Tag - Know Like and Trust

Social Media Marketing, After the Sale, Facebook & Twitter – Fred Gleeck

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Social Media Marketing, After the Sale, Facebook & Twitter

  • Pay attention to your message and what you customers "see" on social media
  • How do you treat your competition on social media? What does that look like?
  • Scarcity - how to use it correctly AND get results
  • Why you need to pay close attention to your back-end marketing!
  • Your "work" starts AFTER the sale. NOT before!
  • Selling live event seats - multiple ways to monetize

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More Money, Traffic & Exposure For Your Business – Jill Lublin

 

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Jill Lublin is a master strategist on how to position your business for more profitability and more visibility in the marketplace.

She is CEO of a strategic consulting firm and has over 20 years experience working with over 100,000 people plus national and international media.

Jill teaches a crash course in Publicity at both live events and live webinars and con-
sults and speaks all over the world.

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Mindset & Relationship Marketing For Success – Demi Karpouzos

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Welcome back to the Lance Tamashiro show, we have a great guest today. Today’s guest is Demi Karpouzos who’s a business mentor, published author and tell-all speaker. She works with entrepreneurs who want nothing more than a full client roaster, who doesn’t, a spacious schedule and a cushy bank account but consistently let fears, doubts and insecurities stop them from putting themselves in the spotlight and making that money.

Demi shows her clients how to acquire new leads and then teaches them how to market to those leads so that they turn them into paying clients. Demi left a 6 figure income job to pursue her desire to become a business owner. After a lot of struggle and frustration, she realized that to build a successful business, all it takes is 3 simple steps. She attributes her 5 year overnight success to mindset and marketing and now she helps entrepreneurs and small business owners get more clients by marrying mindset and marketing. Demi, I’m super glad to have you here.

Demi Karpouzos:
I am so excited to be here Lance, thank you for having me.

Lance Tamashiro:
Okay, so one of the things that I love right off the bat about the way that your bio talks about is that you focus so much on mindset and marketing. One of the things that I noticed, so many people that struggle online, myself included was that, I ignored the mindset stuff, I didn’t really care about that, I thought all I needed to do was learn a system, do it the way that it’s done and then everything would fall into place. I don’t know about your experience but for me, that’s not how it all turned out.

Demi Karpouzos:
No, for me either, I totally relate.

Lance Tamashiro:
Can you tell the story about leaving a 6 figure job because I did the same thing, I climbed the corporate ladder, I was making a comfortable 6 figures and then realized one day like, “This isn’t for me.” Then I thought, “Well, I know how to do business, I know how to do stuff, I know how to succeed.” I started my own business and it didn’t really go as I had planned. I was curious if you could talk about how that happened for you.

Demi Karpouzos:
It sounds like we have had some similar experiences here because I too, I was in a managerial position and I have always known that I’m a free spirit and I tend to do best when I have a lot of spaciousness in my calendar, a lot of flexibility and I don’t do so well in somebody else’s schedule and I really didn’t enjoy having to ask someone else to take vacations. I knew that I needed to make a...

Lance Tamashiro:
Look busy 6 to the 8 hours you are in the office.

Demi Karpouzos:
Exactly. It really came down to … For me, I realized that my … I was absolutely miserable, I was as most people I think … I say most people, a lot of people I knew who were in the corporate world, we all lived for Fridays and dreaded Mondays, we started dreading it come Sunday evening. That became so great that it actually superseded my fear of going out on my own and trying something different. There was actually a co-worker of mine who stopped me one day and she said, “You know what Dem, I really think you should become a counselor or a therapist or something because people keep …”

Our co-workers, at the end of my work day would ask, “Hey Dem, can I chat with you for a little bit?” 2 hours later, I’d find myself finally getting into my car. I knew I didn’t want to go back to school but that something stuck in my head because I did enjoy chatting with people and helping them and went online and discovered the world of coaching and started taking some steps. The same with you I thought, “Easy, I do this naturally, I can make this successful business right from the start,” and didn’t focus on the mindset component and didn’t realize that I had a lot of bad habits when it came to stretching myself, doing things that were unfamiliar to me or putting myself in front of other people, voicing my opinions and there’s all sorts of things going on.

