is it's real specific exercises and action tips that open up that ... It allows me to get over that initial thing which is like, "What questions should I ask? Oh, I'm not supposed to be the Tasmanian Devil and just hand stuff out. Oh, I'm supposed to have these things ready." It gives me a toolbox to take around to go, "Okay, this is how I'm going to open a conversation. This is what I'm going to say here." For a person like me, that's what I think is so great about this book.

Michelle Carey:
Right. I can actually relate to you, Lance, because I'm actually like you. I'm very uncomfortable being in social situations where it's brand new, but once you get to know me or once I get to know you, I just come out of my shell. Adam is more ... He's just everybody's friend in the first 2 minutes. I really struggle with that. When we were compiling the action steps, I was just thinking, "Okay, what helped me? What helped me navigate myself in having those conversations out there and what made it easier?" I definitely could relate to you in that.

Lance Tamashiro:
Okay, so along these lines, with the book and everything in hand, what is your favorite or biggest mistake that you guys have here in this book that you see people making or that you made yourself that's really, you just watch it? With what you guys have here, I know you guys go to events and you just stand back. I can just see you 2 standing in the corner. You guys probably have a little signal or a look that's each of these to each other where you're like, "Oh, there's the guy. There's Negative Nancy and Poor-me Paul," and you guys have your own inside jokes. Which is the one that you guys see most often, or the one that you're just like, "Oh, do this!" the most, or have the most fun with?

Michelle Carey:
The one I see the most happening across the board would be the Social Media Spammer. Actually, it was funny. The other day, I had a private message come through my Facebook account. It was this gal, and she had this really long message explaining the business. There was a sense of desperation behind her message, and I just was like, "Oh my gosh." Then I saw the news feed and it was on there as well. A bunch of commercials, trying to sell people on her product.

I just messaged her and I said, "Hey, are you open to coaching? Because I hate to see you do this," because I was there. I was that person that got the unfriend button clicked on my [inaudible 00:21:49]. I just didn't know. I was new to Facebook as well, so when I opened up my account, I was like, "This is awesome! Look at my audience." I just posted something and I waited for the fish to jump in the boat. That wasn't the case.

What happened was I had people unfriending me. No one ever messaged me or commented on those posts. I really felt for her, and I ended up sending her some of our videos so she could see a visual example as well, but that would probably be the most common that I see just because it's so public. I know a lot of your audience, they're probably like, "Yeah, I have a lot of people on my feed that do that exact same thing," and it breaks my heart almost because it's painting the wrong picture about network marketers.

Adam Carey:
Here, for your listeners that are not involved in the industry, let me ask you if this sounds familiar. You get a call from your friend. "Hey, what are you doing Saturday? We're barbecuing burgers. Come on over. We're going to hang. We're going to throw the football. I'd love to see you. We're going to watch the game." Then they get there and they see 12 other cars in the driveway, parked. They're going, "I thought this was a [inaudible 00:23:00]? What's going on here?" and they walk into a business presentation.

The people that are not in the industry, that's the most common. We have a lot of friends just through church and different things in community that are not involved in the industry, and they know that we're etiquette trainers. They see our book, they see what we're doing, and they go, "Oh, I got a story for you." It breaks my heart because that turned them off. There's even a friend of ours, her parents got invited to a "barbecue". They walked into a business presentation with 20 other people, and they were livid.

That transfer, that negativity transferred over to the daughter because they're influencing the daughter. Now the daughter's grown up and has kids of her own, and she wants nothing to do with our industry, yet she doesn't know much about our industry, and she was telling me this. She said, "Adam, I don't even care if the products would save my life. I would never do what was done to my family." They just don't know that we don't do that. I would say that's probably one of the biggest reasons people don't join our industry, is they were bait and slammed. There's a chapter on that and there's a pretty big story of what we did wrong. "Pay-per-view fight, pizza, come on over," and they got a presentation.

Michelle Carey:
Yeah, we lost lots of friends that night.

Lance Tamashiro:
What's interesting about that is that because so many people have had that happen to them and then they see your book, that's got to open up a lot of doors. Using that negative stuff that people have and then them seeing what you're doing and the way that you approach it, I'd almost think that that opens up a lot of doors for you and "con-verts" people back to you because of this whole other thing where they have this thing and they're like, "Hey, you're not doing all this stuff that I have this perception of salespeople or network marketers." Then now they're interested simply because you're not "that guy". In a weird way, it's like by doing nothing or the opposite, you're getting all of these people that are aware of it, and they're interested because you're doing it different.

