Tag - Fred Gleeck

Pricing, Happy Customers and Traffic with No List! Fred Gleek

Hey, Fred, what is going on? Welcome back to this week. This has been ... I think this is week 6 or 7 now of this podcast. What's crazy is when I started doing my podcast, I actually started my podcast a couple of years ago, to teach a course for people on how to do it. Podcasting didn't really have any traction in those days, so I let it die. If you go look, there's a podcast from 2013. Maybe I would 2 or 3 a year. I think in the last, I don't know, 2 months, 3 months, there's been literally 3 or 4 every single week. What's amazing is the traction that podcasting has these days, and I think that the lesson for me in all of it, was you never know who's listening or what's going to happen.

I look back on it and go, "I really wish that I would have just done something every single week, or once a month, or whatever that schedule was since 2013." We're doing well in the rankings on the podcast now, but man, it would've been a whole lot easier if I would've just built on it and said, "It's just one of those things I'm going to do, wait until the snowball effect happens."

Fred Gleeck:
It's funny. I was all cued up to tell you a story, but because of what you said, I'll start with another one, which really relates to this. Years and years ago, I used to teach continuing education classes. I was in New York City, and there's this place called the Learning Annex. I used to teach classes through them. Before there was the Learning Annex, there was a place before that called the Discovery Center, which was a crappy version of what then was a ...

One day, I'm sitting there, and I'm teaching this class on how to do your own seminars and workshops. My best-selling book on Amazon is Marketing and Promoting Your Own Seminars and Workshops. I did this seminar. I showed up at this classroom, because they'd have it in a public school or whatever, they booked space. There were 5 people there. Normally, what happens when you have 5 people and you want 30 people in the room at least, you're all bummed out, disappointed, and you generally give a pretty crappy performance, because you're bummed out that only 5 people showed up. I always tell people previous to that, I would say, "Look, the people who showed up, they deserve the same quality of presentation as the people who weren't there that you wanted there."

Here's what happened, talking about the whole podcasting thing. I gave this presentation to 5 people, unbeknownst to me, one of the people was the CEO of Working Woman Magazine. She then hook me up to all kinds of stuff that was worth thousands of dollars. The lesson there is, no matter what you're doing to how many people, you better give it your best, because you'll never know who's watching.

Lance Tamashiro:
Really, in a room of ... If you wanted 30 people, you're at a pretty good closing rate or selling rate if you close 5 people. If you just ... The way I tend to look at it, and I know that feeling. It sucks when you're expecting 100, and 20 show up, or you're expecting whatever. One of the things that I have to do for myself mentally is go, "Those were my 5 buying units anyway. Now I just get to close at a 100%, rather than a 30%, or whatever."

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. It's funny, because back then, this is in the mid-80s ...

Lance Tamashiro:
They heyday of the seminar or selling.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. I was the only person within that structure, I believe, that was selling anything at the presentation. I would deliver this ... I'd give them a lot of content, and I close them. People would be like, "How come you're doing those stupid classes at the Discovery Center." I go, "Dude, it's not about the money they're giving me. I don't really care. In fact, I would never monitor the checks. They would send them to me occasionally. They'd give me some pittance for that, but I would close a whole bunch of people." You're right, the smaller the amount of people in the room, the greater the higher my closing ratio.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. They're the better people to begin with.

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely. Here's the follow on to that, real quick. It relates to seminars as well. I had this situation. As of tomorrow, here in Los Angeles, I was going to be going to a 2-day event for $97. I saw this guy put up something. I won't give specifics because of the story. 97 bucks for 2 days, I'm going ... First off, I'm a little suspicious, because it's like, "That's too cheap." He immediately ... I signed up I think on Monday. Yesterday, I get an email from him, obviously he throw me onto a list that said, "Oh, by the way, my seminar in Los Angeles, I have 3 free tickets for whoever wants them."

I immediately the guy and go, "Hey, dude, you wanted to charge me $97 bucks to show up. Now you're sending the emails telling me you're going to give 3 tickets away for free. I'm pretty annoyed." In my ... This is a nice little plug here. I wrote a blog post. I was blogging 3 times a week for 5 years in a row, and then I just got bored, and so my last blog post was some time in 2015. I put a blog post up yesterday on FredGleeck.com, everyone can see it, that talks about this incident. Basically, what I talked about is how do you handle it? All of us have been in situations where we had seminars where not enough people showed up. I gave specific suggestions on this blog post as to how people should do this properly to not piss anybody off.

Lance Tamashiro:
I think this is huge. We're not talking about the same guy, but there's another seminar being promoted right now that started off $697 for a ticket. As of today, it's $97 for 2 people, and I was thinking, "Man, maybe we're talking about the same seminar, because this one is also in the Los Angeles area." I look at it, and I haven't seen your blog post and all of that. My philosophy with whether it's selling a product, or selling a seminar, or selling a service is always start low, and then raise the price, because you're never going to piss somebody off because they paid less than somebody else. You're always going to piss somebody off if they pay more.

In fact, I was talking to my business partner about this other seminar yesterday. I said, "If I had bought ... Well, first thing is if I hadn't bought or said I was going to the seminar yet, I wouldn't go, because what my assumption is that you didn't sell any tickets, and I don't want to be the only person going." That's the first thing. The second thing is if you did sell any tickets at $400, $500, $600, $97, and now they're $40, I'm pissed off as a buyer. I'm not going because you've lowered ... Even if you refund me the money, I'm not going because I paid-"

Fred Gleeck:
Wait a second. Have you read my blog post?

Lance Tamashiro:
No, I haven't. I totally haven't.

Fred Gleeck:
Okay. Even to what you're saying, we're again of like mind, because those are a couple of points that I made too.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think you can't go wrong. When we've done seminars because it's always ... The bottom line is it's scary. It's a scary thing to put money down for a room. There's a perception of how do you manage. Everybody wants to say, "Look, I got a thousand people." The truth is it's hard when 50 show up, then what do you do? What we always try to do was we would bundle free. We would say, "If you buy our $500 course, you get a free ticket to this even, which is happening here." That way we can control that. We know we're going to make sales. It makes a good bonus for a high ticket product. We know those people are coming.

Then it doesn't matter what we charge because they just got it as a bonus for another program, plus we know we have people coming. Then it's like ... I don't know. I always feel like ... For me, this is just in our business, we always sell better when we're raising the price. It creates urgency. It creates scarcity. It also creates a perception that it's selling. If you're raising your price, it's selling. When I see people lowering their price, I know that they're not making any money. I think it's looking long-term and ... Man, you make a whole heck of a lot more money long-term wise, and people go, "Well, I'm not going to start my price at 97. I want to sell it at 500." I'm thinking, "But if you sell 10 because it's at 97, you not only get people in the room or units in your class, you're not losing ... You're losing money if you price it at 500 and nobody buys it because your offer isn't a $500 offer."

Fred Gleeck:
Okay. Let's use the real life scenario here. My new voice over client got ... He was talking so much about the voice over business, but just because it's going on. My newest client is another one of the other big shots in that industry, this guy named Dave Fennoy who is ... He's done a ton of voices for video games.

Lance Tamashiro:
I was showing his stuff to some of my friends. I was like, "You guys ever heard of this guy?" and I played the Hulu thing. Everybody knows him from Hulu. "Oh, that's the Hulu guy."

Fred Gleeck:
That's what he goes by. He's the Hulu guy, but he also happens to be just a really good guy, super nice, great person, and has done tons of video game voices for all ... Literally, he's in IMDB as one of the 20 greatest video voices of all time. We're going to be a doing a seminar with him June 10th through the 12th in Los Angeles. 10th, which is a Friday, and again, he ... I'm becoming the person that's handling this side of the business, the training side of his business. I am sitting there with this kind of situation. He can only have and do training for 16 people, because we want to do it in a studio, and he can't really give personal attention. That's the 2-day part, and that's Saturday and Sunday.

Friday, we do a 7 to 9pm 50 bucks, sort of his basic for all the people who aren't willing to pay the bigger price for Saturday and Sunday, but we want to have that. People who paid for Saturday and Sunday, they can come to that for free. He's never charged a whole lot of money for it, and so I said to him, "If we're only 16 people, Dave, you're the man, or at least one of the man, people, not to be sexist here, who is a person everybody knows in this industry." I said "$997," and he was like, "997 bucks, I've never charged more than that." I said, "No, no, no, no." First off, we only have 16 people, you are the person. I wasn't able to get him to go for that, but I said, "Look, I'm from Vegas, we got to do 777 then.

He agreed to that. Now we're doing a Friday night event and then Saturday, Sunday. Here's my question for you. What do you think? He's got 13,000 Twitter followers. We do not have an established list. I said to him, "Bill would happy to promote it for you." I said ... Bill, we were standing right here, I'd say, "We don't really want to pay Bill unless we have to. We can fill all these seats ourselves." Now, what's a strategy you think for him, given the fact that we're just starting with no list?

Lance Tamashiro:
The first thing I would do is definitely get those out to the Twitter people, but here's something that I think that a lot of people without list, but have an established blog, an established following, are missing out on, and that is re-targeted marketing. He's got a blog that people go to. He's got a site that people go to. You can go ... Their service the one that we use is called AdRoll, A-D-R-O-L-L.com, AdRoll.com. They give you tracking link that you stink on the bottom of your websites, your blogs, anything at all that you've got. What happens is that they have media contracts with everybody, with Google for AdWords, with Facebook on Facebook Ads, with every site.

Have you ever noticed that sometimes you're like on Facebook, or on CNN, or some site, and you're like, "That's weird that I see back up creator ad from ... or anybody." It's like, "I was just at their site, or I just bought a car, or I just ... Now I'm seeing their ads everywhere." That's what they're doing. It's called retargeting. The cool thing about it is it's super cheap because you're targeting a list of just people that have visited your website. You put this tracking code on there, and then you make a creative. That way you can at least follow them around for really cheap. It will come out to 50 cents to a dollar per click. That's in our industry, which is a little more expensive. I don't know what ads cost in that.

If it was anywhere even between a dollar or $2 per click, what you know about those people is, one, they know who he is. 2, they've been to his website, so they're a hot ... It's not like you're just throwing stuff out there, like on AdWords, or you're like, "I'm just going to advertise the voice over seminar or something like that." I would do that, and I would use Twitter to drive traffic to a website, not necessarily the seminar website, although you might want to do some to the seminar website. If he made a video of him ... The one thing that I've noticed that the voice over crowd love is they like to see people actually recording stuff. That's the one thing I see with Bill's stuff.

If he said, "I'm going to record. Here's a recording of me in the studio, doing an ad for XYZ, or just practicing." or "Here's what I do when I do this." People would all flip out, and now you're building a list without building a list, if that-

Fred Gleeck:
Here's what my plan is. I've already scheduled, and I forget what the dates are, but if anybody is ... You'll eventually find it, which is we're going to be doing 2 webinars, one in April, one in May, that are free. Free webinars in which he's going to talk about what we're going to cover. I'm going to get some stuff, and I'm going to pick one person where he will do a live coaching session that he would do if all of them ... The reason why I ask to narrow it to 16 people is all of them get private coaching on how they read for these characters.

Lance Tamashiro:
What I was thinking as you were saying ... That's the first thing. The second thing is you can target URLs in Google AdWords. There's this voice over bulletin board. There's these things. You can even target within those. Those a place in-

Fred Gleeck:
A page within a page.

