Tag - Productivity

Tech Overwhelm, Lead Generation, Social Media Marketing, Video Marketing & Sales – Erin Smilkstein

Smilkstein26935-006

Erin is the author of your Itty Bitty Prospect To Profits Lead Generation book and owner of BizRankPro, an online marketing strategy consultation service.

She runs workshops and webinars for business owners to teach them exactly HOW to do all the things they know they "should" be doing online, but were too afraid to ask.

Erin is known for making highly technical parts of working online into simple, easy to do steps that even the most "offline thinkers" can grasp and accomplish.

She offers guidance and training with video marketing, online lead generation and building passive income streams.

Resources:

BizRankPro

 

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Achieve Your Personal & Business Goals Faster Than You Ever Imagined – Lorenzo Sellers

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Lorenzo Sellers is a #1 Bestselling Author, the #1 Success Strategist in America, and the Founder and CEO of Next Level Solutions®, an organization specializing in the field of success training and development of individuals and entrepreneurs.

Lorenzo’s goal is to help you achieve. your personal and business goals faster and easier than you ever imagined.

In a short time, Lorenzo Sellers has consulted for more than 50 small businesses and addressed more than 5,000 people in 50 talks, seminars, and workshops throughout the US, Canada, and 4 other countries worldwide. As a keynote speaker and seminar leader, he addresses more than 50,000 people each year.

He has studied, researched, written and spoken for 8 years in the fields of economics, history, business, philosophy and psychology. Lorenzo also studied the fine points of leadership as he served in the US Navy. He is the top selling author of 2 books that have been translated into dozens of languages.

He has written and produced more than 10 audio and video learning programs, including the worldwide, best-selling Million Dollar Mind, which has been translated into more than 10 languages.

He speaks to corporate and public audiences on the subjects of Lifestyle and Professional Development, including the executives and staff of many of America’s largest corporations. His exciting talks and seminars on Leadership, Self-Esteem, Selling, Goals, Strategy, Creativity and Success Psychology bring about immediate changes and long term results.

He has traveled and worked in over 5 countries. He is active in community and national affairs, and is the President of two companies headquartered in San Diego, California.

Resources:

Lorenzo Sellers

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Everything Can Change In A Moment: Embrace Obstacles – Scott Earley

ScottEarley

  • A life-changing event leads to rebirth and success
  • How to stay positive when tragedy strikes
  • What are you taking for granted?
  • You have to set small goals to reach the overall goal
  • Welcome obstacles!
  • Focus on what you have, not what you don't have
  • Built a business - killed a business - rebuilding
  • Getting repeat customers with a free offer
  • You can do whatever you set your mind to through small goals EVERYDAY!

Resources:

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Profitable Growth, Mindset & Productivity – Kelly Roach

KellyRoach

Today's guest is Kelly Roach, who's also the host of one of the top rated podcasts called Unstoppable Success Radio. She's an international best selling author and the CEO of Kelly Roach Coaching. She's a former NFL cheerleader and Fortune 500 executive where she was promoted seven times in eight years. Kelly brings a powerful combination of proven and profitable business growth strategies coupled with the mindset, wellness and productivity practices required to help entrepreneurs build a profitable business around a life they absolutely love.

Kelly, how's it going and welcome to the show.

Kelly Roach:
Hey Lance, going good and thank you so much for having me and for the great introduction. Really appreciate that.

Lance Tamashiro:
Oh, super glad to have you here. All right, first of all, I've got to start at the beginning. How do you go from NFL cheerleader, Fortune 500 executive and then to entrepreneur and coach?

Kelly Roach:
Yeah, absolutely. I always have had a passion for health and wellness and I danced competitively all growing up. I was always a cheerleader. I ended up a a state university. I had to pick the school that was most affordable because I came from a family where we didn't have a lot of money and I wanted to continue to perform. I want to continue to dance, to cheer and to be in a competitive sport and the dance team at the school that I went to wasn't really the best. I didn't feel like I would be challenged and I was looking for an opportunity to continue. I was like, "You know what? I'm going to audition for the Philadelphia Eagles." I did and end of my freshman year of college joined the Philadelphia Eagles cheerleading team, which was awesome. I was a cheerleader and I was on the stunt team. I did the flying as well. It was just an incredible experience. Everything about it, it was a ton of fun and it got me really comfortable.

I was a communications major, so it was awesome because we would talk to the press and we would do a lot of public appearances. We would be interacting with CEOs and obviously top athletes and news reporters and just a variety of different people. It just really helped me to have my first taste of communications and public relations and being in the public.

Then, when I went to start my first full-time career, I just knew I couldn't be stuck at a desk all day. I knew that wasn't my personality. I wanted something where I could be out meeting with people and talking to people and making an impact. I started with a company doing sales and recruiting. I joined the Fortune 500, as you mentioned, because I knew there was a ton of opportunity for upward mobility and really wanted to have the opportunity to get into a leadership role and grow my income and all of that.

I'm trying to run through this as quickly as possible.

Basically got to the point where I was running 17 locations up and down the east coast. As you probably can imagine, Lance, every time I was getting promoted and promoted, it was more and more demanding on my personal life and more and more demanding on my quality of life and energy level and all of that. It got to a point where I was helping this one company make millions of dollars. I was traveling all around and training people and coaching them and doing what I love, which is building business. I just decided that it was really time for me to take that skillset and make a bigger impact in the world, do something that was actually going to help a lot of people and that's how I got started coaching entrepreneurs and helping entrepreneurs make six and seven figure leaps in their business. That is how I landed starting my own coaching and consulting company.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love it and I love the whole story. All right, so no response needed. I don't want to date myself or yourself, but I'm a Las Vegas kid. I grew up watching the Eagles with Randall Cunningham being a full-blown fan of theirs, so that's cool that you were from there.

One of the things that you mentioned was that you came from a family without money and made you do some things, put you in some positions and then you followed these goals. I was curious how coming from a background without having access to a lot of money, how that changed your world view on business or motivated you or whatever because I hear this a lot with entrepreneurs. Not necessarily that they came from families without money, but that they don't have enough money to pursue their dreams.