I actually duped myself for the first I would year of my business, it took me that long where I was being busy so I was trying to perfect my business cards and I even made brochures at the time, my website, it was just ridiculous. Everything, putting my ducks in a roast so to speak and not really putting myself out there and trying to get clients. It was a huge flop at the beginning.

Lance Tamashiro:
That’s one of the biggest things that I see going on with a lot of people is they do this whole thing where they think what makes a business is a website and a business plan and cards and telephone numbers and all of these stuff. Those I guess are important but they don’t build the business in the meantime. For me, I did a lot of those same things and I found out that, when I really started looking at myself, they were excuses because I was afraid, what if I fail? If I do all of this busy stuff then I don’t actually have to go out and find a client. I think that so many people that I watch build businesses, they get stuck where they do all the busy stuff and then they get down on themselves because they don’t have the success that they thought they should have.

Then they’re not really willing to take a real look and move to that next level which is, “all right, you’ve spent a year putting your business together, now it’s time to make it a business.”

Demi Karpouzos:
Yes, exactly.

Lance Tamashiro:
When you work with clients and you see people, what does it take, like how do you get them moving from that point of busy work to actually productive business building?

Demi Karpouzos:
Usually when they come to me, they are starting to get a glimpse that it is their bad habits or their mindset that has kept them stagnant or has been depleting their savings or getting themselves in debt. There isn’t a whole lot … They’re open to it which is good and then it’s just a matter of going through, “What are you focusing on, what are you spending your days, what …” I find that typically people have this long to do list or these really lofty goals which are great but they don’t think to make them doable or break them down.

It’s a matter of okay, what have you been doing, what has worked, what hasn’t worked, what are your goals and then how do we put a plan together so that you actually accomplish across these finish lines that you’re setting for yourself. Truth be told, it’s a lot of accountability as well so it’s having and putting a plan in place, asking a lot of questions, putting a plan in place and then making sure that the person is on top of it and I’m not there to be their friend, which is hard … I have been, I think like most people, we want to be liked and that took a lot for me to be okay with them saying some not so nice things or getting frustrated with me or trying to turn it around and say that I’m pushing them too much or whatever the case is.

I realized that I’m there to do a job for them and that’s what it is. They thankfully always like me at the other side of it, during that it can be quite sticky. I empathize because I see myself in them, I’m just a few steps ahead of them so I still need to keep my stuff in check too, I just tend to catch myself a lot quicker now.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, one of the things I have to be real careful of and you mentioned this with the goals is, I used to be a real big goal setter and whatever it is like build this for my business, accomplish X number of dollars for a time. A weird things happens for me where my body … I trick myself while I’m coming up with goals, I actually feel like the goals happen and I get that … I don’t know if you do this but I’ll write down a goal and I’m like, “All right, I would love to build my business up to X dollars per month.” I sit down and I think about it and I make that my goal and my body goes through it, almost as if it’s happened.

My heartbeat goes up a little bit, I get real excited about it, I go research stuff and then when it comes to implementing it, it’s like I can’t ever reach that high again that I was on when I was thinking about the goal. I have to be careful and you mentioned breaking down goals and I think that that’s real important is that, I have to give myself milestones. If my goal is let’s just say $10,000 a month, I have to make a goal that is, “Well, to make $10,000 a month, I’ve got to make $300 today.” If I can make 150 and 200 and then 250 and then 300, I’m moving towards it but when I have those bite sized goals that I see myself actually moving towards the bigger goal but focusing on the smaller one, I find that I accomplish more things than if I focus on the big, overall, we’ll call it the end goal.