Lance Tamashiro:
Right, a page within a site. You can put in that URL. You can write an ad. We used to run one. We resell wish list members, and we do membership training. There was this really popular blog post that we found that had AdWords on it. We used to run an ad that said like, "Welcome users of ... Here's the special 4 because we knew where the ad was running, so we could customize the ad for those specific people. You can do stuff like that.

Here's the big thing. I think just as selling seminars or selling high ticket products in general, it doesn't matter, but I think the biggest problem is the mindset shift that people need to get out of, what their worth is. I think $800, you're talking about a minimum of 16 hours of him teaching, 8 hours a day. Then you factor in lunch, travel, hanging out with people before, after all those things. Literally, this guy is going to put in 25 hours of work. You start running the math backwards on what his hourly rate is, minus travel, minus hotels, minus rooms, minus all of this stuff, it's not as big.

People like to look at the number, people like to say, "Oh my gosh. This guy ran a launch, and it was XYZ." You start running the numbers backwards, it ain't as much as people think it is. $800 to get 16 hours of training, you're talking about ... What is that? $50 an hour.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
When you start comparing ... I think that's one of the things that we always try to do when we're making an offer is ... Yes, the number might feel big at first, but you can minimize that number really quick when you go, "Here is what it would cost to get a demo cut." Most coaches charge a 125 per hour. You're going to get 1 on 1 with this guy. All of a sudden, it starts to look really cheap. I think that’s a sales team that whether you're struggling with pricing high, look at what your real number are, and all of a sudden, even a thousand dollars looks cheap.

Fred Gleeck:
Okay. You and I probably will disagree on this, but it's good for people to hear this. In the copy that I'm writing for this particular thing, which by the way I think is going to be ... It's a voice acting for videogames.com or voice acting for games.com. Both of them go to the same place, not up yet. If you're listening to this right away, it may or may not be up by the tie you hear this on the podcast. What I'm doing there is given the fact that I'm certain we're going to sell the 16 seats, my guess is that we're holding it here in Los Angeles. My guess it that 50% of the people, maybe more, will be local. 8 to 10 people are going to be from this area, driving distance definitely.

I'm going to immediately put in there in my copy. We are going to be selling the recordings of this program. It's going to be 3.97 until June 1st. Then after that it's going to be 4.97. The question is to you ... I know that lot of times, you don't like advertising the fact that you're recording something in advance. Whereas, in this case, since I have a maximum number of people, would you change your ... Are you okay with doing it that way?

Lance Tamashiro:
I wouldn't, and here's why. I don't want people buying the recording instead of showing up live. The first thing-

Fred Gleeck:
I think we're going to sell out.

Lance Tamashiro:
The first thing I want is to sell the 16, and then announce the recording. In that way then it's an extra nice bonus for the people that show up live, even though you didn't put it on there or put that they'll get a recording, but I wouldn't sell the recording until it's sold out.

Fred Gleeck:
Okay. Let's say for example that we're holding the seminar June 10th through 12th, and let's just say that by May 1st it sold out. Now, do we advertise on the site?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. All you can get is the recordings. Again, this is personal preference thing, this is me, but this was a big fad that started in the internet marketing business seminar thing a couple of years ago where they started selling live streams. I know for me personally, I could go into seminars. Why would I go spend $2,000 to go to a seminar that I really wanted to only see 1 or 2 speakers anyway, when I could by the stream for $37 and be at home on my schedule in my house on my thing and get the same experience. For a while at the internet marketing seminars, they would say come to the thing or buy the stream, and I bought the dang stream because it was easier for me.

Fred Gleeck:
Cheaper. You didn't have to ... In other words ... In that case, let's say that those internet marketing folks have filled all of their seats, at that point you'd up a live stream.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. If it's legitimately full, I would just say stack how you want to sell it. Why take somebody that was willing to come to the live event and they go, "Hmm. I'll just stay home and get the recording."?

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. That makes a lot of sense. I think that make sense to do it that way. As soon as you've already filled it up and you're at capacity, you then move to selling the recording. I think, yeah, that's a good strategy.

Lance Tamashiro:
I do think that webinar is a fantastic idea, and it doesn't matter whether you're selling a seminar, coaching, software, training, whatever it is, I think webinars and videos are awesome, and the reason is because you can give them the experience of what it is without them even knowing that they're getting that experience. If it's software and you're just demonstrating the software, people see it and go, "Oh my gosh, I need to be able to do that." makes it an easy sale.

We sell a coaching program just like I know you guys do as well. What we do is we try to get people on the phone for a free coaching session, so that they feel that it's like how we coach them, the kind of advice that we give them. Then at the end we say, "If you like this, we also have XYZ program that is the same thing, and here's what it is." All of a sudden they go, "Oh, I know what that is now. Now it makes sense. I can buy that."

Fred Gleeck:
I want to hear that pitch. Okay. You and I, we've just finished our 15-minute free call. When do you do that? What does it sound like?

Lance Tamashiro:
Usually, how we end our coaching calls is we'll say ... We have a time limit and we'll say, "We're running out of time here, so let's get your last question and then make sure that whatever you need the most gets answered." That way they know that they're wrapping it up and then there's no more back and forth. They as their last question, we give them the answer, and then we say, "We had a great time doing this with you. It's nice to get to know you and see your business. We have a lot of other ideas that we think we can add on for you. Why don't you go and check out this program here? It's an awesome value. It's pretty easy. It's always there for you. We'll send you a link. We'll do whatever."

You don't have to do a hard sale pitch after you've just spent 30 minutes with somebody coaching. It's "You know what I do, do you want more of this? Here's where to get it?"

Fred Gleeck:
Right. There's no hard sell, it's just like, "Hey, you've seen me do this, here's the link. If you want it, get it."

Lance Tamashiro:
I think in the coaching industry, so many people, they're so afraid of giving it all away. We've talked about this before. My take on all of that is there's always more questions. The more that you can give away, the absolute better. If I've just solved what you thought was every one of your questions, and you go and implement everything that I just told you, that's going to raise more questions than you had. It's going to raise questions you didn't even know you had. That' when they need to come back to you.

Fred Gleeck:
Here's an example. I think I may have told you about this. I was checking an inventory of what I'm really, really good at. I was mentioning it to my wife yesterday. I said you know the one thing that I'm probably better at that anything else is I've done over 2,000 interviews with business people. I've done 2,000 interviews talking to them, asking them questions, picking their brain. I have this site. I have this program I did years ago with Kerry Dean, called ExpertInterviewer.com.

ExpertInterviewer.com, and for anybody who's thinking about going to the site, please wait a while because you can get all this for free. Here's where I'm going. My whole idea is that I think I can show people how to be a better interviewer, number 1, or a couple of other things related to that topic. What I'm going to do is I just downloaded ... I hadn't seen my own audio program. I downloaded it. I'm going to get it transcribed. I'm going to put the audios and the transcriptions up for free on the site.

At ExpertInterviewer.com, if you go there and it's not free, do not buy it. Wait until it's up there for free. Now, my goal would be, at the bottom of the site to say, "Hey, if this stuff gets you excited, you want more information, click here to schedule." I'm going to try and get some of the scheduling program you're talking about. "Click here to schedule a 15-minute free call." Any thoughts?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think it's good. I think that the one thing about the interview model in general is there's so many routes you can go to monetize it, from the obvious ones of just packaging them up and selling them, to podcast, to training programs. I think that the one thing ... I get a lot of people that they say, "Why are you doing so many interviews for your podcast? Why are you reaching out to that?" The part that people don't see is that my networking. I'm not doing it ... Yes, I'm doing it to provide value for the listeners and do all that, but I haven't even started monetizing my podcast.

When people look at it, they're like, "You don't run ads. You don't do anything. You're just putting it out there. Why?" What the part that they don't see is all of the connections that I'm making on the backend with these people. I think for me there's so many ways to monetize the interview model, some that are really obvious, some that aren't. One of our best-selling books is a collection of interviews that's just transcribed and put together. It's just straight the interviews. Yeah, I think that it's an easy way to create lots of content. You're never going to run out of people to interview in any niche that you're in. I've never had somebody say, "No, you can't interview me."

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. I always call myself ... I don't know if you've heard me use this a lot, but I think I used it one time on a [inaudible 00:25:44]. I call myself Mr. Stupid because I go, "I think I have asked Mr.Stupid.com." because I think that many times when people are listening to one person just blab on about something, there's always ... I'm the one that wants to ask the question that I'm hoping that my listeners are saying, "Yeah. Hey, Fred, good question. That's what I would've asked him as well." I'm trying to service their advocate rather ... When people get on and they record programs with just them talking to the mic or looking into the camera talking, I think that's really ... I don't care if your Tony Robins. I don't think it's nearly as effective as doing a back and forth like what we're doing here.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I agree, and it's easier to listen to, and it's easier for the people doing the content.

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely.

Lance Tamashiro:
It's always easier. As a trick that I used to do, because I don't do this anymore, when I would write blog post or try to come up with my podcast stuff, I would always start with a question as fi somebody asked me. "Lance, what do you think about XYZ?" Suddenly it became easier for me to write a blog post rather than ... If I was going to write a blog post on how to pod cast, I'd be like, "Okay. How do I do this?" If I picture somebody asking me the question how to podcast, that one little weird trick in your brain triggers something. If somebody asks you a question, you have to answer it, versus starting with a statement.

Fred Gleeck:
I don't think we've discussed it on your podcast here, but I think one of the things you talk about making things easier for yourself. The one thing that I've done, I don't know if we've discussed this. If I have, excuse me for repeating myself, but I have come up with what they term a schema for putting all of my affiliate relationships is. For example, mine is coolblanktool.com. Have we talked about that?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think that's a great idea. Any system is a good system.

Fred Gleeck:
The reason why I did that is because whenever I was talking in front of a group or talking like you and I would always be sitting there going, "Oh man, I know I've got an affiliate deal with someone having to do with websites, so coolwebsitetool.com." I think that people ... If you want to make your life easier, come up with systems. You guys are great at that. You and Robert always do stuff. By the way, one of the things that was brilliant last night, which we talked about on our fiber discussion, was the idea, you should talk about this right now because I want to hear what your take is on it, of getting people to go back to a member's area to click on the 4 things that they have to do. Explain to people listening why they should be doing this for themselves, why it's so effective.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes. Our strategy with membership site is different in most people. Most people that I see they’ll sell a program, they’ll post the videos, and that’s it, so you go there once to sign in. Our strategy with membership site is something completely different where it's, we want ... I felt like a lot of people create products and they don’t really want people to go through them. They’re afraid of refunds. They’re afraid of negative feedback, whatever it is. Our strategy is we want people to consume our products. We want people to see them and we want people to think that we’re different than all of our competitions because we are. That’s how you get people coming back to buy from you.

What we do is we build in what we call sticky components into our websites. We want people logging in into our membership sites every day. We don’t want people to forget about us. We want to be Facebook. We want to be Gmail. We want to be all of the sites where even though it’s training, we want you in our site. We create tools like in the class we’re doing right now, we have templates. Fill in the blank where they don’t have to write anything, they can click on a few things, customize it, click a button, so what happens? They have to comeback every time they want to use that template. Now, they’re thinking about us again. They’re looking at the training again. They’re remembering that they’ve got to do something.

What we’ve added in to the member’s area now is an area where we’ve got some certain task that we think the people need to be doing every day. We built a little application that basically they go in and it tells them the last time they said, "I did this." It just keeps a real-time counter for them. Every day, they can log in and click it again, and it resets the counter. Then it says, "It’s been 10 seconds since you've done that. It's been one ..." What that does is 2 things. We know that they will get results if they do that. It trains them to the tasks to get the results. Why? Well, then they’re remember me next time they want to buy something that I got them results when nobody else did.