Kelly Roach:
Yeah. It's crazy, right, because I think that actually not coming from money is the greatest advantage that I've been given in life. Really to be honest with you, Lance, I think it's why I've been so successful. It's why I've been so drive. I learned very early on in my life that if I took what life handed me or I could maybe flip that around and say if I accepted only what my parents could afford, right, that my life would be extremely constrained and limited and I would be getting no a lot of time. I didn't like getting no for an answer. I very quickly learned that if I wanted to turn all of the nos that I was getting in life into yeses, that I was the person that was capable of doing that. That is what's driven me since a very young age is realizing that I have the power to change my circumstances. It's me in the driver's seat and if it's going to be a certain way, it's because I either chose to do the work to create the outcome I wanted or I chose not to and, therefore, I had to accept what was given to me.

Lance Tamashiro:
You know, it's really interesting. I love that you say it was your greatest advantage. I had a very influential person in my life that was helping me through some times and one of the things that he said to me that really changed my whole abundance, scarcity mindset was he said, "I would much rather work with somebody who doesn't have access to money and resources than somebody who does have access to money and resources because the people" ... Sorry, because he would rather work with people because they understand that money and resources doesn't buy them happiness or success.

Kelly Roach:
It's so true.

Lance Tamashiro:
The people without it, they're at that advantage and so his job was always to get them to understand that that's not the goal that you have in mind. One of the things that you talked about was that as you got promoted and you were having all of these things and moving up the corporate ladder, and I was given raises and given promotions and all that, and they always come like this, "We're going to give you this new responsibility, this new title. It's going to be less work and more money for you. You're going to love it." That's the biggest lie that they tell you in corporate America as they're moving you up, but you found that it was so demanding on your personal life. What I want to talk about is how that success and moving up, when did you come to the realization that it was your happiness or this success and the way that it was and then you figured out that you could have both success and happiness at the same time?

Kelly Roach:
Yeah, absolutely. I talk about this a lot in my new book Unstoppable that just came out earlier this year and I talk about the fact that the mistake that I made was compromising a lot of my happiness in order to achieve success when reality you can have happiness, success and fulfillment, but it comes with a lot of sacrifice and it has to be done intentionally and by design. Yeah, absolutely for me, it was done over a period of months and a few short years. Not a long time but a few years that I started to realize whoa, if I keep going like this, yeah, I'll be at the top of an organization and, yeah, I can make a lot of money, but I'm going to be totally unfulfilled and completely unhappy because I've no time to live life and enjoy the success that I'm creating. I really got to the point where it was compromising my health and my wellness and as I already shared, that's a huge passion of mine.

It just came down, Lance, to me evaluating what my value system was and really determining what my top values were which were abundance, freedom, fulfillment. Those are really my top three values as far as what I want my life to look like and I realized that the only way I could achieve all three of those together was in starting my own business.

It wasn't a negative towards my past experiences. It was just hey, if I want to have all three of these things in my life, I'm going to have to go out and create it, not rely on a job to try and give that to me or create that for me.

Lance Tamashiro:
In your business, I'm really curious, most of your clients when they come to you, are they people that are struggling and trying to build something or are they people that are semi-successful but just not getting the results that they want?

Kelly Roach:
Yeah, that's a great questions. I have different programs that I run in my business and I work with business owners from startup through multi-million dollar companies. Some of the my clients, already in the multi-millions when they hire me, and they just want to up their game. They want to increase their sales, they want to accelerate growth and they really want an outside in look on where are the money leaks, what can they do to close some of the loopholes and accelerate the engagement of their team, the performance of everyone in the company and their strategy around doing so. On the flip side, I have a lot of people come to me that are in that zero to 100K phase that really need help putting systems in place. They need strategy. They need to learn some of the necessary business skillsets and mindset that's actually needed to become a successful entrepreneur. I really deal with people along the entire spectrum.

Lance Tamashiro:
Between those two groups, the startups or the zero to 100K and then the 100K up that are trying to up their game, what do you see as ... Is there something in common that they both have that's holding them back or is there something that the 100K, million dollar plus companies have that the startups don't that are maybe holding them back?

Kelly Roach:
Yeah, definitely. My most successful clients, multi six and seven figure business owners and even eight figure business owners, they are essentially moving with great speed and taking a lot of imperfect action really, really quickly. What I always tell people, Lance, is that the number one entrepreneurial skillset is your ability to tolerate an immense amount of imperfect action. It's the ability to keep moving, make mistakes, have things not be exactly perfect, build the plane while it's flying. It's all about speed, aggressive, strategy and putting one foot in front of the other.

A lot of time what I see with the business owners that stay stuck or struggle or really can't make it to the 100K mark is, one, the lack of imperfect action and what I mean by that is they keep themselves really busy and they're working really hard, but not necessarily on the right things that are actually going to make them money. My programs, obviously, are all about teaching people how to use their time, what to spend their time on and then how to develop the skills to be effective in those areas of their business, but it really does come down to the imperfection action, the speed and aggressiveness and then the thoughtfulness of the strategy. What I mean by that is connecting the dots between how you're spending your time and how closely that correlates with what you want to see in your bank account.

Lance Tamashiro:
All right, so maybe this is called, I hope I'm not putting you on the spot, but maybe this is the six figure question and that's this. If I'm stuck and I can't get my business going and I don't know what I'm doing, how can I identify that maybe I'm spending the right amount of time of the wrong stuff or spinning my wheels or trying to be too perfect? First of all, identifying that I might even need something like a coach to help me move past that? How does somebody even come to that realization?

Kelly Roach:
Yeah, absolutely. Let's start with the coach question. If you've been stuck at the same point for three months, six months, nine months and your income isn't growing and you're not accelerating the amount of new clients that are coming into your business every single month, there's an issue and you need a coach and you need someone that is going to push you, get you out of your comfort zone and actually get you spending time on the right things.

Now, going back to how do you figure out what's keeping you stuck or how do you identify why you're not growing, I always start with this. Looking at the amount of time that you're investing in your business and asking yourself is 80% of your time being dedicated to generating clients because when you're under the 100K mark in your business, you're essentially in cash flow mode. That means that 80% of your time should be focused on outward facing activities that are going to net you clients, business, growth, profit. Instead of focusing on very long range goals, you need to be more focused on short range goals so that you then use that short range cash flow that you build up to then use that as a diving board to be able to spring up and add staff, get resources, invest in advertising, hire up. Do all the things that you're going to need to do then to spring yourself into multi six figures and beyond.