Demi Karpouzos:
Yes, thank you for saying that because for me, I too was doing the exact same thing and maybe it’s the entrepreneur thing to do, I’m not sure. I realized what I did was I went to … Here we have Staples, they have all sorts of supplies and I bought a flipchart paper and on it, I wrote the month and then I … I figured, okay, if I wanted to make X amount of dollars, I would need to get 5 clients that month.

Then I’d think, “Okay, well maybe I need to have 20 chats, sales conversations with people in order to close those 5.” I would take post-it notes and I took 20 post it notes, I’d peel them off, I stuck them on this flipchart paper, I put little circles to represent each person and I would look every day and I’d think, “Okay, I have to fill those circles with people and have appointments.” That’s how I was able to break it down instead of just having these random numbers as you said floating around in your head without breaking them down into doable chunks.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love that too because if you know you’re going to get 15 nos before you get 1 yes or 5 yeses or how many you’re going for. A weird thing happens to me mindset wise and I don’t know if you experience this as well but if I get 2 nos, for some reason my mind tells me that everybody, my whole life has told me no and that everybody will tell me no. Then all of a sudden I look back, if I look at QuickBooks or I look at the actual numbers, I go, “Wow, 2 people said no but 100 people said yes.” For some reason, my mind focuses on that negative no.

I love your idea of having the … You’ve got to make 20 sales calls, having 20 post it notes up there because you know you’re going to go through 15, 18 nos to get to those 2 yeses. It’s like all of a sudden you’re like, “Not everybody said no, only 3 people have said no.” it really keeps it in a whole different perspective of what’s actually happening versus that trick that our mind plays on us.

Demi Karpouzos:
Yeah and I’m so like you, my first instinct is like, “This is so hard, everyone’s saying no.” To think that that’s the actual reality of it, no one likes rejection but yet it may also help if somebody keeps their sheet from the month before where you do see that somebody did say yes even if it was 1 out 20 or 1 out of 30. It’s just a matter of doing it and with practice, you get better and just keep taking one step in front of the other and like you said, not thinking that that is the reality to look at, whether it be QuickBooks or however you keep you system and looking to see, is that really the reality of it and more often than not, it’s not at all.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah and it is weird, I think time gets compressed on the internet or as an entrepreneur, you think something’s taking a week and it’s like, “Wow, it’s really only been 2 hours. I’ve been working on this forever and it’s been …” Or it does the opposite, it gets spread out when you think it’s been really short. When people come to you and they’re building a business and they’re getting in the right place, how do you take somebody from where they’re at which is probably not … Their business isn’t growing as much as they want it to be, their mind’s in the wrong place, actually starting to build leads, where should people start looking for that, how do they actually start building up that portfolio?

Demi Karpouzos:
I think because I did a little research on you Lance so I think you’re going to agree with me on this, the first step is to build an email list. This was the Holy Grail for me because I was trying all sorts of things, I took a ton of programs and courses and although the strategies that they were teaching were good, they were ineffective if you didn’t have an audience to implement them on and so that was the key component.

We start off by building an email list and there are a ton of different ways to do that. I really focus in on the individual, I definitely want to stretch them outside of their comfort zone but I don’t want to try to squeeze them into a box that doesn’t fit their personality. I’m not going to put somebody on video from the beginning if they’re an introvert like me, it wouldn’t represent them very well. Whether somebody does post challenges or webinars or workshops, creates some killer ethical bribes or free gifts, whether it be PDFs or whatever the case may be. It could be an interview series, there are just so many ways that … Building relationships organically and letting people know, “Hey, I have X offer, a free offer,” doing that within groups.

You can either do it slowly or you can do it fast and build on steroids which usually are the interview series and tele summits and focus on that and then cultivating a relationship with that audience. These are warm leads that you essentially have access to their inbox.