The second thing is it trains them to keep coming back to the member’s area. They’re watching the videos, again, to consume the training. That’s the number one goal is get people to consume your training by building in these sticky things. The next thing that is going to probably be released into that member’s area is a checklist where we’ve got a pie chart of there’s x number steps that you need to do to be successful. Did you click off one? The pie charts start eating the way as they click that up.

Fred Gleeck:
It’s a video percentage too?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. It gives them this gamification, this sticky thing to get them coming back and people go, "Oh, you’ve got all these gimmicks. What I need to do is a gimmick." Yes they're gimmicky, but the whole goal behind is to get people to get result. I think that that gets lost so much in selling product online that the people focus so much on the sales letter and on the selling of the product. The truth is, if you get people results, you will never have a problem selling a product. You don’t even have to sales page. If you get people results and put up a buy button, they will buy if you’ve got them results.

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely. That goes so in opposition to what you and I tend to hate, which is the people who are selling your product only to try and sell the next product in the content as opposed to over delivering the crap out of the original product and having them go, "Hey, when is your next product? I want to buy it."

Lance Tamashiro:
I want to be really clear too. I believe in hypy direct response sales letters. I’m not saying don’t have an over the top sales. Make sure you’re telling the truth, but I believe that people like to get excited. If you deliver on that promise, man, you just hit a homerun. I’m not saying don’t sell hard. What I’m saying is, "Sell hard, and deliver awesome."

Fred Gleeck:
If you want to see an example in this industry, the VOSuccessfulFormula.com is as hypy as sales letter you can get. Now, the people who are in that program after their third week are going, "This is the greatest thing since sliced bread." We hyped the sales letter and then over delivered on it. Those people, the next time we say, "Oh by the way, Lance has new thing." People are going, "Sign me up. I don't care how much it."

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. The other think that we tend to do is not announce everything. That’s a big key. So many people that I see doing products, events, live courses, whatever, is they want to have it all planned. They’ve got the slides down for all the modules beforehand. The truth is that we try to do things fluidly because we don’t know what issues are going to come up.

Fred Gleeck:
Wait, I’m a little confused. What you’re saying is you don’t have a plan and advance, exactly what your deliverables-

Lance Tamashiro:
We have an idea. We’ve got what they’re going to get and how it’s going to get there. The content itself, I mean I’m putting that together right before the webinar, because I want to see where they’re at and where they’re stuck. In that way, if the live people are stuck, the replay people are going to be stuck too. You make a better product by not being too rigid with it. The other thing is we don’t like to tell everything that they’re going to get. Nobody in this class expected the member’s area ... Even you guys, we didn’t tell that some of the tools that were going to be in there, and there are stuff that we just do in all of our stuff, but they didn’t know that.

Transcripts, adding those in, nobody knew that that was coming, and you start adding those things in, even if you know they’re going to be added in, and you don’t tell them, now all of a sudden people are going, "Oh my gosh. This is so worth it."

Fred Gleeck:
I don’t think we talked about this, so it's worth to explaining to our listeners, which is that you are then ... Unbeknownst to the people that are in this program, they’re going to be getting the DVDs. What are they getting? They don’t know this yet, do they?

Lance Tamashiro:
Some are. The [inaudible 00:34:27] members, we’re going to be sending some extra stuff to for free to those members.

Fred Gleeck:
Okay. That stuff is going to be what?

Lance Tamashiro:
It’s going to be a ... Let me see if I can ...

Fred Gleeck:
Do you know yet?

Lance Tamashiro:
Let me see. I'll show you here, one second.

Fred Gleeck:
Okay.

Lance Tamashiro:
I don’t think that you’ve actually seen this stuff before. What we do is we create ... I don’t know if you can see this or not, but we create professionally done DVDs, individual for each module, with printed on silk screen DVD stuff. We create these big old thick manuals with screen shots. This one is close, but full blown books with professional covers. Here’s the reason why.

Nobody is going to throw this stuff away. I’ve got DVDs on my shelf from years ago, because I like the way look. They look cool in my office. If I’m on your bookshelf in your office, and you look up and see this bright orange thing, or this the hypy blue thing, you’re thinking, "Oh yeah. I remember Lance did that for me." Now, I’m in your home. It’s not a business card, it’s a "I'm in your home and you’re looking at me every single day." These things are cheap to do. One DVD with shipping I think is 7 bucks.

Fred Gleeck:
Is that Kunaki? Why do you use?

Lance Tamashiro:
Kunaki. Yeah, Kunaki.com. Then we use Lulu.com for the books. I think this one is $7 shipped or $8 shipped, and it’s 354 pages with color. For customer retention, it’s nothing. It’s nothing off your top end to spend 5%, 3% of the revenue to retain somebody. Yeah. These are some cool little things-

Fred Gleeck:
Again, in your case, we didn’t announce any of this. You’re making a selection as to who’s going to get this way over the top extra. Right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. The people that are in the [inaudible 00:36:39] members, which is Bill's sort of membership site. Here’s the reason. It's good Bill offers people discounts and different things for being in his inner circle, so my whole thought is why not just over deliver the crap out of those people because then they’re never going to go anywhere, and they’re never going to do anything? One of the things that I think that gets lost so much is more than what you sell, and what you do, all people really care about at the end of the day is how you treat them. I think that business, in general, not just online, but specially online, but even offline too, we’ve lost that personal connection, that personal touch.

Everybody talks about know, like, and trust. I’ve never seen anybody that actually implements it. Nobody picks up the phone and calls. Nobody sends stuff. Nobody checks in anymore, but they all talk about know, like, and trust. That’s how you build a business, one person at a time, one phone call at a time. You can have the biggest list in the world. If you talk to them, they will never get off your list, and they will read every email that you send them.

Fred Gleeck:
That’s a great place to end this week’s podcast.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome. As always, everybody thank you for listening. Please go to iTunes, rate and review us. I looked this morning. We are number 22 in the business and marketing section.

Fred Gleeck:
Moving up.

Lance Tamashiro:
Moving up. Thank you guys very much. We will talk to you on the next episode. Have a great day, everybody. Bye now.

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Build a Solid Business & Repurpose Content – Fred Gleeck


This is the weekly special edition with Fred Gleeck. Fred, we have a ton to talk about this week. I brought the music back just for you this week.

Fred Gleeck:
Unbelievable. Listen to that bumper music or whatever we're calling it. I love it. It's great.

Lance Tamashiro:
I know, and you know what's so awesome is we've been doing this voice over class. We've been doing stuff with different people, so what I've figured out is or what's awesome is now I've got a whole bunch of people that I can go to to just make our little intros. People that want to listen to it, and I think it makes it really fun to just do things different. What I like about using people that I know, especially my competition, is I like to see what my competition is up to. I like to stay abreast of what they're doing.

One of the things that I think so many people miss out on is they say, "I'd never buy my competition's products. I'd never support them. I don't care what they're doing." I think the opposite. I like buying my competitors' stuff, one, to see what they're doing, but two, it creates a relationship with them where they're willing to talk to you because you've bought products from them, because they see your name and it opens up a whole different world of opportunity for you.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, and I would add to that that coming up in about 10 days from now, I'm going to some, somebody's holding a live seminar here in the Los Angeles area on Friday and Saturday, talking about putting together and how to do a bestseller book. Well, who's going to go to bestseller books? My target audience is subject matter experts, people who are experts in a topic. I thought, it's $97. First off, I'm a little suspicious by the price. It's a little too cheap, but for 97 bucks there are going to be at least 30 or 40 or 50 prospects for me in that room.

So yeah. Not only buy your competitors' stuff, but ask yourself, "Where are the people that you want to go to? Where do they congregate?"

Lance Tamashiro:
I think that that was one of the hardest things, and still is for me, in my business. When I started my online business, I liked the Internet because nobody was going to have to hear my voice, see my face, I got to sit in my dark basement and hit refresh on the PayPal account. There is, I guess, some truth to all of that, but what I really found is that that's sort of the way it's perceived, but in actuality, anybody that I look at that is successful online, whether they're a giant business or a solo-preneur or a medium-sized company, it's about building that relationship.

It's about doing a lot of stuff that doesn't pay off for a long time, whether that is a podcast where people get to know you more. A lot of people say to me, "Why do you do this podcast all the time? You hardly even talk a lot of it. Most of them are you interviewing other people," but I think what they don't see in it is that I'm building a relationship with a lot of people. I get questions in like, "I want to know about this." "Maybe you should have this person on." Just somebody paying attention to you and getting free information is where it's at.

I think too many people focus on, "What is my sales process?" "What is my autoresponder process?" "How do I get somebody to buy?" That is important, but I mean, podcast, YouTube, blog posts, things that you think are just a waste of time, it's like, you feel like nothing happens for a really long time, and then all of a sudden, for whatever reason, you hit some kind of critical mass where it's like, "Oh my gosh. Everybody's paying attention, and I thought nobody was."

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. It's really funny because for four years, I was number one for the term information marketing in Google. Then they changed their algorithm, and I saw a huge drop-off. I thought to myself, "What do I have to do?" I think you're right. You have to be looking at all of these different methods, whether it's podcasting, blogging, YouTube channels, Instagramming, whatever you do, just think about, "Who is the market you're going after?"

I was just thinking about how, since I've been talking to you, literally now I have, I don't know if I told you this, but one of my most recent clients that I'm signing, we're just in the process of getting things together, is a guy that's a carpenter. Did I tell you at all?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes.

Fred Gleeck:
So here's a guy who, I really like the fact that when I work with people, I'm working with a huge diversity of people, some of whom have no connection to one another, others of whom are connected. I think that people who want to work online - information or Internet marketing - are thinking that they're going to be able to stay away from people. Well, you can and make a living, but your real money is made in interacting with people. Got to.

Lance Tamashiro:
It's a thankless part of the job. I mean, I think that's the hard part, and I think that's why so many people don't do it. I know you're working with a travel guy right now that is starting a YouTube channel, and I actually have a nephew that's 10 years old that's starting a YouTube channel as well. I go and look at it, and it's like, "Man, I can't imagine starting over again," although that's what I did with my podcast when I got it started. But I watch it, and it looks so thankless. It looks so unfulfilling when I go and look and I'm like, "They got 30 views on this video." Then I think, "They got 30 views on this video," like it's brand new and they got 30 views. There is something to that hustle and that putting yourself out there.

What I know is that, for me personally, and I see so many people that want to get it all set up and make it all happen like yesterday. The thing about any business, whether online or offline, is it's a marathon. There are things that you need to put in place, and they can only happen as fast as they happen.

Building a YouTube channel, building a website, building a part-, whatever it is, the key is to recognize that we all want it to be done yesterday, and it can't be done. So setting realistic expectations about, if I do one hour a day on this, whatever this is, YouTube videos.

Maybe the first time you do a YouTube video, you say, "Five days a week I'm going to do a YouTube video." You know what? The first day it might take you an hour. It might take you an hour and a half. Day two, it might take you an hour or an hour and a half, but I guarantee you that if you stick with that for 30 days, 60 days, a year, whatever, however long you're going to commit to doing it, you will compress that hour and a half into one ta-, if you're making a five-minute video, it's going to take you six minutes to do the video and get it up on YouTube. Because the only way you can do that is by that experience, that practice, those repetitions, plus you have the advantage of now you can do it fast, but you've also built all of these assets.