It's things like asking yourself how many consultations are you doing per week on the phone with prospects, how many clients are you adding to your list each week? Are you consistently doing some type of live engagement event, whether it's a webinar or a speaking engagement or a live streaming or any type of event where you have a captive audience and people are really learning from you and engaging with you and building that deep trust with you that's going to tee them up and get them ready to close. I kind of teach it in a three step process, Lance, so I say this. There's three things that you need happening in your business at all times in order to create ongoing growth, lead generation, nurture campaigns, and conversion events. There needs to be new people coming into your business and joining your list each week.

There needs to be something happening each week that's taking those people that join your list and engaging them and really building that affinity and trust towards you and with you so that when they're ready to buy, they're going to buy from you. Finally, you need those engagement events which could be a webinar, it could be a live stream, it could be an in person meeting, it could be a phone. It could be any of those things, but it's that opportunity to make a direct offer to your audience in which they're going to raise their hand, say yes, and give you their credit card. Does that makes sense.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah and I love, too, you're one of the first people I've heard explain this the way that you have and that is that difference between, let's just say, six figures. Getting to a 100 grand versus being in a building mode of your business where you're cash flow strapped at six figures. I think that so many people, at least that was my experience, and I think that so many people, we've got this employee mindset where we think, "Oh my gosh, if I could only many six figures, I'd be happy." The truth is when you're working for somebody else, six figures, it's pretty comfortable. You're not paying for health insurance. You're not paying corporate taxes. You're not paying all of this. When you go off on your own and start your own business as an entrepreneur, 100 grand really is pretty uncomfortable.

Kelly Roach:
Yes.

Lance Tamashiro:
It really is. It's cash flow mode and it's cash strapped and every month it's oh my gosh, six figures, it barely keeps the lights on. It barely keeps the servers up. It barely pays the extra for all of the things that go on in running a business and I think so many people miss that because they go, "Well, if I just made 10 grand a month, I'd be happy." There's a difference between making 10 grand and then pulling 10 grand out of your business a month.

Kelly Roach:
Big, big, big difference. Really happy to hear you say that. I completely agree and what I find, Lance, is that with the rise of internet marketing, everyone wants to be a phase beyond the phase that they're actually in. Everybody wants to be doing their long range, the dream business things that they see people who are running multi-million dollar doing and they don't want to pick up the phone and call a client. They don't want to schedule a consult with a prospect. They don't want to go take someone to lunch. They don't want to go do those basic fundamentals which hey, I get it, but you know what? If you're still worrying about how much you're going to be able to pull out of your business at the end of the month and you're not sure if it's going to be able to pay the bills or of if you're saying I can't afford a coach or I can't afford to hire an assistant or I can't afford to do XYZ, then you are in cash flow mode and you should be doing activities to get your cash flow up on a consistent basis so that you can invest in infrastructure so that you actually have a legitimate company so that then you can expand and grow and truly build a freedom based business.

Lance Tamashiro:
Instead of acting like a CEO before you're a CEO. We're all like well, the CEO does nothing. I won't. I love that you said pick up the phone and make a phone call. I think that's a lost art. It doesn't exist and I know when I started my online business, the draw to it was, I'm an introverted person by nature, and the draw to it was well, I'll just put up a website and collect cash. That's awesome. It turned out, I love your three step process with leads, nurturing and conversion, because what I found was the hardest for me was that middle part, the nurturing, the relationship building, the picking up the phone and calling people when they purchased something from me. Those are the things that really changed my business. Of course, the webinars, the podcasts, stuff like that.

What is something that somebody could do in that phases? People's answer is typically they like to live in your first step which is leads, which they can all do that, or they like to live in the third step which is conversion and they'll say, "I've only got 100 people on my list. That's my problem," and you hear the flip, "I've a million people on my list and I can't make them convert." I think that the way you've got it set up, the answer is because you're not doing number two. What can people do, whether they've got 50 people on their list or a million people on their list, to nurture that because I think that's what ... If you get that number two right, it fuels conversion and it also fuels leads.

Kelly Roach:
Yeah, absolutely. Definitely podcasting is huge. Podcasting is the best way to wake your list up and build incredible authority in your field and start converting clients. Absolutely build momentum with not only the people that you've already engaged and have on your list, but certainly attract completely new ones, but you don't even have to become a podcast host. You can become a podcast guest and then start re-purposing those interviews and sharing them with your prospects as a great way to engage them and to demonstrate your credibility, your authority, your knowledge, how you can help them, all of that.

For many years, before I started my own podcast, I did podcast guest appearances and I did exactly that. I used those guest appearances to share them with my audience and to engage people and not only did I get leads and clients from being on other people's shows, but I also was able to further engage my own audience in a really high quality way through sharing those episodes with my list. Definitely being a podcast guest or a podcast host is a huge. Certainly webinars are huge, huge part of my business. I know you already mentioned it's a big part of yours as well. Live streaming now, I tested this out for the first time last week and just jumped on, did a quick 30-minute session. We went back and we took a look at the opt-ins and we had people joining the list immediately just from jumping on and doing a quick, easy 30-minute live streaming session. It costs you nothing. There's no barrier to entry. You don't have to do it a set day or time because you can do it whenever it works for you and you do an educational, quick, 20-minute teaching segment. You invite people to take the next step. You share the free offer and boom, you're building your list. You're engaging people and you're getting them ready for that next step.

What I say, Lance, is if you want to engage your list and you want to nurture your list, it's all about really high quality, free content, but you have to go beyond just sending an email. First of all, no one reads their email anymore and it's just not enough.

Lance Tamashiro:
They're looking for a link.

Kelly Roach:
They're looking for more. They're wanting engagement. They want you. They want the real deal human being. I think the further that we've gotten into the internet age, the more people are demanding a real human being and want engagement with an actual person, if that makes sense.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah and I think that what I love about even these three things that you gave, be a podcast guest if you don't want to be a host, webinars, live stream, is that they take you, meaning you whoever's nurturing your list, zero time to do. A 20-minute podcast takes 20 minutes to do. You don't have to prep. You just show up and start talking.

Kelly Roach:
Exactly.