Lance Tamashiro:
Let’s talk about this because this was something that when I got started, always confused me. This was probably the hardest thing for me to figure out and I think for most marketers that are getting as well is that, you hear people say this thing like build the list, okay, fine, I’ll figure that out. Then they say, “Build this relationship with the people on the list.” The weird thing was, is I was on all kinds of lists and I couldn’t figure out how to build a relationship even though I felt like I had a relationship with all the people that I was on the list with. How do you get people over that, what do they mail, how do they go about building this thing with people?

I think what a lot of people think is, “Well now I have an email list.” 1, they don’t to mail because they don’t want to pitch things but 2, you’ve got to mail to pitch things to make money or business. How do you balance that and build a relationship at the same time?

Demi Karpouzos:
That is the best question because it’s easy to build a list, I shouldn’t say easy but it’s pretty straightforward.

Lance Tamashiro:
It’s the easier part, right?

Demi Karpouzos:
Yeah, exactly. As someone who builds 6,000 people in 2 months, that is uber impressive. The how part of building relationships, what I would recommend is this is … It’s very important that you know what your point of view is on what you do and why you do it and why people need it. For instance, let’s say that my point of view was that every business owner regardless, whether you’re Starbucks or the Mom & Pop shop, everybody should have an email list. My point of view, I could then explain, now you have access to as I said, being in people’s inboxes.

You can share tips and facts and videos, you don’t want to keep bombarding them with offers but it’s a matter of allowing the humanness to merge with the business aspect of it. First and foremost, always be human and I think a lot of people mistake personality with that. Then some people think they have to swear and that’s not it, I know there are a lot of people who are on that path dropping F bombs and what not because they think maybe that’s what they do in their personal life, that that’s how they should come across and I’m not here to judge either way. I think that’s where the mistake is, it’s not your personality, it’s allowing you, as they say your vulnerabilities to come through, to be relatable to your audience so that they know that you understand them.

If they feel that you get them, you get that the weight struggles, the money struggles, the whatever it happens to be that you help with, the problem that you solve, then the automatic thing is, “Well, this person must be able to help me.” Then you start building the trust. It’s marrying the humanness side of you, allowing to show the imperfections and letting people know that, “I struggled with this too,” or whatever the case is and be real with it, don’t make stuff up, I’ve seen people do that too, drives me crazy. Be real with what you’ve been through and don’t just try to say, “Hey, you know what, I lost 200 pounds in a year,” and make it seem like it was a better .

You’re explaining the struggle throughout so people understand, “Okay, I can relate to this person.”

Lance Tamashiro:
I love how you put be human about it, express your humanness because I agree with you, I think that what so many people here when they hear like, “Build a following or do this,” is one thing that you mentioned was, they have to have this personality. They create personas for themselves that may just be an amplification of what they really are or may be something … I know people that have built these personalities that are totally not them at all. What’s crazy about when people do that is I think they’re trying to appeal to everybody but also, now they have to maintain this crazy thing that they’ve created.

I don’t know if you’ve ever had this experience but I’ve got a couple of friends that I’ve known now for years but they’re one way online and I’m like, “Wow, that’s insane.” Then I go and meet them at a conference or then you get to know them and you see them around and all of a sudden it’s like, “You’re not anything like the guy that you portray yourself to be on thing.” I think like, “It’s exhausting.” One thing I always say is, be really careful of the person you create, you may as well just be yourself because it’s a heck of a lot easier, 3, 4, 5, 10 years down the line to just be who you are.

The 2nd thing is that I think that … You hit this on the head is that, I think there’s a disconnect when people go, “Okay, I’ve got this list, now how do I build the relationship with them?” One is be human and share your real story but also you have to remember, how did somebody get on your list? They got on your list because they were interested in how you lost 200 pounds, they’re interested in how you built your business. You almost owe it to them to send them an email with that information. If nothing else, you need to be sending them stuff that is like how did you get there, what was your journey, what can they do to duplicate it.

By doing that, you automatically … It becomes natural to throw a link in, even if you just put it in the footer ad and you don’t say anything about it, have it there. You owe it to them because that’s why they signed up to your list. I see so many people that build these giant lists and spend all this time and then they won’t email and I’m thinking, “They opted in to your list because they’re interested in what you have to say.”