Fred Gleeck:
You mentioned a guy, by the way, everyone should help TravelScrooge. TravelScrooge is a YouTube channel. Tony just started that. He's now produced about 20. The whole idea is a travel minute, giving you a tip. Five days a week, like you just said, for just over a minute. You go to TravelScrooge on YouTube, and he'll give you a great travel idea to get discount travel. His whole thing is bah humbug to overpriced travels.

So he's into showing you techniques and stuff, but again, I told him that, again, the voice over guy, Bill DeWees, it took us, we now have 11,900 people on the YouTube channel for voice over. Tony is just starting. I think he's got three people. Anybody listening to this, go there and support. It's cool stuff. You know, it's travel, but yeah. When you get, I told him, "When we get this started," I told him, "you have to look at it." It took Bill, when he first got started, I think the first year, I don't know if we even had 100 people total. Then it just started to get bigger and bigger and bigger, and that's what happens.

I think that Seth Godin wrote a book called The Dip. I don't know if you've read that.

So The Dip is that between the time that you start something and the time you get to the point where it really starts to take off, it's just fill-in golf, fill-in YouTube channel, fill-in everything. There's this huge gap between when you start something and all the crap you have to go through to the time you finally get it right, and that's called The Dip. How many people will actually tolerate the amount of time it gets to go from day one to day 365, where they go, "Okay. That five-minute YouTube video's now taking me five and a half minutes as opposed to an hour and a half." People won't do that.

Lance Tamashiro:
The way I like to look at it is they quit before the miracle happens. I mean, that's why in the business I've been running for years now, it's always the same thing. We see people come up, they make a big splash, and we just keep doing our thing, doing our thing, and doing the things that matter. Inevitably, and I see this, in all kinds of niches, and it doesn't matter whether you're talking online, whether you're talking golf, whether you're talking whatever, people want it so fast. They think they just deserve it so fast. What I like to say is, it's simple but it's not easy.

Fred Gleeck:
I like that.

Lance Tamashiro:
The reason we've been able to last as long as we can is we consistently do the things that need to be done knowing that we're going to outlast everybody. Because we're not going to burn ourselves. I mean, I watch people. They come online and they're working 18-hour days and then sleeping for two hours and going to their day job, and they're trying to do all this. I'm just like, "Slow down." You're point of building your own business is for lifestyle, not to get it done quicker. So why not just put four hours in every single day consistently.

I guarantee you, nobody believes this, but if anybody actually tracks it, if you just commit to doing four hours every five days a week, seven days a week, whatever, versus what you are doing now, make yourself breathe and go do other things, at the end of 30, 60 days, you will have gotten so much further than what you thought you were doing when you were working 18-hour days and nights and all of this other stuff.

Fred Gleeck:
When I was doing a lot of seminars, I used to use the exact same term. It's simple but it's not easy. But here's another idea that we haven't talked about on this podcast, which I've got an embarrassing admission to make, and I think other people may be in the situation. So let's try to figure out how to fix it. For many years, back in like the mid-'90s, I became the top guy in a niche. I was the top guy in the self-storage industry. Then for some unexplainable reason, I just kind of lost interest, and I let it kind of die. So I'm thinking to myself, "Wait a second. I've got all this material that I developed for them. I've got a ton of knowledge. Is there a way to revitalize something that you let go a while back? How would you do that?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I think that first of all, this goes back to being connected to people. Because what I find for me personally in my business is you're going to go through those, you're going to go through that excitement, those ups and downs. If you didn't, you'd never get excited. It would just always be the same, right?

So the question is, how do you deal with those downs so that you don't walk away from it? I do think that sometimes you just need to take some R&R, whatever that is. I try to play golf. I try to go do things with my family to keep myself energized and remember why I do all this, but the more important part to me is the connections that you make with people. I think that's what keeps you energized and stuff, and I think that's where so many people go wrong. This is not an I business or a me business. Even if you're the only person that works in your company, this is a people business. I think when you realize that, that helps to energize you - staying connected with other people.

As far as revitalizing something that is dead, I mean, I think the big mistake that everybody on the Internet makes, myself included, is that we assume everybody knows everything that we've done, everybody has read everything that we've written, everybody has seen every video that we've done, heard every podcast, and the truth is, nobody cares about what you do. Nobody really pays attention. You're lucky if people pay attention to 10% of the stuff that you do. If you've got a 20, 30-minute podcast, you're lucky if 2% of the people you tell about it listen to it.

One of the biggest revelations that I've had recently is that even if they have listened, for example, we do a lot of webinars. For the most part, they don't change. They are, depending on what product we are pitching, they are canned presentations. We just pull out the old PowerPoint, give the presentation. We have customers that have been with us for four, five, six years that have seen that presentation 40 times.

Every time we do it, we're like, "Why do they keep showing up?" The answer to that is, people don't always, one, remember that they saw it, two, they always pick up something new. I mean, you're going to hear a message differently depending on where you are in your business, in your growth, in whatever it is.

Three, people like to be reinforced that what they believe is true. So if they hear your message, it kind of goes back to, there used to be an old advertising thing that said you've got to make contact seven times before you make a sale. I think part of that is not so much even just that, "I'm back again. I'm back again. You've seen my brand." I think it is that subconsciously they get a message embedded in their head of, "I've heard of this," and they start to think that it was their idea or it was the thing that they've had. So when they hear that message over and over with advertising, at some point their brain clicks and goes, "I was right. I knew that Downy was the best softener or drier pad in the market." Then they go and buy it, and they don't even know where that came from, but it's that repetition.

I think that if you've got old stuff, and one of the things I've been doing lately is-

Fred Gleeck:
In my case, I've got a ton of old stuff in that industry, so I was thinking about putting together a whole, like put it behind a paywall and just say, "Here it is. $97," or whatever it is.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I mean, I think that that's definitely a way to put it out there. I mean, make some of it free, pieces of it free. Put it out there. One of the things I've been doing is revitalizing my Twitter account. I mean, I had a Twitter account years ago that I did nothing with. What I've done in the last, I guess, 60 days or so, maybe not even that long, maybe 30 to 60 days, is I bought a service called eClincher.com. What it is is it just schedules tweets over and over. You just set up a queue and it, just every hour or whatever you set it up for, it sends out the exact same thing.

So what I've been doing is, I've just been going in and when we do a podcast, I schedule that podcast to get put out there. When I have a replay that I'm promoting in my other business, I put it in there so that it goes out there. It's crazy to me. Every single tweet gets retweeted, liked, and I'm like, "It's the same thing that I put out eight hours ago," but with Twitter especially, the timeline moves so fast that it doesn't bother people. I mean, if you did this on Facebook, people would be annoyed.

On Twitter it seems to be okay, and reusing all of that stuff, I mean, you've got a ton of content. Use it and get it out there to as many people as you can. People don't mind. I mean, I've seen Star Wars I don't know how many times. I've seen Billy Madison a million times. So think about how you consume information and know that your market is the same as you.

Fred Gleeck:
Mine is, I always ask people, "What's the movie you've watched more than any other single movie?" To me, it's Groundhog Day.

Lance Tamashiro:
Mine is Young Frankenstein.

Fred Gleeck:
Young Frankenstein. Wow. Nice.

Lance Tamashiro:
So, yeah, I think that take it out and sell it. I don't care what niche you're in or whatever, I mean. If you've got an audience or even just information, if it's sitting on your hard drive, I can tell you that you have zero chance of it doing anything for you. If you have a sales page, it can do something for you.

Fred Gleeck:
It can do something for you. Let me bring up this point, which I think is kind of interesting. I got somebody who's about to sign on as a client, and one of the things that they said was, "Hey. I really want to start doing this kind of work and doing training in my niche," etc. etc. It's kind of frustrating because they want to jump from doing the inexpensive stuff, they're thinking of the three-camera shoot in the big auditorium and having the video produced and all that stuff.

What would you say to someone like that to try and get them to understand? Because I said, "Look. Why don't we start with something like a webinar because it's super inexpensive to produce, we have virtually no cost associated with it? We make money when the first person signs up." So what do you say to the person who again is looking to jump way ahead?

Lance Tamashiro:
I think, like anything else, it's a marathon, not a sprint. I mean, my problem with the people that I see that do that, and I've had friends throughout the years that they wouldn't just do a video. I mean, I've got no problems just doing a one-take, I mean, there was one, I don't know if you saw this one, but I did a video for a class that we're currently doing. In the middle of it, my daughter came in and started talking to me and asking me for breakfast. I left it in, and the reason is is because, and I know a lot of people that would have started, they would have scrapped everything, started over, spent an hour trying to edit it.

My thing is, I see people that try to do these fancy videos or fancy audios, and the truth is, get out whatever you've got now that's easy. Because it's easy to go, "Oh, you know what would be awesome? Now I've figured out how to make a podcast. It would be cool to play some intro music at the beginning," and then add that in. "Oh, it would be cool to have a commercial," and then add that in. What most people do is they go, "I've got to have all of this stuff in place before I do anything," and what ends up happening is they do nothing.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah. I don't know if you've heard my line because it sounds like, if I wouldn't have known better, it sounds like you were listening to my material from like 10 or 15 years ago. Because I always use the line, done is better than perfect, and then when producing info products, I would say, "If the dog barks, leave it in. Why? Because you look to the people that you're trying to contact as much more real and human as opposed to having every single "uh" taken out." It doesn't work.

Lance Tamashiro:
You know, one of the things I'm always real careful of is, I know some guys in the niche that I'm in that created personas for themselves that they thought were really interesting and different, and they were. I mean, they're definitely different, and I know you know of one of the guys that I'm talking about. The problem is is that they create this persona online, and then when you meet them in person, you're like-

Fred Gleeck:
It's not them.

Lance Tamashiro:
… you're like, "Who are you? Where is the guy that I've seen with this?" and "You're always in suits," or "You're always dressed this way, and now you're wearing a baseball hat or doing this thing." There is a, to me, and it's just me, and I know a lot of these guys are really successful in what they do, but to me, as a consumer, when I see that disconnect, I subconsciously think, "What else are they lying to me about?"

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely agree.

Lance Tamashiro:
So I think that you're right. That level of relatableness, that level of he said "uh." If you talk to me in real life, I say like and uh and all the things that you hear me say on the podcast because I don't edit them. There is a, I guess my thing is, be very careful about the persona that you create. It's way easier to just be the person that you are.

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely. If you're being you, you don't have to remember, "What am I supposed to be?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I see that trap so many times. It works for some people, and for some people it doesn't. I mean, I think, I just think you've got to be careful.

Fred Gleeck:
I remember the whole campaign the guy did with the rich jerk.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah. I'm not talking about that guy, but I mean, same thing.

Fred Gleeck:
It's kind of like people come up with these things, and I really wonder to myself, "Is this the real thing?" and then somebody will, but I've seen, I've had people come to me saying, "Oh, you know. I spent $25,000 with so-and-so, and I am in debt, and I am still paying off my credit card, and I didn't get anything out of it." I thought to myself, "My god, what did they do that convinced you to give them 25 grand and you've got nothing for it?" I think that that, in this industry, is really a problem.

Lance Tamashiro:
You know, I think, I kind of go back and forth with that. I do think there are some people that are selling things and delivering nothing. I mean, I've bought a lot of that stuff, but then there are also people that are buying things that are doing nothing.

Fred Gleeck:
True.

Lance Tamashiro:
I think that the truth in that story is probably somewhere in the middle. So it's back to the whole thing. I mean, I don't, I personally, when I see something new and exciting come in my email box, I look at it for the marketing aspect of it. I buy it if it's something that I can use today.