Lance Tamashiro:
I'm going to let the cat out of the bag. Before this show started, before we started recording, we literally had a 30-second conversation. Hey, how's it going. Are you ready? Okay, let's go. I think the beauty of being a podcast guest is you don't have to build up a podcast and get ranked in iTunes. You've just got to show up and leverage somebody else. You don't have to produce it. All you've got to do is send it out to the people you've got and it builds authority for you, plus gets you access. A webinar takes as long as the webinar is, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, however long you go for. The live stream, I've just started getting into this too, and I think the awesome thing about the live stream is you can do it wherever you're at, whenever you just have an idea.

Kelly Roach:
Yes, yes.

Lance Tamashiro:
I hate writing. I hate doing blog posts. I never have liked them, but what I like about all of these things that you mentioned is it's quick and easy. I'm sitting out on the deck and I'm like, "Oh, here's something cool." You just pop it on, five minutes, you're in and out and people love getting not only the information, but that glimpse into not that person you portray on the internet with your professional photos, for guys they might see you unshaven, they might see you in normal clothes. That's what people are connecting with and I love how you said the further we get into this internet thing, the more that people want real people. It's almost like we've done this whole circle where we went from sales was one on one or in rooms or whatever to this automated thing and now it's selling, that technology's worn off and we've gotten used it is back to the basics of selling which is people getting to know, like and trust you.

Kelly Roach:
Oh yeah, absolutely. My message to everyone listening is these means that we're talking about here have no barrier to entry. You can do them pretty much for free, most of them are free. Some of them, webinar maybe, might have to buy a software, but that's totally up to you. You can use something like Google Hangouts, but the bottom line here, Lance, is anyone can engineer their own celebrity at this point. Anyone, from anywhere in the world, if you have a phone or you have a computer, you can engineer your celebrity. You can become an authority in your niche or field if you're willing to put yourself out there, take imperfect action and just share your knowledge and expertise with the world. Share what it is that you're the best at that can make a difference for people and do it in a compelling way.

I agree with you, I love it. I flipped the camera on last week. I had a t-shirt on. I was like, "This is great." I remember when I first started doing video for my business, I felt like every time I had to put on a full suit and I had to do the hair and the makeup because back then it was a much more formal thing. Now, it's come full circle.

I guess the final thing on that because I'm sure there's other things that you want to cover, but the final thing I'll note there is don't let your desire to come across as perfect or professional or totally polished stand in the way of doing these things because, in fact, that will hinder you more than it will help you. Because people want to work with people that they like or want to be like and they want to be like human beings. They want to hang out with people they feel like that can have a conversation with. Those very things that maybe have been keeping you small and struggling are the very things that you can let go of and they'll actually help you, not hurt you.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love it. Official permission from Kelly Roach to be able to say "Um" or stumble on my words on my podcast and I don't even have to go back and take it out.

Kelly Roach:
There you go, exactly.

Lance Tamashiro:
All right, so the last thing I want to talk about before we wrap this up is I want to talk about this whole idea of productivity and I think that whether people are at day jobs and trying to build something or don't have a day job and are working on something, where do you see people getting hung up on? We all throw around this word productivity and then we all talk about this lifestyle entrepreneurs have and then you look at the way some people run their business, it's like you have a way better lifestyle and life when you had your day job.

Kelly Roach:
Oh so much and I actually talk about this all the time. I'm actually doing a brand new webinar, I'll tell you towards the end and we can talk about it a little bit, but this topic because it makes me, it blows my mind. It blows my mind. Here's the thing. The vast majority of people spend almost all of their time on things that either they shouldn't be doing or don't need to be done at all. Period. The vast majority of most people's working hours in their business are spent on things that either don't need to be done or should be done by someone making $10 an hour. Until you get of the mindset that you are responsible for doing profit producing activities and that you need to push everything else aside in your business and focus first on making sure you can stay in business, essentially. That is your responsibility as a business owner, to make sure you can stay in business, turn a profit, take care of your family and follow through on the commitment that you made to your customers and your clients and all of that.

That's at any stage, whether you're a new business own and it's about getting appointments with prospects or you're an advanced business owner that's focused on retention and peak performance of your staff or hiring to grow your team or list building or building systems and automation. At every stage these things are so equally important. The biggest disconnect I see every single day, Lance, is what people say that they want in terms of outcomes and it's just not correlating with how they're actually spending their time day to day.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes. Absolutely. I love it. I love your message. I love your consistency. I love your energy. I can see how people get great results working with you and being around you. Where can somebody go if they're listening to this and they're like, "Kelly's got this figured out. I need more. I need to hear more of this. I need to know about things like getting more leads, nurturing my list, getting more conversions, being more productive," where can somebody to get more of Kelly Roach?

Kelly Roach:
Yeah, definitely. First thing I want everybody to do is go to automation-secrets.com. It's automation-secrets.com and get the report there that walks you through how to get the top 35 things off of your plate that someone else should be doing for you that you can quickly and easily delegate and it's also going to walk you through the top five things that you can systematize and automate to grow your business more quickly and easily and get yourself out of the weeds and actually into profit product mode. People can go to automation-secrets.com or just text automate report to 442222 to get their hands on that. The other thing is, and you mentioned it already so thank you so much, my podcast, Unstoppable Success Radio. I'm there three times a week. We bring the best quality content and strategies to help people go further faster. I'd love to connect with anyone there.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome. Well, I super appreciate you being here. I think that your message is super important and I still, I love the way that you break down cash flow versus real business mode and I think that if more entrepreneurs started out with that understanding this, I think that's a huge breakthrough that a lot of people never ever consider until they get to six figures and go, "Wow, six figures is really like two figures by the time you're running your business." I really appreciate you breaking it down that way.

Everybody right now should go head over to automation-secrets.com. Pick up the report and figure out what it is that you're doing that you shouldn't be and how to get that taken care of for you. Also, check out Unstoppable Success Radio. You can find that, I'm sure, on iTunes Stitcher, everywhere else. Check out Kelly Roach.

Kelly, I'm super glad that you made it here today. I really appreciate you spending your time and everybody else, thank you for listening and we'll talk to you on the next episode. Thanks and bye now.

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Shift Your Thinking & Achieve Extraordinary Results – Kim Ades

KimAdes

Kim Ades, is the president and founder of Frame of Mind Coaching and JournalEngine Software. She's an author, speaker, entrepreneur, coach and mother of five, probably the hardest job of all of those. Kim is recognized as one of North America's foremost experts on performance through thought mastery. By using her unique process of integrating online journaling in her coaching, Kim helps her highly driven clients to examine and shift their thinking, in order to yield extraordinary results.