Michelle Carey:
Hey, Lance, it's cutting out a little bit at the end.

Adam Carey:
Are you there?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yup. Still here. Yeah, I was just saying, in a weird way, that's got to attract people to you just because you're not doing what they're expecting you to do.

Adam Carey:
Michelle just recently got pulled aside. With the power of the internet, social media, you don't know who sees your stuff. We got some skits and videos. We got a lot of humor to what we do. This girl pulled Michelle aside the other day and said, "Hey, I watched your stuff. I was never interested in the industry, but I see how you're doing it." That actually encouraged her and inspired her to go find a company to join. She didn't join our company, but we were flattered and excited that our material, our training, actually gave her the confidence to participate in the profession.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome.

Adam Carey:
That was a huge win for us.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, that's awesome. I love that that's still ... you consider that a win. They didn't get in under you, they didn't join your company, but the fact that you changed somebody's perception and they got what they needed, which, maybe your opportunity wasn't right for them, but you're still happy about it. I think a lot of businesses, if they'd start looking at things like what's best for the consumer, man, that's going to come back to you at some point whether you think it is or not.

Adam Carey:
Absolutely. It's really about having that abundance mindset. If you're worried about it, you're just focused on the lack. Whatever is going to be a better fit for them, and the way we look at it is the better our industry does to the outside world, we're all doing the same thing. They don't care about this company and that company. They just see if there's something negative, it labels our whole industry. Yeah, we've seen what it's done for us as parents. We get to be home with our 2-year-old daughter. We just want people to be able to have all the benefits, so, yup, absolutely. That's definitely a win.

Michelle Carey:
I watched ... Go ahead, Lance.

Lance Tamashiro:
No, please.

Michelle Carey:
I want to add to that. In the past, maybe people have labeled or had an experience in network marketing that was pretty cutthroat, that there's no unity between companies. We really see a shift happening within the profession where more leaders are starting to unite and collaborate. We used to be the person that would be like, "Oh, well, our company is the best. If you do any other company, then you're just joining a weaker [link 00:27:34]," but we really humbled ourselves.

Now, we just care about people being in something that they're passionate about. Life is just way too short to be doing something, and going through the motions, and not having that passion and true impact. That's all we want, whether it's products or services. If our service isn't a right fit, go find that fit because you don't want to be at the end of your life and just have regrets, saying you never went for what you really wanted to go for.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love it. Yeah, this book, I'm not in network marketing, I learned a ton from it. I do. I think this is valuable for any business owner to pick up and take a look at, regardless of what your industry is in. Whether you're in sales, whether you're a business owner, whether you sell products, whether you sell services, whether you're in network marketing, this is something that has stuff for everybody and lessons, regardless of where you're at. Where can anybody listening go to either pick up the book to check it out, or even just find out more information about the 2 of you and what you guys are up to?

Michelle Carey:
For sure. The book is on Amazon. You'll be able to pick it up there. Then you could also pick up [bulk 00:28:55] copies off of our personal website which is AdamandMichelleCarey.com. That's Michelle with 2 L's, and our last name is C-A-R-E-Y just like Jim Carrey, Drew Carey, and Mariah Carey, but we have absolutely no relation.

Lance Tamashiro:
... But Adam and Michelle, yeah.

Michelle Carey:
Yeah. We also have prepared a gift for your listeners.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome.

Michelle Carey:
If something about we said resonated with you, you could go to ThatGuyBook.com and pick up a free extra gift we think is truly special.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome. Well, I really appreciate you guys doing that. Again, you guys can check them out at AdamandMichelleCarey.com. There'll be the link in the show note. The book is called "Don't Be 'That Guy' in Networking Marketing". You can go to ThatGuyBook, correct?

Michelle Carey:
Correct.

Lance Tamashiro:
ThatGuyBook.com. Pick up your free gift. If nothing else, hit them up, check out their stuff, say hello to them. You guys are going to absolutely love this. There's no doubt about it. This is a fantastic read for anybody. Please check that out.

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