So, Robert and I, my business partner, Robert Plank, we have a rule that anything that we invest in has to be at least to some set degree of finished in three days because that's my excitement level. I mean, I can stay interested in something for about three days. So if I look at something and go, "Man, it would be awesome to have xyz course that I just looked at." The first thing I do is look at my calendar and go, "Do I have time to implement whatever portion of it that I want to to get my value out of it in three days?" If I don't, then it goes to the trash.

It'll come back around. I mean, it will come back around. That's a marketing tactic is for the scarcity, but what I find is, who cares if I buy something and never use it? Big deal. I mean, I've got a folder that is stuff I'm going to get to. I never get to it. I mean, who am I kidding? It just is taking up space on my drive. So if you can consume whatever it is, and if you can't, you don't need it right now. Whatever you need will show up when it's time for it to show up for you. If you believe that and have that attitude, you'll get a lot further and you'll spend a heck of a lot less money.

Fred Gleeck:
That's a good place to end today's podcast.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome. Well, as always, we appreciate you guys being here. Make sure that you tune in next week. Also, head over to iTunes, subscribe, leave a comment, rate and review. We are doing incredible over there thanks to each and every one of you. So, again, we will talk to you on the next episode of the Lance Tamashiro Show. Bye now.

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Capturing a New Market – Fred Gleeck

Lance Tamashiro:
We are here again with Fred Gleeck for our weekly update and call. Fred, I mean, a lot of exciting things have happened. I hear people got kicked out of memberships, people got kicked out of sites. We built a really cool new program that I think is going pretty well.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, that's an understatement Lance. Last night we had the first of our five webinar series for the voice over folks. By the way, for those of you who are listening, this is one of my many niches so Lance may be appearing at a theater near you in another niche to help me at some point in the future. Yeah, some people got really annoyed given the fact that you were showing them a completely different way to do things that would work, that many of the ... It's like the establishment players, I mean we're now in the political season. The establishment players don't like Bill, don't like what we're doing.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and what I love about what we did here ... Just so everybody knows, basically we started a course in the voice over niche teaching people how to make money a different way than what the establishment or the main people in the niche think you should do it, or how you should do it, and how you should progress. There's a lot of people upset but there's also a lot of people that are really happy. I think that this is a great lesson in any niche, in anything that you do, is to differentiate yourself. If you find something that works that is different, man ... I think the neat thing about it is you get so much attention and you're so different from how everything else looks that people can't help but to pay attention with you. At the end of the day, I mean, whatever your niche is in, that's great but you're also a marketer and so you apply that marketing, I mean everything changes.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, one of my early niches and which by the way we may want to revisit at some point. I was involved very many years ago in the self storage industry and after the main association there, got really annoyed at my tactics, similar to what we're doing here. I then put on everything of mine banned by the SSA. Banned by the Self Storage Association. It was sort of like a badge of honor kind of thing. Hold on, let me get this real quick. I got a thing going, hold on.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, no problem. I totally agree about it being this badge of honor I guess. I think the point is is that in any marketing that you do, no matter what it is, if you can stir some emotion ... I think what happens way too often, especially online is a niche gets sort of, this is the way that we do it and we did a couple of things that were way different. First of all the method was completely backwards of what the establishment wants and personally, my own personal view is they want it the way that it's always been done because it keeps the successful people successful. It hurts the new people but it also creates a revenue stream for the successful people. Not only did we teach people how to do something different, in a way we're dipping into their pocket books. Now the reason I don't mind that is because at the end of the day if people get results, if people are happy, but the attention you get when you buck the system is you're new. We did a couple of things different. I mean, normal selling in this niche was a blog with a list of PayPal buttons. There was no description of what you were buying it was just you buy because I'm an expert and you're not. The first thing we did was we came out with a direct response sales letter like you see in the internet marketing niche. We didn't know how people were going to respond to that and they responded in two ways, one they really liked it and bought because they had never seen it. Two they were really upset because it brought that infomercial direct response sales to niche that had never seen it. Now in my head I'm thinking what other niches aren't using direct response because [crosstalk 00:04:06] response is crazy.

Fred Gleeck:
I'm in some of those so we'll be seeing those coming to a theater near you.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and the other thing that was interesting for me is that I've been in the niche that I've been in for years now and it was interesting for me to go outside ... I mean I was pretty nervous, I knew that the press against me, what the establishment was telling the people that had bought was this is a scam, this is not going to work, you're not going to like this. Honestly it was the first time in years of teaching course, of doing lectures that I didn't know what was going to happen. I didn't know how it was going to be [crosstalk 00:04:50].

Fred Gleeck:
I was confident in you.

Lance Tamashiro:
It was also a different format for me. I mean most of my teaching goes a lot longer, it's a lot more technical people so I had to sort of change up the way that it went and I think the lesson is that however you teach, whatever you do in your niche you can take that stuff to other audiences and it's fun. It was the first time in a long time that I've been excited and nervous to teach a class. My wife was ... I was upstairs eating before I came down to do that and she's like, "I haven't seen you like this in years." This nervous, and I was telling her there's a large group of people rooting against me tonight. I feel a little more pressure than I normally did but it was fun. It turned out really great.

Fred Gleeck:
I think one of the things that I noticed ... By the way, if everybody's curious about what this is if you go to vosuccess, vosuccessformula.com you'll see what we're talking about. I think we've discussed it before on this podcast but they should know that. One of the things that I found interesting is after the event, all the comments that we were getting related to what I saw which is how I teach, which is making sure that you don't leave out steps. I think people's biggest frustration is that so many times they have been sold this program that gives them A, B, C, D, skip E, F, G, H, skip I, and then you have to pay more to get the letters that were missed as they were giving you the training which is absolute and complete nonsense.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, so we sort of ... Our philosophy in all of our training and I think no matter what niche you're in you should adopt this philosophy is we always start planning any of our training with they're at point A, we need to get them to point B.

Fred Gleeck:
Correct.

Lance Tamashiro:
If you know what point B is, it helps you in a couple of ways, first of all it makes selling the product really easy because you know what you can promise and you know that you can deliver. The second thing that's awesome about this is that you know what they need after they finish. If you take somebody from whatever point A is, where they're at currently and you know for a fact you've got them to point B, you know what the next thing they need is to sell them when they get to that point. I think what happens to so many marketers is they leave stuff out because they're worried about monetizing the next thing, what can I sell them? The truth is you build rabid fans, you build people that are looking to buy stuff and you know exactly what they need if you get them to that point B. The other thing that we do is we always try to do stuff basically in four modules, sometimes we have to do more. For this one we did a Q and A, but what we like to do in the very first module and I joined so many courses where they're like ... The first module I finish it and I'm like, "Everything that you gave me was on the sale. You just read me the sales letter."

Fred Gleeck:
Forget the first module, how many times ... I've actually done this on training courses where I've taken module one, or whatever it is, and I've watched after it takes them twelve minutes to get past the introduction, to view content. I'm like, "Wait a second, I can just delete the first twelve minutes of this. All you're doing is congratulating yourself for who you are and what you do."

Lance Tamashiro:
Or it's pre-sales, or sales stuff. What we always try to do is no matter what it is, we want to give people ... This is the opposite, so most courses by the end of module four or the end of the course, you're lucky if you got what they promised you. Our philosophy is, we flip that. In module one we want you to have everything you need so if you didn't do anything besides module one, you got a big portion of the result that we promised. Last night, for example, we got people up, running, and how to make sales. I mean, in most courses that's the end if you even get to that. We do the same in all of our stuff. If it's setting up membership sites, we don't want you to wait until module six to have your membership site up, we want it in module one. The reason is, is that's how you reduce refunds. That's how you look different, and that's how you build trust with new buyers.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, reduce refunds and increase add-on sales once your done because you gained their trust. They know you deliver, in fact you over deliver and so therefore they're actually asking you, "Hey what do you got next? What more can I buy from you?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and I think that if more marketers would think this way rather than worrying about the next sale, worry about delivering what you promised and the next sale will take care of itself.

Fred Gleeck:
Absolutely agree and I've seen that throughout. I'm thinking, it's really interesting because I want to give you an example of who I just met with before I got here. I got a new client who signing a contract tomorrow, you're going to love this niche. Okay, so this guy, I met him at the same coffee shop that I just saw him at now and we started chatting, and we've been talking for a while. Come to find out he's a carpenter but he's not any carpenter, he's a carpenter that specializes in doors. Apparently people who are in the carpentry and construction business, when they get to the doors they just go, "Forget it, we need somebody else." We're establishing two methods for this guy to make money. Number one is to sell their services to other carpenters, dooruniversity.com I reserved. We're going to get other carpenters to come learn his system, to double their hourly rate by learning how to do doors properly. Then also, the ancillary benefit is he didn't even own his own name.com so I registered his own name.com and I said, "Greg, here's what we're going to do," it's Greg [Perolio 00:10:16] if you're in Southern California and need a door, look for that ... I mean this guy knows what he's doing.

The whole idea is there are some really interesting, very, very weird type niches that can produce revenue and my philosophy, as I think is your as well, which is I don't want to have my revenue sources coming from just one place. I want to have ... I actually think I own ahundredchecksamonth.com the whole idea is I want to revenue from multiple, multiple sources coming in. I don't care if this one only brings in fifty or sixty thousand, whatever it is, it's a cool little niche that I knew nothing about.

Lance Tamashiro:
One of the things and I mean you don't have to do it this way but to think really big with the door guy for example, and you can do this in any niche, is he creates a system that is whatever his name is door hanging, making, whatever he does system.

Fred Gleeck:
It had to be [inaudible 00:11:09] let me hear what you have to say.

Lance Tamashiro:
You create a name for it, then what you do is you sell training to people, other carpenters, other whatever to do that. Then what you do is you certify them for taking your course in this system. You create a membership site [crosstalk 00:11:29].

Fred Gleeck:
We're going to give them territories by zip code.

Lance Tamashiro:
You can do that but then what you do is you create a directory of all the members, charge them forty seven, ninety seven dollars a month, whatever it is to be a member on the directory certified in this particular thing. Then what he has to do is no longer be a carpenter, he is now a trainer with this passive income stream and all he has to do is go out and market the system so that clients are looking to the system driving all the traffic back to the main website. They get to the website and they're looking at the directory for somebody in their area that can do the system. He turns into making YouTube videos, getting on local media, just talking to no longer the carpenters but to the consumers about the problems if they're getting a remodeling. That way the consumers go to the people and start saying, "But I want it done this way." We've done this with one of our plastic surgeon people and basically all he does is promote his procedure and he has doctors contacting him saying, "My patients heard about this, wherever they heard about it. How do I get certified to be able to say I do that procedure." His whole marketing is just talking about what he knows.

Fred Gleeck:
The conversation that you just ... The last couple minutes of your talking is exactly what I told him actually the time we met previously and I put it down in a form where this is exactly what we're going to be doing. The thing about it is, since he really likes the business he'll just be able to do less of it and make more money.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, yeah. Exactly. I mean, I think that that's the whole thing. So many people have this mental block about how they move from what they do, which is for a lot of us it's one to one. If you're a doctor you only make money when you're seeing patients. If you're a carpenter you only make money when you're hanging doors or whatever it is. I think the big mindset shift that I think everybody listening needs to make is it doesn't matter how you make money now one to one, there is a way for you to make money one to many and passive. If you can figure that out that's when things change for you.

Fred Gleeck:
The way that I described it one time speaking to a group of asset protection attorneys, is I said, "Look, you guys have acquired all this knowledge, you know a lot about accounting and you know a lot about assets." I said, "The biggest asset that you have right now is sitting between your ears and it is unsold inventory. I'm in the business of taking what's in your head, shaking it all out onto a table, separating it into piles, and then selling it so that you can take that unsold inventory and monetize it so that you can make more money."