Kim, super happy to have you here today. How are you doing?

Kim Ades:
I'm great. I'm super happy to be here.

Lance Tamashiro:
I know. Let's talk about this, because first of all, you're all kinds of things. I think that a lot of times when people are trying to get going online, trying to amplify their business, trying to do this, it feels like we're being pulled in all of these directions. I know you've got your software company. You're an author, a speaker, a coach, building a business, a mother. Balancing all of this stuff is a lot like how people feel when they're getting started online. How do you manage all of this? With all of these things, having a software company, being a coach, building a business, was that the plan when you got started or was that just something that you fell into as it went?

Kim Ades:
Well plans are interesting things, right? Was it an intellectually crafted plan? Was it in my business outline? The answer is no. On that front, yes. I fell into it, but I would say that it is a divinely created plan, one that is uniquely suited to my strengths and who I am. You asked a question and the question was, how do you balance all of this? I have to say the balance question happens to me all the time. Clients ask it, podcasters ask it, the balance question. Here's my answer to the balance question: when you go to a park ... You know, you take your kids, you go to a park and there's a seesaw. One kid gets on the one side, the other kid gets on the other side. What happens when the seesaw is perfectly in balance?

Lance Tamashiro:
It's right in the middle and nobody has any fun.

Kim Ades:
That's right. Nothing happens, right? Nothing happens. There's no movement. There's no action. There's no thrill. There's no ride. There's no experience. It's perfectly balanced and it's very temporary, we could say. Right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah.

Kim Ades:
For me, going for balance is the wrong goal. That's the wrong goal. That's not what we're really after. What we're really after is enjoying the highs and the lows. It's going for the ride. It's experiencing the passion and the excitement of wherever you are. For me, do I have balance in my life? I have to say probably not. That's not necessarily what I'm seeking for myself. What I do is I seriously focus on where I am when I'm there. Right now, there's ... Nothing else exists except you and me.

Lance Tamashiro:
This is a super interesting point though, because I love this. You said it this way. You said, "You have to experience the highs and the lows."

Kim Ades:
That's right.

Lance Tamashiro:
You probably see this with so many of the clients that you work with, people that you watch building a business, people that are trying to accomplish any goal, and it's this. We all see this all the time. People get really excited about their business or what they're going to do or whatever that goal is, and then it doesn't work out the way that they've planned. Either it motivates them to move forward or they throw their hands up and they say, "This doesn't work. I'm not cut out for this. I'm going to give up on my dream," or whatever it is. How do you help clients manage the lows? Even how to manage the highs, because I think that both are equally important, as far as expectations and management of those. These two things can both get us in a real sense of trouble. I think that's why you probably get asked about balance so often, because it almost feels like the safe place to be, although you're right, there is no movement happening if you're there.

Kim Ades:
Well it's a great question. I'll tell you, I just got off a coaching call a few minutes ago with someone who is actually rather successful but experienced what she would call a significant failure about seven years ago in her business career. Like a really big, for her, a big low. Seven years later, she's still carrying it with her in her current experience. That experience has caused her to be a little more careful, a little more trepidation, taking fewer risks, really preventing her from building her current business to the size that she would have always dreamed for it to be. What I do with my clients is I examine those past events and say, "What is the meaning that you've extracted from those past events? What's the story you tell about those past events?"

You had a poor experience. How does it reflect upon you? That question is super important, because the meaning we attribute to our past experiences will determine what happens in the future. Very often, we invent or we ascribe meaning that is completely fictitious and usually puts ourselves ... Paints us in a bad light and causes us to feel a sense of debilitation and paralysis. The truth of the matter is we've invented it. One of the inventions we've made is if we've failed in the past, there's a high likelihood we'll fail in the future. That's not true. That's an invention.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love the way that you put this. It's the experience was the experience, and we tell these stories about it. For me personally, not just in business but in anything that I'm trying to accomplish, that's the value that I really see in a coach, a third party observer, somebody to bounce stuff off of. Because if I get left by myself with my own thoughts and what I do, it's weird how ... I don't know if it's our society or the way that I was brought up or the way that we're all brought up. I tell bad stories about my failures and I tell bad stories about my successes. If something successful happens, "Oh, I was in the right place at the right time," or, "It wasn't the hard work that I put into it. It wasn't all of these." Sometimes there was some ounce of luck, but I put myself in that position.

I tend to tell negative stories as a default, both to positive things and negative things that have happened to me. The value for me of having a coach is that I can bounce that out there and say, "This is how I'm thinking about this." A lot of times, having somebody else go, "You're being ridiculous about this. Here's how it's going to help you. Here's the positive we can extract from it," helps me overcome, and more importantly, move forward in a positive light, how you're talking about with your clients.

Kim Ades:
Well then what you're really eluding to is this, and this is what I talk about all day and all night, is it's your thinking that will determine what you will achieve fundamentally. Very often, our needs are [inaudible 00:07:21] when we want to achieve something is, "Let's create a plan. Let's create an action plan. Let's start doing things." Right? "Let's get into a state where our actions ..." We've all heard of the concept of take massive action, right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes.

Kim Ades:
You can't get anything done until you do. You can't accomplish anything until you take action. My advice is before you start taking massive action, identify the thoughts that are going to get in your way of succeeding with your action.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah.

Kim Ades:
Clean those up. Then start to take action, because now your action will be much more lined up with your goals and nothing will get in your way. If you think to yourself, "Man, I failed in the past. I don't know if I can do it. I don't think I'm equipped. Yeah, fine. I've had some successes, but they were all due to luck." All that conversation actually serves to slow you down more than any other factor. That conversation needs to get addressed and cleaned up and [inaudible 00:08:21] right away.

Lance Tamashiro:
It's so funny, because ... I don't know if it's always been this way, but it seems like in my lifetime and especially with business or whether it's golf or whatever it is that I'm trying to learn, we live in this society where information is packaged to us in systems. Right? They say, "If you want to learn how to build a business, follow these step-by-steps." Then you'll get to the business part. For me personally what happens is I follow those steps, that recipe, and something goes wrong along the way or the outcome doesn't happen exactly the way that I envisioned in my head. The first thing I think is, "It doesn't work." Then I think, "Well, there's an art and a science, right? I learned the science. That's the system. Now I've got to apply this. Why didn't this work for me? Is it my mindset? Is it something I did different? Is it because I'm in a different niche? How can I tweak this?"