Demi Karpouzos:
Exactly and I love that you also mentioned even putting something in the footer. I very often will … You want it mixed up too, sorry, to answer your question before. You’ll send them a story, a motivational, inspirational story whether it’s of yourself or a client that you’ve worked with or somebody that you know. You can also of course make offers which is always great, you want to have some sort of call to action. Even when I’m not promoting anything, I just want to keep them engaged and I want them to know that, “Hey, there is a human on the other side of this email.” I’ll share a story and say, “Does this resonate with your … If you went through something similar, I’d love to hear about it, just hit reply and let me know.”

Sure enough, you start getting those emails and you start corresponding, of course you’re like, “No, I have all these emails to go through.” It’s so worth it because that’s where the relationship starts building. Even if it’s just a, “Hit reply and let me know if this resonates with you,” or, “Can you relate to this,” or, “I’m I here on my own,” or whatever. People start corresponding back and forth so it’s really nice.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love the strategy of just telling people like … You have to say it, I think that’s the other weird thing is like, if you want somebody to reply, you have to explicitly say in the email, “Hit reply and tell me blah, blah, blah.” If you imply it, they won’t but if you do, they will. I had the same experience, it was the most bizarre thing when people started replying because I asked them to and I’m like, “Whoa, people really are reading my stuff.” Now it’s a point where I have to let them know like I’m not going to probably reply, I might. It accomplishes 2 things; 1, you as the email marketer get to know somebody’s out there. 2, it whitelists you in their email inbox when people reply to you.

I did the same thing, when I got started, one of the things that I did that I think really helped me build that relationship with my list was when people … When I got a bunch of replies back, I would load up Camtasia Recorder which is just a screen capture program and I would just open up my email and I would go through and I would just answer and record each person’s email. They would see me opening up their email and I’m not a big typer but in 5 minutes I can say a lot to them about their side or whatever. I would just open it up, read their email out and then reply to them with a video.

I even had a domain that was personal reply for. I would do this coding thing where I would have their name at the end of the URL. It’s amazing like if you do these things which would take no time at all, just sit down, record, send out the video to them, man, you can build that relationship super-fast and you’re not even doing any sales. A weird thing happens, people start asking you what they can buy from you.

Demi Karpouzos:
That is a brilliant tip, I love that.

Lance Tamashiro:
It’s just one of those little things that’s a little bit different than what other people are willing to do. I think that’s a big thing too, just the mindset stuff is, what are you willing to do that nobody else is? Everybody is willing to put up a web page, everybody is willing to send an email. If everybody is doing that, you’ve got to do better to crash them is sort of the way that I look at it.

Demi Karpouzos:
I couldn’t agree with you more and a video is so personal, I use something called … No, I do have the screen cast and I know there is also Camtasia as you mentioned. If I’m sending something on one on one basis, where I’m not going to be screen sharing, I use something called eyejot, it’s E-Y-E, like your eyeball, eyejot.com. It allows you to shoot a video and I’ve sent these videos, whether it’s to a colleague or whatever, just to say happy birthday or to thank them for something. People are always so appreciative and amazed and they just … You make them feel special as we should, we all like to feel special, just by doing that video.

I love the fact that you would take the time to do that to answer their question. Even more brilliant is the fact that you circumvented the, “Hey, I don’t want to be typing this email but it’s good to talk, that’s a lot easier for me.” You found a way that worked for you and serve them and wow them as well. It’s amazing.

Lance Tamashiro:
Okay so when somebody gets that, where do you find … If somebody’s got a … They’ve built their list, they’ve gotten over that fear of sending an email, they’ve got a product or service to sell, where do you find people tripping up themselves the most along that process, once they’ve got everything in place?