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean, one of the best speakers I've ever seen, I'm sure you know him or at least his dad is JJ Childers who is a tax attorney. I've bought his two thousand dollar package that is audio CD's talking about tax strategies for small businesses. The up-sell is the five or ten thousand dollar done for you business set up and tax plan but I mean that's the perfect example. This guy is a tax attorney and goes around the country selling CD's. I mean literally at two thousand dollars a pop. Does he still get tax clients, sure, but he makes a heck of a lot more money selling his tax information.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, and I mean the big objection that I've always heard from everybody is, "Well if I teach everybody how to do this then they'll all do it themselves and I won't get any business." In fact, they'll get halfway through the program and they'll go, "Oh forget it. Let me just call whoever the guru is and let him do it for me."

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, and I think the whole thing, even giving away all of the stuff ... I mean, a lot of the stuff that we talk about on this podcast is stuff that we talk about with our private groups as well. The thing is is that if you don't know how to do it and if you don't understand, I mean it's one thing for me to say something like, "We'll just set up a membership site with a directory." If you're listening, I've given you all the steps if you know how to set up the membership site and do the directory. Some people get stuck there, some people don't. There's a group of people listening that are like, "I know exactly how to do that, I know exactly what software. I know exactly how to configure it." Then there's a group that's like, "But now at least I know how to do that." I'm a believer in you can give everything away especially in a limited amount of time, you can never give all the details so don't worry about that. In audio, I can tell you my entire system but until you watch it or see it sometimes things are going to get lost in translation. I never worry about saying too much or giving too much. I think that the opposite's true, the more that you establish yourself as the expert, the more people will want to come to you.

Fred Gleeck:
Now I've got something that happened yesterday that you and I haven't talked about yet, that I want your feedback on because I literally started ... I had to almost laugh out loud at someone over this issue. I'm a member of a Facebook group that is a very exclusive community for a specific group, I won't talk about it because God forbid the person will find out. I saw this person who was interested or having ... She had something on her personal webpage about the fact that she was ... she did coaching or something like that. What I did was I had written an article that's Amazon called Marketing to Find Your Ideal Client, is what I called it right? What I did was I took that Amazon link and I put it in the Facebook group and I said, "Hey here's an article that if you are interested in it, I'll be happy to send it to you for free. Please don't buy it on Amazon." I then get a call within 20 minutes from this person ... You have no idea where I'm going, watch this.

She calls me up and says, "Ah, by the way, that thing that you posted on there, it's really making me look like I'm an amateur." I go, "I'm not sure I understand you." She says, "Well, you posted something about finding your ideal client and I'm in that business, and people may look at me and think that I'm just a newbie and getting started." I said, "Time out, I was trying to help you if you needed an additional resource." The idea is this particular individual clearly knows everything there is to know about her topic and needs no ... She doesn't need to read anymore, she doesn't need to talk to anybody else. She apparently knows so much that my even putting something up insinuating that she may need, or may want to gain some additional knowledge is going to quote hurt her brand.

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean, I think the biggest thing that I struggle with and that the private conversations I have with my business partner almost always center around this and it's that we're too much of experts that we have lost touch with our customer base. Meaning that we assume that we know what they ... that they know what we know. We also assume that they want to know it at the level that we know it. The truth of the matter is, one percent of our customers even want to know it the way that we know it.

Fred Gleeck:
They just want to get it done.

Lance Tamashiro:
You're always better off thinking like a newbie in whatever it is that you're teaching or selling because that's where your mass market is. I mean, I've got people that buy our courses that I know for a fact make a million dollars a year doing internet marketing, have been around internet marketing since the beginning but they still like to take the courses because they ... I'm always baffled I'm like, "Why is so and so buying this course, it's about setting up a squeeze page and setting up your auto responder?" Their philosophy is if I can pick up one thing that I didn't know or see one way that you do it that is different than it's worth it for me because I will make the money back. I do the same thing, I buy stuff that people are like, "Why would you buy that?" Because for me, if I spend three hundred dollars on a course I'm literally usually looking for one tip that I know will make me that three hundred dollars and then some.

Fred Gleeck:
Yeah, that's a great concept and I agree. The other flip side to this is people always say to me, "Well, when you do your training," and just like we did last night, "you give people everything from the very, very beginning." Someone will say, "Well what about your people who are a little bit more advanced or in the middle?" I say, "Well here's what happens, when we give them the basics they then pat themselves on the back going I knew that, I knew that until they get to the part where it's like oh I didn't know that." That's one of those great ideas. They like being told what they already know because they know they're doing it right.

Lance Tamashiro:
I think with a training course specifically, you have to get everybody at the beginning on the same page. For example last night, last night was tedious. It was tedious for me, it was a lot of technical stuff, but now we get to focus on the fun stuff. We get to focus on the theory and the strategy, where we couldn't do that ... If we just went in and said, "Blah, blah, blah." You're going to lose half the audience and you're right. I got emails from one of the guys that was already doing very well on [inaudible 00:21:02] and sent me messages that said, "I never thought of this. This was genius, I'm glad that you showed me this." He was one of the people quite frankly that I was worried about.

Fred Gleeck:
It was the mobile thing right?

Lance Tamashiro:
No, no.

Fred Gleeck:
Something else.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, something else.

Fred Gleeck:
For those of you listening, this is a little bit of inside baseball. The other thing Lance, this is the reason why in college, remember if you ... For those of you who went to college which now turns out to be a waste of time, but the whole idea is that they have prerequisites and unless you have 101 economics you can't take 301 economics because they demand that you do the other stuff first. It makes sense.

Lance Tamashiro:
Right. Yeah, I mean it totally makes sense and I think that you'll be fine. I think that's the way you have to look at any training course is you got to get everybody on the same page. The people that aren't there are going to love it because nobody's ever got them caught up in anything. The people that already know it are going to love it because it reinforces but also it's going to ... They're going to pick something up because you're inevitably going to do something different.

Fred Gleeck:
You know, I want to bring something up that's really important that we can share with everybody that is, I think, a concept that everybody should understand as well. You and I, it was Bill and I are involved in a business, you and Robert are in the business and we came to you and last night we generated well over forty thousand dollars on this training of which our GO is a fifty fifty split. Somebody might say to me, "My god, you're giving them fifty percent." I'm going, "Absolutely." Let me explain to people why I love this arrangement. First off from years and years ago, as I think I told you, I was one of the first people who had a private license with one shopping cart mine is webmarketingmagic.com, feel free to go there and sign up because if not, web.com makes all the money. Sign up with me because we don't want to give the quote mother company the ... If you do that ...

Here's the deal, I've told you that over the years I've made a lot of money with that piece of software and it was always based on splitting the revenue fifty fifty with them because they handled all the technical side and all the customer service side. I'm telling people that are listening to this podcast you should generously and repeatedly give away fifty percent to not have to handle the technical side and not have to handle the customer service side. My question to you is, you're getting paid the fifty percent to handle those two things, do you still think this is a good deal for you and why?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, I mean we look at everything. I mean most of our products we give a hundred percent commissions because we don't have to do the marketing and we know that we'll convert the buyer later. We give fifty percent on most everything else. Our whole philosophy with the affiliate stuff or splitting revenue is they're sales that we would have not made otherwise. I mean for me to go out and do advertising and figure out ad words, and generate new traffic ... The reason it's a win win is one side has traffic, one side has expertise, big deal if you got traffic and buyers if you have nothing to sell them. On the other hand, if you got something to teach but no traffic, you're both stuck. To us, it's always like any extra sale is a good sale. The one thing that's a little bit awkward for us in this particular one is we're not in this niche. This isn't our niche, it doesn't necessarily help us to be in this other than we have a system that for us to teach it again, it's really just show up and teach it.

Fred Gleeck:
The other thing is this Lance that's interesting is that I have always had a philosophy ever since I started doing internet/information marketing which I started in the mid 90's and transitioned from doing it offline, is that I look for and delight in finding obscure niches that are big enough to be profitable but not like ... When somebody tells me they're in the weight loss niche or the dating niche I'm like, "My god, that's so crowded and so competitive. I want to be doing stuff with doors, I want to be doing stuff with voice over." Now voice overs is starting to get crowded because ... By the way, here's another example of something, people need to listen to this.

We own veosuccessformula.com, so somebody went there, I don't know how long ago, registered veosuccess.com. Went I sent that to Bill to take a look at he goes, "Never heard of this guy." Some guy is trying to poach some of our customers with a very limited amount of knowledge or experience. Be careful when you start to register or create training, registering domain names, try and get some misspellings, do all that stuff. Have you that experience yourself where people are trying to knock you off?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, we have a lot of people with that and there is a legal basis to go after them and get the thing. It's based around confusion in the marketplace. There's a product called Wishlist Member, you're not a lot to create a domain that's called Wishlist Members. They can, if they go to the domain registrar, the domain registrar will give you the domain because it's intentionally done to create confusion in the marketplace.

Fred Gleeck:
I've got a really big question for you then. Ten, twelve years ago, this guy who had attended one of my seminars in the early 90's, comes to one of my seminars and then emails me a few weeks later and says, "Oh by the way, if you let me come to all your events for free for the rest of my life I will give you back gleeck.com," which he registered. Do I have a case against him?

Lance Tamashiro:
Not unless he is siphoning your stuff. He can have gleek.com and use it for something totally non-related. As soon as he starts selling something related, then you have a case. I can have a domain, if I had ... As long as you're not ... That's the squatting law, right, because it's basically extortion in the stuff.

Fred Gleeck:
That's what I thought.

Lance Tamashiro:
As long as you're not squatting for the purpose of I'm going to set this up so that he has to come buy if from me so I put a bunch of bad stuff about Fred Gleeck on it. But if he's using it for something totally unrelated you have no case.

Fred Gleeck:
Good, well that's important that people know because I was concerned and in fact ... Yeah, so in other words the only time you really have a case is if somebody is trying to use your name to confuse people in the marketplace to buy something similar or related?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, yeah. I mean, we have a course called WebinarCrusher.com and we've had people set up Webinarcrusher.biz, webinarcrusher.net and they go try to sell it on other marketplaces knowing that the market knows our product trying to sell it under the same thing.

Fred Gleeck:
The best [inaudible 00:28:04] I ever heard, and you'll like this because this name may have been before your time. Do you know who Johnathon Mizel is?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes, sure.

Fred Gleeck:
Okay. Johnathon Mizel, I knew from literally the mid 90's right? A buddy of mine who actually sold Tony Robins the domain personalpower.com, I won't tell you for how much because I don't think he got paid enough. When Johnathon Mizel was told that this guy owned Johnathonmizel.com or think that was it, he said, "Well, you know, now that I know you I feel kind of bad." He goes, Johnathon goes, "Oh don't worry about it. Just set yourself as an affiliate and sell my stuff."

Lance Tamashiro:
Then that's fine too.

Fred Gleeck:
I thought that was great. What an answer as opposed to, "That's mine give it back to me." He was like, "Oh no problem, just use an affiliate and start making money."

Lance Tamashiro:
At the end of the day, what I do is when there's a domain I want and I don't want to go through the fight for it, you can go to whois.com see when it's going to lapse, just stick it on your calander. I just stick it on my Google calendar and check. Nine times out of ten they it lapse and you just pick it up and act like it never happened.