I see so many people that get stuck on they're following something, step by step. Usually building a business. Something goes wrong and they think, "This doesn't work," or, "This doesn't work for me." How do you deal with clients that are in that state of mind, where, "I did it. It doesn't work." Or, "Try AdWords." "I did AdWords. I tried paid traffic. It doesn't work. I tried selling my thing here. It doesn't work." How do you get them over that, to realize that maybe it's not necessarily the system, but how they're approaching it or thinking about it?

Kim Ades:
Let me tell you a story and then I'll come back to your question, okay? The other day ... I live in Toronto, and in Toronto, we have this massive subway system. My 16-year-old daughter was getting together with friends. She went downtown. We have these board game cafes. She went into this board game café and she had to be home at a certain hour. She headed back to the subway and the door she went in was locked. She couldn't get into the subway. All of a sudden, she panicked a little bit, but she ended up calling home and speaking to my husband. She said, "I'm lost. I can't find the entrance to the subway. Can you help me?" The first question that he asked is, "Where are you now? What do you see around you? What direction are you pointed in? What do you see across the street? Where are you now?"

Because if all of a sudden, he just said, "Here are the instructions. Take three steps forward, two steps to the right. Hang a left over there." Who knows where she would have ended up?

Lance Tamashiro:
Right.

Kim Ades:
The first and most important question is, where are you now? What do you see around you? His job was to orient her to have her pointing in the right direction. This is the biggest problem that I see over and over again when people try to implement systems. "Here's the formula for maps of online success," is that people don't understand where they're pointed to begin with. They start to follow the steps, but fundamentally, they're headed in the wrong direction. My job is to say, "Hold on a minute. Stop taking all this crazy action, this chaotic dizziness. Let's slow down for a minute and let's see where you're pointed. Let's make sure you're pointed in the right direction." What the means is in coaching language, "Let's clean up the thoughts that are causing problems for you, that are causing a slowdown, that are getting in the way. Let's have you pointed in the right direction. Once you're pointed in the right direction, all the actions that you need to take A, will happen naturally, B, will yield positive results."

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean I almost get this ... As you're talking about this, I get this visualization almost of a slingshot, you know? You're pointed in the wrong direction. Your trajectory is wrong. I love how you say your job as a coach is to get you pointed in the right direction and then let you run with all of that action, because you're going to get where you want to go.

Kim Ades:
Exactly. Meanwhile, what we see is all these people are running around in circles in a frenzy, going, "Why am I not getting to where I want to go?"

Lance Tamashiro:
Because I think we've all felt that way, right? I just know I've got to do something to succeed, so I'll just do whatever next thing shows up in my inbox.

Kim Ades:
That's right. I cannot over emphasize this concept that action follows thought. First we think, then we act. When our actions don't yield the right results, then what we need to do is say, "Okay, how is my thinking creating these outcomes?" What people tend to do is start taking different actions. You've heard the expression, "If you always did what you always do, what you always did, you'll get what you've always got." You've heard that one before. It's flawed. The flaw is this, that if we replace the concept of action with thought ... If we say it like this, "If you always think what you always thought, you'll always get what you always got." Our job is to start to ask ourselves one vital question. It's, "How am I thinking about this that is causing for me a slowdown?"

Lance Tamashiro:
I love this.

Kim Ades:
Right?

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah.

Kim Ades:
Now if we think about ... Here's another great example. When we look at a dog and we want the dog to wag its tail, we don't grab the tail and shake. Right? That's not what we do. Except that's what a lot of people do when they want to achieve their goals.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yeah, I agree.

Kim Ades:
Right? They're attacking it from the wrong end of the spectrum.

Lance Tamashiro:
It makes perfect sense when you don't know what you don't know.

Kim Ades:
Correct.

Lance Tamashiro:
Like trying to get the tail to wag. I'm going to wag the tail.

Kim Ades:
That's right.

Lance Tamashiro:
Man, I think that if people think about this and look at these things, it totally does help. Now the million dollar question, right? Maybe this is not something we can answer right now, but hopefully there's something that we can get people pointed in the right direction, is at the end of all of this, the real answer is you've got to be honest enough with yourself to answer the question, right? To answer it honestly. How am I thinking about this that is either serving me or not serving me? How can somebody know that they're being honest with themselves enough or come up with a real honest answer to this question?

Kim Ades:
Well, look. I'm going to give you three things that I've seen for entrepreneurs who are super successful. It's three thinking strategies. For whoever is listening, you might want to write this down. These thinking strategies are what top entrepreneurs use over and over again. It's their go to. It's their knee jerk place. Thing number one is when they're experiencing a challenge, for example, they ask themselves the first question, which is, "What belief do I have? What do I believe to be true about this particular situation that is causing me to experience these outcomes? How can I start to challenge those beliefs in order to get other outcomes?" What it boils down to is, "How am I thinking about this that is causing me a slowdown? What belief do I have?" The word 'belief' is important.

For example, a lot of entrepreneurs believe that they don't have enough money, right? They don't have enough money and they can't start their business. That's where they get stuck. The belief is there's a limited amount of money and they can't go elsewhere to start or that they need a certain amount of money before they can get started. All those things are things we invent. We make them up.

Lance Tamashiro:
Right.

Kim Ades:
We create limitations for ourselves. How am I thinking about this in a limited fashion that's getting in my way? That's question number one. What do I believe to be true, that I can challenge? Question number two is, what resources are available to me that I haven't considered? We have resources that we don't think are available to us. I'll give you an example. I coached a rabbi in the city, quite a formidable rabbi. He was brought in because he wanted to bring in more young families into the congregation. At the time, when I started coaching him, the congregation was struggling financially. He said, "You know, I just can't do it all by myself." I said, "Well what about finding some help?" He said, "We can't afford it. I can't go spend money now, when we're in financial difficulty." I said, "Who said you have to spend money to hire help? Maybe there's some volunteers available. Maybe there are some people in the community who would be more than willing to help. Maybe there are some resources, some experts, some talent that you're not tapping into."