Demi Karpouzos:
Prior to selling, they’re tripping themselves up on the selling process, is that what?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, once they’ve got a list going that’s built, they’re doing the right things on the relationship, they’ve got something that they can sell, where is their big hang-up after those 3 things are in place?

Demi Karpouzos:
I find it’s not positioning so … I am stealing this quote, I can’t remember who said it but, “selling the plane instead of Paris.” When they’re putting it together, when they’re writing their copy or they’re speaking about it, they’re not really tapping into it from their audience perspective because we’d temporarily get very excited about our, what we’ve created.

Although on the one hand we do get excited but on the other hand, we also start questioning, “Are people going to hate it, is this garbage, what’s going to happen?” I think there’s also that but let’s stick with the people who are super excited. They are then focusing on trying to sell them all the bells and whistles without really explaining why it would be good for that person by painting the picture of what the person’s current reality looks like and what it may be like after implementing this product or program or service. On the other side as I had mentioned, I find people also get tripped up because all of a sudden they start doubting so energetically, there’s some sort of weird thing going. They start stalling and delaying or they start doing things in a haphazard way or doing things in a very scale instead of putting all full force ahead, they start holding back.

They don’t want to invest then in promoting their product or their service. I think it’s in the languaging and then also being willing to put it out in a big bold way. They want to start tippy toeing and as you had mentioned before with the sales process, if you get some nos, you think everybody’s saying no, everybody’s always said no. if they don’t start seeing results right away, they immediately blame it on, “This isn’t the right time or this isn’t a good offer or I have to lower the price.” That’s always a big one too, “It’s too expensive or I have to throw everything at it in terms of …” You have an eBook and all of a sudden you’re also offering something that is $2000 because you think that asking $50 for an eBook is too much so trying to overcompensate.

It’s always mindset stuff when it comes up to actually birthing or promoting your product or service.

Lance Tamashiro:
One of the things that I love about all of this and my experience was that my biggest hurdles always came from just having a coach, all of the time having some kind of mentor, some kind of coach that had done where I wanted to get. A lot of times, I don’t even know that they need to have done what you want to do but having that outside sort of eyeball to look at what’s going on and to keep you on track and to keep you like you mentioned accountable, a lot of times … Even just to a sanity check like, “Is what I’m … Does it make sense in the scheme of what I told you I’m trying to accomplish?”

I think that that’s … Having some kind of mentor, some kind of coach for whatever stage your business is at. Even the biggest names in the world are part of mastermind groups and have coaches and all of this stuff. It’s because I think we get too close to ourselves and we let our fears overtake us and stop us from doing things. I’ve done all of the things that you mentioned. If somebody is listening to this right now that’s like, “You know what, I love her approach to building a business, I’m struggling with some of these type of stuff.” Where can people find out more about what you do, find out more about the message that you’ve got or even find out more about how to get your help with wherever they’re struggling?

Demi Karpouzos:
They could take a little peek at my website which has everything, I’m in the process or re-branding so don’t look at it too closely. If you wanted to take a look there, it’s at strategicalcoaching.com.

Lance Tamashiro:
Strategicalcoaching.com, all right and we’ll definitely have that link inside of the show notes for everybody. Demi, it’s awesome, thank you so much for taking the time to do this show, I love your message and I think that if more people understood that it’s not just about the strategy, the marketing piece but so much of this is the mindset that … We’d have a lot more successful entrepreneurs out there. Thanks for this message and we really appreciate you taking the time.

Demi Karpouzos:
Thank you so much for having me Lance and for putting together such a killer podcast. I’ve been binge listening so you, me and my dog have been spending a lot of days together.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome, I appreciate that and as always, we appreciate all of you listening to the podcast. If you ever have an idea for a guest or somebody that you’d like to have us on the show, you can always reach us at our website, fill out the form and let us know about them. Make sure that you head over to strategicalcoaching.com, check out Demi, she’s got a lot of great things to say, a lot of things that you probably need to hear and we’ll talk to you on the next episode. Thanks everybody and bye now.

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