Fred Gleeck:
Perfect, well that's a lot of information we've covered today for people. Again we'll see you I guess next week same time same channel right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Same time, same channel. Thank you everybody for listening. Make sure you guys go and rate and review us on Itunes, we are currently number twenty in the business and marketing category and it would be awesome if you guys pushed us to number one. Thanks a lot and have a great day.

Read more...

Product Launch: Soft Launch & Filling The Gaps In The Market With Fred Gleeck

“Fred

Fred

Hey, this week it's been all about, actually, it's all been about you and us, really. People should know that are listening to the podcast that Lance, as we've told you in the past, Lance and I discovered each other via my client, Bill DeWees, who's a voiceover artist. One of the things that we're collaborating on is the creation of some tools that can be used by voiceover folks and I thought that rather than talk about this offline, we would actually talk about it online and let people listening to the podcast sort of glean from what it is we're doing.

Here's the interesting thing is we've got a core group of over 11,000 people who are on YouTube on Bill's YouTube channel that are voiceover artists. As we have created some of this material, it's become very obvious that many of these people really need and want a professional website like Bill DeWees has.

Finding a Gap

One of the things that we're doing is creating some tools for these voiceover artists. Among them is sort of a templated, pre-done website. What I've been doing is, with the recent launch of the membership site for Bill, which we know have, I think, about 160 people in there.

I've been teasing the fact that if you're thinking about a website, don't do anything yet. What we've decided to do is what we call a "soft launch". Because we're dealing with technology, this is how we do it. Why don't you explain to people what a soft launch is?

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

The first thing is that I think that the real important part about this case study and even us talking about it for people is that the whole idea of how we came about this was we saw a need. This isn't a niche that I'm in. This isn't even a niche I know anything about. The voiceover thing I know because of the Fiverr stuff, but I'm not good. I'm not a big name or anything.

One thing that I noticed was I started taking classes in voiceover and Bill DeWees says, "You need to have a website. Doesn't have to be an expensive website, doesn't have to be a fancy website, but it has to be a website that has XYZ information." I go, "Well, I need to have this to do voiceover. Fine. I'll go do it." I know how to make websites, but I go and look at his and I'm like, "I don't know how to make that type of website necessarily." I click at the bottom and I see that I can have somebody make a one-page website for $2,500.

That's a lot of money and the first thing my brain said was, "For $2,500, I could have these guys make me this website or I could hire a programmer to make me a template for this website." Same cost. I could probably get a programmer to do it for cheaper, honestly.

I go to a programmer, happened to work with one, and say, "How hard would it be to make a template for this?" "Oh, not a problem. I can just do that."

Get THAT Made!

I think the point is that there's all kinds of niches where people need stuff and we don't even realize it. Whether it's marketing, websites, tools, whatever. To be honest, in the voiceover niche they don't want to worry about their damn website.

They're told that they need to have one, which they do, but they want to focus on their equipment, their skill, their craft. They could probably all go figure out how to program and make one, but that's not the point.

Phase Out Your Product Launch

What we're doing with it is we've come up with a system to deliver it, to have it all made for everybody, to keep it simple and rather than roll it out to the public we're going to phase it out. We do this with our software, we do this with our websites. What you do is you get a group of people that you know are going to buy it and here's the thing.

You want to get basically beta testers. Beta testers, testimonials, and honestly, we don't have all the features ready. We don't even know what the features are. Why anticipate what the features should be when they'll tell you? You get a group of people, you put out a limited number so you know you're going to sell them out. Those people get in at a cheaper price, they get to test and make sure the system works before you get a bunch of people in there.

they get to give feedback about what it should or shouldn't have or what's working or what's not working. For that discount or whatever that special offer is, they're a little more flexible. They understand there's going to be some more hiccups. They get to be a part of the development process.

The Launch

“Fred

Fred

We will probably going to end up selling this at around just under $1,000, but we want to get 20 people who are in the membership site and sort of give them the advanced opportunity to be one of the first 20 people. I'm pretty sure that we'll get all 20 from the membership. I'd be shocked if we don't.

I've told the group that there will be an announcement on Monday.  Monday will be the opportunity for them to get this thing at 50% off and only 20. The idea being that we get the 20 people. They go through their paces, etc, etc. In doing that, that "soft launch," it allows us to get some people who get excited about the product.

They're excited about the price that they're getting. They're willing to give us feedback.

One of the things that I always like to say to people is, "Hey, we're dealing with technology here, so please understand things may not go perfectly. Please be understanding of that." That's key because every time I launch something that has to do with technology, I always end up remembering that after the fact.

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

Yes. Technology stuff is the hardest thing to launch. It's definitely one of those things that if you can come up with something else, it's better to not be in the technology segment. Just happens to be where I landed.

Guerilla Marketing Pre-Launch

I think that a lot of people go about this wrong. Especially on Facebook and in these private groups. There's a private group for the members that this is going to be launched to. I happen to be a member of it as well.

Here's what I did. I happened to check the group out and I saw that people had been asking about the websites and I saw you teasing it, which is an awesome lesson for people. If you've got a group and people are asking for something and you've got something coming that's a great thing to do.

Then what I thought was, "Well, nobody knows who Lance is. That could be a problem when this launches." What I do? I'm like, "Well, shoot." The stars kind of aligned for me because something happened for me in the voiceover world that sort of was related to what they were talking about. It doesn't matter if something serendipitously happened to you or not. I went in and just said, "Here's a tactic that you can use and here's how you do it."

To be honest, I was shocked. I didn't know that anybody cared. I figured everybody knew that tip. What's second-nature or obvious to you is never obvious to other people.

“Fred

Fred

The interesting thing is that as Lance was doing this he was basically setting himself up for the future when he's giving people this great tip and they go, "Wow, that's an idea I haven't thought of before." Now when I come back and say, "By-the-way, the guy who's launching this thing that's going to be for the first 20 people, you've heard from him. He's actually in the group. It's Lance," they'll go, "Oh yeah. That was the guy who gave that great idea about the ID3 tags." I don't know exactly what it is myself.

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

Yeah. It kind of just happened to work out. I didn't know if people knew about this tip or not. I put it in there with what happened to me. All of a sudden, it was crazy. I'm like, "Wow, I wish people would be that happy when I post pictures of my dog and me." People started responding.

Two Things Happened

The first was people said, "I don't know what you're talking about. Can you give me more information?"

The second thing was people said, "I know what you're talking about. Can you show me how to do it?"

Big Opportunity!

The first thing I did was I went to YouTube and I did a search for exactly what I talked about and a million results came up. I picked the first one and I'm like, "I'm just going to go post this, then I don't have to make a video." I'm actually in there with it ready to post, I'm about to hit the button and I go, "Wait a minute. If I do that, then they're going to go follow this other guy and they're going to get his information."

Then what I did was I said, "If you wait until tomorrow, I'll make you a video." Then I just got on my computer, that's what I do. I just captured the screen, made a quick video, and now all of a sudden it's personalized. It was for them. They understood it was for them.

This is how you market yourself and it doesn't mean you've got this evil genius plan, it just means giving value is what really separates you as a marketer.

Facebook Groups

“Fred

Fred

Yeah, and more generally then, I think for a podcast listener, is this brings up a few different points.

Number one, and you're not a big fan of this, but other people use it effectively. We're using it. I'm not really sure of the effectiveness yet, but having Facebook groups that are restricted based on a membership site provides people with an additional place to get together. All of our members now, over 150 people, are in there introducing themselves and talking

Then, as you're in there talking about something that is of value to them and we're setting you up to then give people the release of this website product that they will then get excited about, it brings up a few things.

Facebook group may be a good idea. If not, there is also other things like other kinds of forum software that you can use, correct?

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

Yeah. I mean, there's forums, groups. I'm kind of coming around on all of this stuff. It was eye-opening to me to see the response. Quite honestly, I didn't know things were happening on Facebook like that.

The part that I don't like about having a group on Facebook that is tied to something paid is technically it's against the terms of service. Okay, big deal, but what always scares me is if it gets shut down, you lose all of that stuff.

I'm always afraid to sell something or add something in where I don't have control of it. Just to lose the content would be disastrous.

Missing A Launch Deadline?!

“Fred

Fred

Let's take this a little bit further, you're working on creating this piece of software that's going to be a plug-and-play website system specifically for voiceover artists that we're going to try and launch, hopefully on Monday.

It's going to sound kind of cheesy if I go back on Monday and go, "Folks, it's not quite ready yet." It will really sound like I'm teasing them. What do you suggest? I understand technology can't always work as you want it to in the time frame you want, but if it isn't ready on Monday, what do I say and how do I justify it?

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

The way that I would approach it is say, "I know I've been telling you about this. We've got an extra-special discount because I have mud on my face." Then we work that out. If you get caught in that position, I think the first thing is try not to promise. Obviously unforeseen things happen.

“Fred

Fred

The reason why I said Monday, by-the-way, is you told me Friday, so I added a weekend.

 

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

Exactly. That's what I was going to say is give yourself some time because you always look good if you come out before you said. You look bad if you come out after. If it happens, own it and then add something. Yeah, it's going to turn off some people, but the truth is most people get it.

I think that's what happens with too many marketers in every niche is they get this ego thing about themselves that they're supposed to be perfect and that the people that follow them think they're perfect and the truth is you relate a heck of a lot more when you're not perfect. None of us are. Be that.

Premeditated Launch? I HOPE So!

“Fred

Fred

My only concern is that they might think that this was a thought-about-in-advance tactic.

 

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

Yeah. I mean they're allowed to think whatever. I think at the end of the day if you have a service that's valuable and here's the other thing we've been talking about as we have been leading up and building this is we know what the market is.

 

The Market Left A Huge Gap

This is a strategy that we have used throughout our entire career.

We've got Backup Creator, which does backups and cloning of WordPress sites. We weren't the first backup software. When we decided to do that what we did was we went and looked at the market and we said, "There's four other competitors on the market. Every single one of them sells at $197 or $297 with a recurring fee on top of it. There's a huge gap in the market."

What did we know about those people? They can't lower their price.

They can't lower their price because they've got too many customers. We knew they had too many customers, so what we did was we said, "We're going to undercut them.

We're going to come in at a lower price with a better product. We're going to incorporate all of the things that they don't have into our product."

We've done the same thing with the websites, right? We went and looked at it. They're charging $2,500. Everybody's charging $2,500 for this simple website. It has a flaw. The flaw is it's missing a vital piece that is needed in it. What did we do? We'll just add that piece in and charge less.

Now all of a sudden, they can't compete with us and we know there's a market. No matter what market you're in this is a strategy you should be looking at as far as to gain a bunch of market. You can always raise your price later. You can never lower it.

Travel Scrooge

“Fred

Fred

Let's switch gears for a second and talk about another one of my clients and I think that this will really help people listening, Tony, who is Travel Scrooge, and he's the guy who shows people how to travel in champagne fashion on a beer budget. He's tagline is, "Bah humbug to overpriced travel." He's got a little thing that I suggested he do on YouTube called, "The Daily Travel Minute".

Tony, he's one of my clients, and we're helping him to create this. I think I said last time we talked that here's a guy that I met with, this June it will be two years ago. He had all these great intentions of doing things right away and he's now finally getting around to it and I give him a lot of credit for sticking with it.

Tony is now creating this program and one of the things that you talked about last time with me is travel is such a broad area. If you're listening and you have a broad niche like you have weight loss or income building, something big like that, you have to kind of small it down.