The moment he started thinking along those lines, the moment he was able to access volunteers who were more than willing to help. What resources are available to me that I never thought of? The third thing is, what do I want? What these entrepreneurs do is they focus on what they want without getting distracted. I have to say people ... As human beings, we get distracted really, really easily. What these entrepreneurs do is they build the muscle of constantly pivoting back to what it is that they want. It's not that they never get distracted. They get distracted, but they come back fast. "What do I want? Oh yeah. That's where I'm going. Oh yeah." They keep turning themselves towards what it is they want.

Lance Tamashiro:
I love all of this stuff, especially the first one, because I think the limiting beliefs is where people that I watch struggling never can even get themselves in a position to worry about number two or number three. Right?

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
If you stop with, "I don't have the money," then who cares about the other stuff? You're done. Go do something else if that's honestly what you believe. It's like they must know that it's not true or they wouldn't continue beating their head against the wall about wanting to be an entrepreneur, right?

Kim Ades:
Right.

Lance Tamashiro:
Somewhere, they know that it's not true. I think that what I like about the limiting beliefs is almost everyone that you see people talk about ... The big ones that come to mind for me are money, skill and knowledge, or time. Right? I mean money, you went through everything with that. Time, we all have the same amount of time. You've got five kids. I know how it is just for two kids and having a wife that handles the majority of it, but all of us don't have time. The question is how to become more efficient and find the time, and then also finding the skill sets. That's all learned. We all start in the same places. I think that that's such a big one. Even just acknowledging that we have these limiting beliefs, whatever they may be, that are stopping us.

It puts us in a position to make a decision. Is this a belief I'm going to work through or is this true for me? If it is, you're probably not going to get to the goal that you want to get to, or you need a good coach to get you through that mental block that you've got, if it's something you truly want to do.

Kim Ades:
Well let's look at the one where you talked about time, right? It's not only becoming more efficient with time. It's really addressing the thinking that says, "Here are all of the things that I have to do." I have to tell you, most entrepreneurs don't have to actually do most of what they take on.

Lance Tamashiro:
Yes.

Kim Ades:
It's really about looking at someone's thinking. The other thing is the concept of outsourcing, the concept of delegation, the concept of really focusing on those two or three core actions that will lead to the outcomes they're looking for, rather than getting involved and engaged with a million things they think they should do. Even the question of timing isn't just about managing the moving parts. It's all about thinking. All of it.

Lance Tamashiro:
How would somebody ... Because a lot of this ... I get overwhelmed when I think about big goals. When I started my business at zero, my first goal was $3,000, then it was like $10,000, all of these goals. I couldn't stop thinking about, "I want to make $100,000 a year." Or, "I want to make $200,000 a year." What happens in my head is I get overwhelmed with the bigger goal. Does that make sense?

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
All I can focus on is, "I want to make a quarter of a million dollars," or whatever that number is. $10,000 a month, whatever it is that I put in my head. What I've found when I was getting started was that that big goal overwhelmed me almost to the point that I couldn't move. Why would I do something that makes me $5 when my goal is $10,000 a month? Logically, I know that if I make $5 X amount of times, I'll get there, but I don't know if it's my ego or my brain or my overwhelm. I'm always looking for what I don't have rather than what I do have, that can get me there.

Kim Ades:
Well that's an interesting thing. That's what we do. It's not just you. A lot of people do. They focus on what's missing rather than what they have, right? That's not an uncommon tendency, but the issue is this, is that why do big goals overwhelm us? Because they seem so far away. They seem so difficult for us to achieve. They seem so just such a stretch. It's really at the end of the day, a belief. Do I believe it's possible to reach this goal? If at the end of the day, it's just too far away, then what we want to do for people is say, "Okay, you know what? That's great. We're glad that you have that goal, but if you fundamentally believe that you can't achieve this goal, let's move the target." Targets are movable at all times, right? We want people to take manageable bites in their thinking. Not in their actions. In their thinking.

Lance Tamashiro:
Nice. Yeah. What I like about this ... I think you put it the best way, is these targets are movable.

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
I think that there's so many times that people go, "Well, I told so and so I was going to make a $10,000 a month business, so that's it." It's like, "Well, how about must make a $3,000 a month business?" That's something you can reach. I know for me, through my journey in building stuff, having a coach, having a mastermind group, having other people to look at me and say, "You're thinking like ..." I can't always see it myself. I love that there's these questions and I hope everybody wrote these things down. "What do I believe to be true that I can challenge? What resources do I have available? What do I really want, so that I can stop getting distracted?"

Write those things down and stick them on a sticky pad. Because really, if you can ... Whenever you're feeling demotivated, whenever you feel you're off track, if you can answer those three questions and your answers stay the same ... Not for what's limiting you. That should go away, but what you want and where you're distracted, that's what's going to push you through that and keep you on track for when you feel overwhelmed. Right?

Kim Ades:
Well that's exactly it. Honestly, one of the things that we do when we coach people is we ask them to journal in an online journal every single day. They share their journal with their coach. Again, for whoever is listening, pick up a journal or find an online journal and come. We can introduce you to ours. Journaling is a huge, huge powerful tool that will help in the process of self-reflection and just starting to become aware of how your thinking operates and starting to understand how your thinking sometimes propels you forward, but very often just gets in your way. Getting ahold of that is the single most effective method of reaching your goals.

Lance Tamashiro:
Can you talk about this a little bit? Just when you say to go ahead and journal, what should people be writing down? What should people be tracking? I agree with you. I think if you could have ... I wish I had everything that I had ever thought or did or wrote down over the last 10 years to look at and go, "Oh, you think like ..." You can start to see these patterns, but what are people supposed to be keeping track of? How long should this take them every day?

Kim Ades:
Well it could take anywhere from five to ten minutes to a half an hour. It doesn't really matter. Every day is going to be different, depending on what's going on and how you're feeling about what's going on. I have a very, very simple and basic formula for people who want to journal. The formula is this. Use your journal to unload. I use a funny way of putting it, but it's dump, dump and then dump the dump. What does that mean? It means unload. Put it down. Write it down. Whatever is frustrating you, worrying you, causing you confusion, whatever it is, write it down. When you think you're done, keep going so it's completely on paper or online or whatever. Just get rid of it. Then at the end of your journal, what you want to say is, "Okay." You want to write the words down, "Okay, it's time to turn myself around."