Lance and I were talking and one of the things we talked about is, he's got a buddy who lives next door who goes to Disneyland more often than he should and he always goes to these sites that show him how to finagle around Disneyland so he can get in there and get everything done real quick. I said, "I thought, what do you know a lot about?" Then I thought, "Wait a second. I don't even need to ask that question because he's been talking to me repeatedly about meeting him with my family in Cancun because he knows this guy at the hotel." I said, "Look, there's a ton of people that go to Cancun every year. Why don't we create a program specifically for people going to Cancun?"

Now my question to you is, okay, so the first thing I told him, though, "Tony, we can't really sell the Cancun program until we build a decent-sized list." Let's talk about putting the cart before the horse and what should he do? List building first? Individual product, Cancun first? What do we do?

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

A couple of things. The first thing is I was actually checking out his site and I was impressed because with no followers, just starting to put up videos cold, there is views. He's already getting views which means a couple of things. Either he's promoting it somewhere or he's getting found in the search, which is even better. That was the first thing I looked at and saw.

Paid YouTube Channels

The second thing, which is down the road, that you guys should look into is something I've only seen one other person do and I subscribed to it just to see it is that you can now have paid channels on YouTube.

He was basically teaching how to do stuff in Adobe Edition. It was free for years. He built this huge following. All of a sudden what he did was I got this notice and he's like, "Oh, for the real stuff it's over in this thing and it's $3 a month." I signed up. It was a seven-day trial. I've now been in it for three months. Don't know if I've ever even went and looked, but I'm getting dinged for it. Every time I went and looked, he's got a couple hundred people in there.

My thought is, especially with YouTube stuff, is once you build this thing up big enough, you can make a separate paid channel that is tips for each specific thing. You don't have to update it.

Leverage Existing Contacts

Here's what I would sort of be inclined to do because you mentioned he knows the hotels and he knows the people. I would try to work a deal with them in one of two ways.

One, let me put my fliers on your desk about this thing that I do to the people that are already there so that when they leave your hotel, they're still thinking about you. I'm going to promote your hotel. I'm going to promote your services. Let them build the list.

What do you know about those people? They already like that hotel. They already do this.

The second thing would be, "Can you give me a discount to anybody that I send to you?" Now, not only do they like your hotel and you're telling them to come follow me on my YouTube to find out more about stuff that can happen, they also get a discounted rate. Even if it's $10 a night, you know, nothing, for people that he sends them. That way the hotel's building your list for people in Cancun, but also your list of people that like to travel.

“Fred

Fred

Yeah. My thinking, though, in the case of Bill the voiceover guy where we've been going for five-and-a-half years and we now have 11,000 people, the largest following of any of the voiceover artists, I said to Tony, I said, "What we really have to do first, it feels like to me, and maybe you can talk about this in your experience on how you've done this with clients and people that you've worked with, but my first thing is we need to get going with building our list."

That list will include a YouTube channel following list. It will include a Twitter following. It will include a Facebook group, et cetera, et cetera. We want to build our list and we want to build it in different areas because some people are more Facebook people, some people are more YouTube people. Am I right in your eyes of thinking that the first thing that we have to do is get a bunch of people following?

Podcasting Traffic and Exposure

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

Yeah, I think get a bunch of people following him. The other thing that I've been doing, and I know you've probably seen a little bit of this, is my podcast, I decided a couple weeks ago I just want to blow up my podcast.

I want to list on iTunes. I want to be on people's phones . I thought, "I've been sort of dabbling with this podcast thing for years." I mean, my list listens to it, but I'm not getting new people because of it.

This is something he can do as well. I started contacting other people in my niche. This is weird. I didn't know what was going to happen. I just said, "Well, I want to get more exposure, so how do I do that?" I always heard you've got to give stuff so I started contacting other people in my niche I had never heard of and just saying, "Hey, will you come be on my podcast? Will you come be on my podcast?" Everybody said yes and so far everybody's shown up.

Here's the thing that I didn't realize was going to happen. Every one of these people, every one of them after the show said, "Let me know when this is going to go live because I'll send it out to my email list. I'll put it on my Twitter account. I will Facebook it." Every one of them. It's like I'm getting a bunch of benefit.

First of all, easy content. I'm getting more exposure to people that I have never had exposure to and I've been doing this for six years now. I've never been able to walk up to somebody and say, "Hey, will you mail for me?" They're always like, "No, I'm not going to mail for you. I'll mail for my own stuff."

It's About Them

This podcast thing, everybody is like, "I'm ready to mail. I'm ready to send it out to my following," because it's about them. It's about them and it builds my thing.

Even in the last two weeks, I've gone from 37 reviews from iTunes, being nowhere in the searches, to I think this morning I think it was 100 likes and 60 reviews in two weeks from other people promoting my show.

“Fred

Fred

I asked how I could help you as well and you may want to explain to people why our decision was to make this a subset of your podcast as opposed to a separate podcast. Explain that.

 

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

Yeah, I mean well part of it was we were initially going to start this whole, new thing and that was fine, but there was no following. There was not traction. I already had my list and I couldn't fit it, honestly, into my own list promotion to mail that out. I just didn't have a date to say, "By-the-way, here's this other podcast to listen to." It made sense to do that.

On top of it, this other thing that I had just been talking about, these interviews started. I saw where it was going to go and so it was like, we could either do this separate thing or we can leverage the stuff for what we're doing into this same show. It was like rather than split the audience, why not just bring it all together as one?

“Fred

Fred

You know what, after we spoke last time, I want to do a little bit of blatant self-promoting, but the reason why it's worthwhile for people to listen to what I'm about to say is this. Over the past 30 years, I've done well over 2,000 interviews with business professionals. I realized, after we got off the podcast last time, I said, "What is it I'm particularly good at?" I have this document on my computer on the desktop that says, "My Revenue Sources." I keep thinking, "What is it that I'm better at than 99.9% of the people out there?" For years I've had this site, ExpertInterviewer.com.

I have learned how to do that really, really well. Whenever I watch Fox News or any of these different, CNN, whether it's Anderson Cooper moderating a debate, I say to myself, "You know what? I could do that as well." Some people I can't say better than, some people I do, but others I say, "I can do it as well as him or her." I think that there really is something to be said for looking at what you can really do already really, really well. Expert Interviewer is a site that years ago I put together with the famous Terry Dean.

Terry interviewed me back in, what was it? I don't remember when it was. Way back. It talked about that. I'm going to update that site, but I keep coming back to the idea that one of the easiest ways to create content ... I always tell people, people always say information marketers or info product creators. You need to create products. Great. You know what? Even if you're Tony Robbins, sitting and talking into a mic with nobody bouncing ideas off you, frankly I don't care how good you are, is boring.

It's boring to listen to. I like to listen to a little bit of back and forth. You and I go back and forth. If somebody's listening to this in their car, they're kind of like, "What's Lance going to say to that? Oh, that's interesting." There is a back and forth.

I did an interview about five or six years ago with a guy who Al Gore claimed to be. His name is Vinton Cerf. If you look him up on YouTube, he's one of the two people credited with having started the internet. He developed TCP/IP protocol. I interviewed him. It was a weird story on how this happened. I hired a crew. If you go to YouTube and put in, "Fred Gleeck and Vinton Cerf," you'll see something that looks 60 Minutes quality because I hired a professional crew to do this video recording. We'll talk more about that later, but I think that the interview process is so critical to creating info products. What do you think?

I'm Mr. Stupid

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

I agree with you. If it's spoken out, it's so much easier. All of the products we create, they're trainings. For us, it's easier with two of us to do the trainings. One of us is always the lead, the other one's just kind of making sure things were explained correctly or bringing out the part that was wrong. You guys do that as well.

“Fred

Fred

Yeah, and I refer to that as, "I'm Mr. Stupid." I will ask the questions that the person who's listening to the program wants to ask, but is fearful to do so because somebody's going to say, "Oh, that's a dumb question." No. I'll ask them for you.

 

Lance Tamashiro

Lance

You know, 90% of the products are trainings that me and Robert put out. We do them because we don't want to get on a call together and usually it's, "Hey, I figured out how to do this. Let me show you." We're like, "Let's not do it on a call. Let's do it where we're getting paid for it." We do the same thing, the Mr. Stupid. That's how we're able to actually build something real because it's normally based around I want to show Robert something or Robert wants to show me something, so, "Why not just set up your podcast, Lance," or, "Set up your income machine, Robert," or whatever and then it's walking them through the process as if they know nothing.

“Fred

Fred

Think about when I first called you on Skype just now. First thing I said was, "Don't talk about anything. Let's just put it on the podcast." Because those are the ideas that people are looking for, I think. A lot of times, training is great, but people oftentimes want to hear what are you really doing. What is happening behind the scenes?

Tell me, what's really going on with your business? What are you doing right now yourself? I think that's why I told you last time that people, and I forget. One of the big marketers did this where they charged people to take a tour of their office and facilities to see behind the curtain. People were paying them a lot of money to see what they really do everyday.

Resources:

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100 Checks a Month

Fred Gleeck has been around and involved with internet marketing since the very beginning.

Fred was actually the one who gave Yanik Silver his first big break speaking at a seminar in front of a large group of people in 2001. In fact, Fred was doing offline information marketing since 1983.

He suggests that if you can create a tool that appeals to a certain niche of people and that they buy into to become an indispensable part of their business then you have them hooked in. He quotes an example of one tool that he uses that has made him over 1 million dollars! Lance relates how he feels that a big error people make is that they think that software is the only way to create these tools when it can in fact also be a website that performs a task that automates something.

Fred tells us of a real estate seminar where somebody gave him an idea. He went home, spoke to his developer, made the simple website and the very next day walked back into the seminar and related the URL to the gathered crowd and got instant signups - a simple website, the equivalent of software.

Rather then try to make a million dollars in 90 days, Fred suggests why not find enough money to pay a utility bill and automate it every month, then find a way to pay a car payment… etc… So then if you have quite a number of sources of revenue if one goes bust, it doesn’t matter so much as you have many other sources.

Fred shares that his next book is called ‘Don’t Focus’ - which basically explores how we can only focus on one thing at a time, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that we have to focus on one thing for our entire time!

Fred’s business model is based on the fact that he’s an extrovert - he loves being around people. He needed a way to work with people, so he adjusted this business model to concentrating on people in fields who nothing about marketing or information marketing. He also only wants to work with people that he would like to have dinner with on a regular basis!

Lance points out that Fred bases his business model on finding people who are already successful, and the pros of that particular setup. Fred points out the negative side to his methodology is that a lot of people that he works with don’t actually make it.

Fred quotes the example of Travel SCROOGE - a site for budget traveling. The guy who owned the site came to him with no success, but it was really down to the fact that he wasn’t doing anything to help himself. Fred cajoled him into setting up a YouTube channel and getting a daily video up to assist people find a great deal - a one minute tip video, and Lance makes the point that this one minute tip is an ideal length for people to consume short quick information on a daily basis - its not too long , and people always have a minute to spare!

Lance discusses how to micro-niche a niche. He tells how his training doesn’t show a client how to set up a website, it trains a client to use his product to set up a website. 95% of your market is newbies - people forget this.

Fred brings up a great story about a person who was an expert in napkin folding - and how he made the mistake of assuming that nobody would be interested in this - the statistics shocked him. This taught him never to presume he knows everything about what people are actually interested in.

A great tip from Lance about how to increase sales on Fiverr - specifically in the voice over field - is to tell people that you are actually ‘the best’ voice over artist on Fiverr. People search for this, and will find you from this. From this the point that naturally follows is that if you want to be the expert - tell people you are the expert.

Resources

If you have a question, comment, show or guest idea or just want to get in touch with Lance, you can contact him here. He loves to hear from his listeners!

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