At the end of your journal, remind yourself what it is that you really want. Write it again. "Here's where I'm headed. Here's where I'm going. Here's what I want. Here's what I look forward to. Here are some of the things I'm going to do and think about in order to get there." Always end your journal reminding yourself where you're going. Again, that's the idea about building that internal muscle, the pivoting muscle that helps you go to where you want to go instead of going where the ocean floats you. Right? It's really an important concept right there.

Now one of the things we do is we have a course that we offer called FOM, Frame of Mind Essentials. Really it's a self-guided journaling program. It's fairly affordable, but you get a journaling prompt every three days. The prompts help you think about things that you haven't thought of before. You get to submit your journals to a coach for review and you get some coaching along the way, too. It's a really great, easy, affordable method to get coached, where you're guiding the process yourself.

Lance Tamashiro:
Right. What I love about that with the prompts and basically ... What I'm getting from how you described this is every three days, they get a prompt like ... I'm just going to make this up, like, "Where did you struggle today? What did you do well? What's holding you back? What do you believe about ..." They fill that in.

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
That then goes to a coach, and then the coach gives them some feedback to help them out. They get the benefit of the journaling, the dump, dump and then dump some more unloading, but also some third party outside coaching and looking all built into one. When you say that they dictate how the coaching happens, it's because it starts with the journaling and where they're at at all times.

Kim Ades:
That's right. They get to choose a journal or two every month that they can submit to a coach. On top of that, they get a podcast. I'm the one who does the podcast, where I use cases and I provide some coaching for those cases. Those cases are very universal. It could be somebody who just got into a major fight with their spouse. Show me one person who never had a fight with their spouse.

Lance Tamashiro:
Not me. Definitely.

Kim Ades:
Right. What do you do in that case? It's very universal. They listen to the podcast and they say, "Man, I could use that advice. I know exactly what to do with that. I know a person." It's just very, very applicable. You're getting all kinds of levels here. In addition, you're coaching in a community where you might read and respond to one another's journals. That's very helpful, too. You're getting a lot of input. You're getting a lot of people who are looking at your thinking and providing you with feedback.

Lance Tamashiro:
You know, Kim, one of the things that I love about your message, the way that you do this ... I've interviewed a lot of coaches, business people and stuff, is that you are one of the most clear people in your system. I love how much you stress that it starts at your beliefs and getting pointed in the right direction, because I agree with this completely. I watch people that struggle. I'm in a great place to watch people struggle. This is sad to say. It's not that I like to watch, but I like to see what holds people back. On Facebook, all of the time, where something goes wrong and they almost do your dump, dump and dump some more on Facebook. What I see happening is that everybody piles on with them, right? They go, "Oh yeah." A whole bunch of people start wallowing in their misery.

Kim Ades:
Yeah.

Lance Tamashiro:
What I like about what you do with the Frame of Mind Essentials is that they still get to do the dump, dump and dump some more, but then it gets turned into a positive. Then it's done, right? "Okay, I've got this out of here. Now it's time for me to decide what I really want and how to overcome this." I see so many people getting stuck on social media with the negative attitudes and everybody cosigning on their misery whereas what you've got is basically that same kind of system, except that once it's out there, your negativity is done. It's now, "How do we solve this problem?"

Kim Ades:
Right. This is our very lightest version of coaching. Of course there are other types of coaching that we do where it becomes more intimate, more intense, where you're hiring a coach to work with you one on one. We're really, really working with you every single day and reading your journals and digging into your thinking and helping you clear out the kind of thinking that's really, really preventing you from moving forward and reaching your goals. It's almost like magic. The distance that clients travel in a relatively short period of time is astonishing, absolutely astonishing.

Lance Tamashiro:
I mean I know that in my own journey, once I figured out that it wasn't completely about systems, that it wasn't completely about anybody can build a business, even though everybody can, that it was more about the way that I was approaching things, more the way that I looked at things and the things that I believed. I know for myself personally, I made huge leaps. Those are the times when I make the biggest leaps and bounds. When I do what you said is number one. When I challenge what I believe to be true and then get rid of that. It's crazy how if you don't do this exercise, in 60 days, how these beliefs just build back up in your head and they hold you back.

Kim Ades:
That's right.

Lance Tamashiro:
I know that what you're talking about absolutely works. If somebody is listening to this and they want to find out about this Frame of Mind Essentials, they want to find out about what you do, the things that you talk about and maybe even are interested in coaching, how can somebody find out about these things?

Kim Ades:
The absolute best thing to do, and it's the best thing to do because it is risk-free, cost-free, and it delivers value without any strings attached, is to go to Frame of Mind Coaching. Right there on the front page is the opportunity fill out an assessment. It's not the kind of assessment that spits out a report like you would find on Facebook, but it's a series of questions. There are two types of questions. One type just gives us a snapshot of where you are right now on a variety of areas in your life. The second kind of questions are journaling questions. What you do is you fill that out.

This is your opportunity to say, "Here's where I am right now." The same as I described with my daughter, right? "Here's where I am right now. Here is where I'm pointing." That assessment goes to a coach who reads and sets up an appointment with you to review your assessment. Those calls, [inaudible 00:32:44] by themselves will create traction for you, will help you move forward. Of course we want to invite you into coaching, but it's not mandatory. You don't have to do it. Those calls alone will create forward movement, will make a difference for you all by themselves. That's the first and most important thing that I would encourage anybody to do, is go to Frame of Mind Coaching and take that assessment.

Lance Tamashiro:
Awesome. I agree. I think that everybody should go check out this frameofmindcoaching.com. Fill it out and get the assessment. I think that the value in just figuring out where you're at, the value in having somebody look at this ... If you've never done this kind of thing and you've never had coaching or you haven't had coaching that is so targeted on these beliefs and moving you forward, this is something that everybody and everybody listening needs and should take advantage of. You can check that out again at frameofmindcoaching.com.

Kim, I super appreciate you taking the time to be here today. Like I said, I love your message. I love the way that you do this coaching. Maybe we can have you back again, but it's been great having you on here. Hope you have ag reat day.

Kim Ades:
Well, it's an absolute pleasure. Thank you so much for the opportunity.

Lance Tamashiro:
All right. Thank you, everybody. As always, thank you for listening to the Lance Tamashiro Show. We look forward to talking to you on the next episode. Have a great day. Bye now.

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